Dr Brent Crandal joined us instudio to discuss suicide prevention

first_img Updated: 10:43 PM September 10, 2018 Categories: Health, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom center_img Dr. Brent Crandal joined us in-studio to discuss suicide prevention 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The purpose is to raise awareness that suicide can be prevented.The day was organized by the International Association for Suicide Prevention and co-sponsored by the World Health Organization.According to the WHO’s first global report on suicide prevention, more than 800-thousand people die by suicide every year.In the United States, suicide rates have gone up 25-percent in the last 20 years.The phone number for the National Suicide Prevention lifeline is… 1-800-273-TALK (8255).Here in San Diego Rady Children’s Hospital has launched a program to screen children who may potentially be suicidal.Dr. Brent Crandal, child and family psychologist at Rady’s Children’s Hospital, joined us in-studio Monday for more. Posted: September 10, 2018last_img read more

Wilmington Rotary Club Auctioning Off Pair Of Red Sox Tickets wGift Cards

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Wilmington Rotary Club’s 4th Community Ice Bucket Challenge to benefit ALS research will be held on Saturday, August 18th from 10am to 1pm at Rotary Park.This year, the Rotary Club is pleased to “leadoff” theirefforts with an exciting offer — An  Evening at Fenway Park.The prize package includes:Two third-base grandstand tickets (Section 24, Row 9, Seats 9-10) for the Monday, August 20, 7:10pm game vs. Cleveland Indians$50 Gift Card to the Red Sox Souvenir Shop$50 Gift Card to Eastern Standard, a restaurant less than a 5-minute walk from FenwayYou can bid for this terrific package via the Rotary Club’s Facebook page HERE or by calling “Scooter” Cunningham at 978-944-0155.(NOTE: The above information is from the Wilmington Rotary Club.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedREMINDER: Wilmington Rotary Club’s 5th Annual Community Ice Bucket Challenge Set For This Saturday, August 17In “Community”Wilmington Rotary Club’s 5th Annual Community Ice Bucket Challenge Set For August 17In “Community”Wilmington’s Ice Bucket Challenge Raises $5K For ALS Research, 100+ WHS Students ParticipateIn “Community”last_img read more

3 Juba League men shot in city

first_imgThree local unit leaders and activists of Juba League, youth wing of ruling Bangladesh Awami League (AL), received bullet injuries after miscreants opened fire on them in Wari area of the capital on Saturday.The injured are—Jewel, 32, general secretary of ward no 41, Robin, 30, president of unit 3 of ward 41, and Kajol, 37, a local Juba League activist, reports UNB.One of the injured, Robin, claimed a group of five people wearing masks opened fire at them around 8:45pm while they were gossiping at a butcher’s shop in Dakkhin Musanadi area, and fled the scene immediately.Local people took the injured to Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH).Confirming the incident, sub-inspector of DMCH police outpost Md Bacchu Mia said the three are undergoing treatment at the hospital.last_img

West accuses Russia of global hacking conspiracy

first_imgPhoto: CollectedWestern powers accused Russia on Thursday of orchestrating a string of global cyber attacks including a bungled plot to hack the world’s chemical weapons watchdog in The Netherlands.The United States indicted seven alleged Russian members of the GRU military intelligence agency for targeting the Hague-based OPCW, the US Democratic party, world sports bodies and US nuclear energy company Westinghouse.The charges came as part of a coordinated pushback by allies Britain, The Netherlands, Canada and the United States against a series of hacking attempts by what London dubbed “pariah state” Russia.Russia scathingly accused the West of “spy mania”, with the Russian foreign office describing the accusations as “propaganda directed against our country”.In scenes reminiscent of a Cold War spy novel, Dutch security services said they had expelled four Russian GRU agents in April after they attempted a cyber-attack on the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, from a car parked in a nearby hotel.The OPCW was at the time probing the nerve agent poisoning of Russian ex-spy Sergei Skripal in Britain and an alleged chemical attack on the Syrian town of Douma by the Moscow-backed regime in Damascus.The Dutch and British prime ministers Mark Rutte and Theresa May in a joint statement accused the GRU of “disregard for global values” and lashed out at the Russian agency’s “unacceptable cyber activities”.Unacceptable cyber activitiesThe Russians were tracked by Dutch and British secret services from their arrival in Amsterdam on diplomatic passports in April, and then seen hiring a Citroen car which they parked outside the Marriott hotel next to the OPCW.When Dutch agents swooped on April 13 they found electronic equipment in the boot of the car to intercept the OPCW’s wifi and login codes, including an antenna hidden in the back of the car, facing the chemical weapons watchdog.Marriott manager Vincent Pahlplatz told AFP there was “no James Bond involved” and that the Russians had been arrested without the use of force as they emerged from a lift into the hotel lobby.Investigations found the Russians had originally taken a taxi from GRU barracks in Moscow to the airport, for which Dutch agents later found a receipt from their hotel. Some of their mobile phones were also activated in Moscow near the agency’s headquarters.“They were clearly not here on holiday,” said the head of the Dutch MIVD intelligence service, Major-General Onno Eichelsheim.A laptop belonging to one of the four was linked to Brazil, Switzerland and Malaysia—while the activities in Malaysia were related to the investigation into the 2014 shooting down of flight MH17 over Ukraine.It also revealed that the agents had also made searches for the OPCW-affiliated Spiez laboratory in Switzerland—which the Swiss last month said had been targeted by Russia.Dutch authorities released the Russian diplomatic passports of the four men identifying them as Oleg Sotnikov, Alexei Morenets, Alexei Minin and Yevgeny Serebryakov. They also showed photos of the men outside the hotel.Rutte said they had taken the “unusual and powerful” step of releasing details of an intelligence sting in order to bring Russia to account.“I do not think that Moscow has a nice day, because it is impossible for them to deny what has come out,” the Dutch PM told broadcaster NOS.The OPCW confirmed it had suffered “increased cyber-related activities” since the beginning of the year and had “undertaken measures to mitigate them”.Pariah stateThe four Russians allegedly involved in the OPCW attack were included in the list of seven men indicted by the US Justice Department.John Demers, US assistant attorney general for National Security, confirmed that known attack targets included the OPCW, football body FIFA, the World Anti-doping Agency (WADA) and Westinghouse.Demers said the operations dating back to 2014 “involved sophisticated, persistent and unauthorised access into the victims’ computer networks.”The case also overlaps with US Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe into Russian election meddling, with two of the men targeted on Thursday having featured in an earlier indictment on interference in the US polls.US intelligence says the GRU conducted the 2016 Democratic party hack in an effort to help Donald Trump win the presidency.Canada confirmed Thursday it believes itself to have been targeted by Russian cyber attacks, citing breaches at its centre for ethics in sports and at the Montreal-based WADA.Britain and Australia had just hours earlier pointed the blame directly at alleged GRU front operations such as Fancy Bear and APT 28 for the same string of worldwide attacks.The West’s coordinated response also saw NATO chief Jens Stoltenberg warning Russia to halt its “reckless” behaviour and the European Union condemning “aggressive” Russian spying.British defence secretary Gavin Williamson said that these were “not the actions of a great power, this is the actions of a pariah state”.Spy maniaRussia’s foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said that the allegations had been mixed together “indiscriminately”.“That’s a hell of a mix for a perfume,” she told reporters.London has accused two of GRU’s officers of poisoning former double-agent Skripal and his daughter Yulia in Salisbury in March, using a perfume bottle containing the powerful nerve agent Novichok.A Russian foreign ministry representative told AFP separately: “Western spy mania is gathering pace.”GRU stands for the Main Intelligence Directorate, Russia’s military intelligence agency which is one of Moscow’s three spy agencies along with the FSB security service and the SVR foreign intelligence agency.last_img read more

