Physicians falter on test of bioterrorism awareness

first_img The authors say their findings suggest that the government should include physician education among its bioterrrorism preparedness priorities. On the diagnosis questions, the average pretraining score was 46.8%. The participants scored 70.5% on anthrax-related questions, 50.7% for smallpox, 49.6% for botulism, and 16.3% for pneumonic plague. After the training, the average diagnostic score improved to 79.0%. The 631 physicians were among 2,407 physicians in 30 internal medicine residency programs in 16 states and Washington, DC, who were invited to participate in the study. Thirty participants (4.8%) were attending physicians, and nearly all the rest were residents. In one common diagnostic error, after reading a description of a rash that was consistent with varicella, 42.6% of participants concluded it was smallpox. On the management side, more than 90% of participants knew the importance of quickly giving botulinum antitoxin for botulism, but 31.4% wrongly opted for giving antibiotics too. The level of training didn’t seem to affect the residents’ scores, as first-, second-, and third-year residents all averaged about the same on the pretraining test, the report says. However, the attending physicians scored significantly higher than the residents, with an average score of 50.0% versus 36.9%. Geographic region had no apparent effect on the scores. “The ability of physicians to distinguish smallpox, anthrax, botulism, and plague from other, more common disorders was poor, as was their ability to manage illness due to bioterrorism agents once a diagnosis had been made,” the report states. One bright spot, however, was that most physicians could distinguish inhalational anthrax from other community-acquired pneumonias, probably because of publicity generated by the anthrax attacks of 2001. Sep 28, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Hospital residents did poorly on a test of their ability to recognize and manage diseases potentially related to bioterrorism, but they fared much better after taking an online training program, according to a report in Archives of Internal Medicine. But the average scores on both tests rose to 79% after the residents completed the Web-based training program. One limitation of the study was that participants knew they were completing a training module on bioterrorism, which could have affected their diagnostic judgments, the report says. However, they were told that illnesses described might or might not be due to bioterrorism agents. The 631 physicians who participated in the study correctly diagnosed anthrax, smallpox, pneumonic plague, and botulism less than half the time, and they made correct management decisions only a quarter of the time, according to the report by Sara E. Cosgrove and colleagues from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. On the management test, physicians scored an average of only 25.4% before training. They were right 60.2% of the time on botulism questions, but they scored only 14.6% on smallpox, 17.0% on anthrax, and 9.7% on plague. After taking the training, the overall average score soared to 79.1%. The physicians took a multiple-choice test on diagnosis and management of the four diseases before going through the training module. Afterward they took another test, with different questions. Anthrax, smallpox, botulism, and pneumonic plague are four of the six diseases or disease classes that terrorists are considered most likely to try to use. Cosgrove SE, Perl TM, Xiaoyan S, et al. Ability of physicians to diagnose and manage illness due to category A bioterrorism agents. Arch Int Med 2005;165(17):2002-6 [Full text]last_img read more

