May 16 2011Congratulations to the April 10th 201

first_imgMay 16, 2011Congratulations to the April 10th, 2011 workshop graduates:back from left: Charles Griffin, Riccardo Milletari [Italy, planning internship], Elliot Wells [scholarship]front from left: Elfriede Jeller [Canada], Saki Oba [Japan], Cristina Freni [Italy, planning internship], Logan Bier [scholarship]last_img

December 13 2013The annual Arcosanti Christmas pa

first_imgDecember 13, 2013The annual Arcosanti Christmas party took place on Wednesday evening, December 10. 2014.Staff, volunteers, workshop participants and friends and family got together for a pot-luck dinner in the Arcosanti cafe.[photos by Colleen Connery, text by Sue Kirsch]The Christmas tree is filled with good wishes for everyone.1978 Alumna Ann Whitehill visited during the Christmas celebration and is getting a hug from Jeff Stein.last_img

Rep Vaupel plan creates higher standards for Michigan pet stores

first_img State Rep. Hank Vaupel, a veterinarian of more than 40 years, today said his plan to strengthen standards for Michigan pet stores will protect animals and the families who adopt them.Vaupel’s legislation, approved today by the House Agriculture Committee, prevents Michigan pet stores from acquiring dogs from unregulated breeders, sometimes known as “puppy mills.” It also establishes a minimum age at which puppies can be placed up for adoption, ensures all dogs to have a certified health certificate from a licensed veterinarian, and requires dogs to be vaccinated and micro-chipped.“As a veterinarian, I’m dedicated to looking out for the health and welfare of all animals,” said Vaupel, of Fowlerville. “This plan will help ensure only reputable pet stores and breeders will be allowed to operate in Michigan. Unscrupulous breeders and stores that don’t look out for the safety of their pets have no business in our communities, and this legislation makes that clear.”Under the plan laid out in House Bills 5916-17, breeders would be required to supply their U.S. Department of Agriculture inspection reports to pet stores, in their entirety.“Any major violations within the past two years would make it impossible for a breeder to engage in sales to a pet store in Michigan,” Vaupel said.While implementing these safeguards, the legislation also provide necessary protections for responsible local breeders and pet stores that are committed to pet safety.With demand in American households for pets growing every year, more and more consumers turn online or unwittingly to sources like flea markets or unregulated breeders. In a recent study by the Better Business Bureau, experts believe up to 80 percent of online advertisements for pets may be fraudulent. In addition, when forced to online retailers, consumers often have no recourse if the puppy is unhealthy or not as advertised.“We must recognize the responsible breeders and local store owners who pour their hearts and souls into building safe and humane facilities, employ dozens of people and are ingrained in the fabric of local communities across our state,” Vaupel said. “Governmental entities should not be allowed to enact overbearing regulations for the sole purpose of putting reputable pet shops out of business.”The legislation now moves to the full House for consideration.### 16May Rep. Vaupel plan creates higher standards for Michigan pet stores Categories: Vaupel Newslast_img read more