Is dark matter made of axions

first_img Citation: Is dark matter made of axions? (2008, March 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-03-dark-axions.html Explore further Tevatron experiments report latest results in search for Higgs boson Aaron Chou and William Wester run their Fermilab experiment looking for axions. Photo Credit: Femilab This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Wester, a scientist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois, worked closely with Aaron Chou, now at New York University, and a group of scientists from Fermilab and the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, to design an experiment to test the existence of axion-like particles within a certain range. Their results can be found in Physical Review Letters: “Search for Axionlike Particles Using a Variable-Baseline Photon-Regeneration Technique.”Axions are hypothetical particles that have a small mass in the milli-electronvolt (eV) range, making them 500 million times lighter than an electron. Additionally, an axion should have no spin. “Normally,” Chou points out, “we can only detect these kinds of particles with telescopes, looking out into space. And then it is only an indirect detection.” The idea was to create conditions allowing them to detect particles in the milli-eV range during a lab experiment.“For particles that interact strongly enough for us to detect, there are constraints on where they could exist or not,” Chou continues. “For the specific region of our experiment, no one would have thought to look into it without the PVLAS experiment.”Wester explains that the PVLAS collaboration did an experiment in which a signal that could have been an axion was detected. “We wanted to see if we could get the same results,” he says. The PVLAS experimenters eventually ruled out the signal after Wester and Chou started to work with their peers on this experiment. However, there were still some innovations that encouraged the Fermilab group to move forward.“We set things up a little differently,” Wester says. He points out that the Tevatron magnets used in the Fermilab experiment were stronger and better suited for experiments in the milli-eV range than those used in previous experiments. With the magnetic field in place, a laser was aimed down the middle. A “wall” was placed in the middle of the magnetic field as well. The magnetic field would possibly change some of the photons from the laser into axions. The wall would stop the photons, but the axions would emerge on the other side. “There were four different configurations,” Wester continues. “We also had the blocking mechanism placed off to the side to change the effective length of the magnetic field. We also did it with two different polarizations, vertical and horizontal.”Wester says that, unfortunately, the experiment found “no evidence of new particles.” But, he insists, “It turns out we’re able to exclude any possible particle of this type a little more stringently. It extended the region to be excluded.”Chou thinks that maybe, with a stronger magnetic field, it might be worth re-exploring this region. “The effect we are looking for gets stronger as the magnetic field does.”Both scientists are interested in the future possibilities. “There is a proposal out there that involves putting very precisely controlled optical cavities before and after the wall, and using stronger and longer magnets,” Wester explains.Chou also points out that the data from the Fermilab experiment is still being examined. “There is speculation about particles called chameleons, which take on the properties of their environments.” These chameleon particles would have a small mass in low energy density, and large mass in environments of high energy density. “We are continuing analysis to see if maybe we can find a chameleon particle.”In the search for dark matter particles, Wester is optimistic about the role he and his colleagues are playing. “We did a serious measurement and excluded a region,” he says. “If our small experiment helps heighten awareness and leads to more experimental efforts, even using other techniques as well, it will be a huge benefit that we have done this.”Find out more about the Fermi Lab experiment by visiting gammev.fnal.gov .Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. One of the mysteries of our universe is that of dark energy and matter. Scientists all over the world are attempting to discover what particles make up dark energy and matter. “Axions are one of the particles considered for dark matter,” William Wester tells PhysOrg.com. “We were hoping to get a signal proving that they exist with this experiment.”last_img read more