The Latest: Nebraska athletics announces furloughs, pay cuts

first_imgThe Latest: Nebraska athletics announces furloughs, pay cuts Associated Press ___There will be no fans for the Denver Broncos’ season opener against the Tennessee Titans on Monday night Sept. 14 because of the COVID-19 crisis.The Broncos said Friday they hope to have fans at subsequent games. The team has sold out every home game since the 1960s.The Broncos have been working with the Colorado governor’s office, using computer-generated plans that include up to 20,000 fans at Empower Field at Mile High.But the team said having an empty stadium for the opener was the “responsible thing to do right now for our community.” Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditThe Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:___Nebraska is putting 51 athletic department employees on furlough and all others will take a 10% pay cut in response to the budget crisis caused by the coronavirus pandemic. In a statement, athletics director Doug Gillin said the team will return to work in small groups or “pods.” The program is also implementing “more stringent capacity limits” on shared facilities such as the locker room or weight room.The school said Tuesday night there have been active cases for seven students and four staffers associated with the team. Gillin’s statement Friday said the team went through scheduled testing on Wednesday before the school cleared the way for a return to workouts.___Iowa will drop four sports programs at the end of the 2020-21 academic year in response to the financial hardships caused by the coronavirus pandemic.School President Bruce Harreld and athletic director Gary Barta said in a joint statement that a projected revenue loss of $100 million forced the university to discontinue men’s gymnastics, men’s tennis and men’s and women’s swimming and diving. ___French league clubs Monaco and Lens both say one of their players has tested positive for the coronavirus.Monaco did not name the player but says he is recovering and that the club has informed league officials.Monaco is scheduled to play at home against Reims on Sunday in the opening weekend of the season.Lens defender Jonathan Clauss has also tested positive for the virus. Lens coach Franck Haise says Clauss is showing no symptoms and is in isolation from the rest of the squad. The furloughs and pay cuts will be in effect from Sept. 1 through Dec. 31.“The postponement of the fall sports season, and specifically the football season, has put us in the position of making some very difficult decisions that impact every member of our staff,” athletic director Bill Moos said. “In my three decades as an athletic director, I have always said that people are our most valuable resource and there is no question that is true here at Nebraska. These are outstanding staff members and great people, and that is what makes this a particularly tough day.”The measures are in addition to department cuts announced in June that included a 10% reduction in overall expenses for the 2021 fiscal year, no merit raises and the elimination of 17 jobs. In total, staffing decisions are expected to result in a savings of about $3 million.___Appalachian State’s football team is returning to practice Friday after pausing workouts because of a coronavirus cluster. August 21, 2020 The University of Louisiana-Monroe has paused football practices because of nine new positive COVID-19 tests earlier this week, athletic director Scott McDonald said Friday.McDonald says ULM hopes to resume practice by early next week as soon as ongoing testing indicates it is safe to do so.“We fully anticipated an increased exposure to COVID-19 with the reopening of campus, the beginning of the fall semester as well as uptick in related off-campus activities,” McDonald said. “We also knew that we would have to work to create a modified student-athlete bubble once classes and on-campus activities resumed this month. “We’ll await the latest round of test results while continuing to monitor our quarantined and isolated student-athletes.” ULM officials say the school has administered 1,404 virus and antibody tests combined to athletes and staff across all sports since mid-June. So far, 34 total tests have been positive. The Warhawks football team is slated to open its season Sept. 5 at Troy. ___The Southeastern Conference has modified its previously announced requirements for COVID-19 testing.The league has outlined specific cardiac evaluation requirements from its initial report and will have a third, rapid test close to competition for sports with a high risk of close contact.The SEC’s Return to Activity and Medical Guidance Task Force has now specified the cardiac evaluation would mandate a troponin level, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and a medical evaluation by a physician.___ ___Vanderbilt has canceled Friday’s practice after some positive COVID-19 test results.The private Southeastern Conference university is not sharing the number of positive results. But Vanderbilt issued a statement noting the university’s ongoing testing procedures has “positive COVID-19 test results.”Vanderbilt says it is working closely with its Public Health Command Center and other health officials assessing potential close contacts and advising on additional steps. But Vanderbilt cites federal student privacy law in not disclosing information that could identify any student who has tested positive.SEC schools started practice Monday with the league set to start a 10-game, league-only season Sept. 26. The athletic department deficit is projected at $60 million to $75 million this year.The four sports programs will compete in 2020-21 if circumstances surrounding COVID-19 permit. Existing scholarships will be honored through graduation for athletes who remain at Iowa. The contracts of affected coaches will be honored.Among factors considered for which sports to cut were number of schools sponsoring teams at the Division I level; impact on gender equity and Title IX compliance; expense savings; history of the sport at Iowa; and engagement level.Iowa is the second school from a Power Five conference to drop sports programs. Stanford announced last month it would cut 11 sports.Nearly 200 sports programs across three NCAA divisions and the NAIA have been eliminated since the coronavirus pandemic began in the United States in March. Newly-promoted Lens is also in action on Sunday. The club will travel south to play Nice.___The World of Outlaws is “ramping up” its COVID-19 protocols following an outbreak after last weekend’s event at Knoxville, Iowa.The sprint car series confirmed “several drivers and crew members have tested positive for COVID-19” following the Saturday night main event won by suspended NASCAR driver Kyle Larson.Daryn Pittman, Tori Knutson and Paul McMahan all confirmed they had tested positive for the coronavirus. Kraig Kinser Racing and Roth Motorsports said team members had tested positive and Knoxville Raceway said one of its employees had tested positive. “We’re fully aware that we’re managing a fluid situation,” ULM coach Matt Viator said. “While disappointed, we realized that the suspension of practice was a real possibility sometime this preseason. … Our team remains optimistic that we’ll be able to safely compete this fall.”___The Detroit Lions say they will not have fans at their first two home because of the COVID-19 pandemic.The team also announced Friday that parking lots near the stadium and businesses within the indoor facility will be closed when Detroit hosts the Chicago Bears on Sept. 13 and the New Orleans Saints on Oct. 4.The Lions may allow spectators to watch their game at Ford Field on Nov. 1 against the Indianapolis Colts. Series officials urged anyone at the track who had come into contact with those infected to get tested. Several other participants and family members tested positive following that notification.Fans were allowed at the races last weekend and also took part in autograph sessions. WoO says it will be reverting to the initial protocols in place when the series resumed racing earlier in the pandemic. Among the tightened restrictions will be closing the pit area to fans until further notice.The World of Outlaws says all affected parties must quarantine until medically cleared to return to the track. Drivers racing for season-long points now unable to race because of the positive test will receive points based on their average finish for the season until they are able to return.___More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sportslast_img read more

B&H Athletes at the Balkan Indoor Championships in Istanbul

first_imgB&H athletic representation will participate today at the Balkan Indoor Championships in Istanbul.7 athletes will represent B&H at the first official international competition of this season: Sait Huseinbašić (60 m), Boris Dragojlović (400 m) and Mesud Pezer (ball and disck), Gorana Cvijetić (60 m hurdles), Svjetlana Graorac (60 m), Mladena Petrušić (vis) and Tanja Marković (long jump).In the delegation of B&H Athletic Association in Turkey will participate President Neđo Đurović, the coach of B&H men’s representation Nebojša Matijević and the trainer Mehmed Skender.(Source: Fena)last_img