2020 Acura TLX PMC Edition goes to NSX finishing school ahead of

first_img Sedans Luxury cars Beyond the crazy-rich nano-pigment paint borrowed from the NSX, you might be wondering: What makes the 2020 Acura TLX PMC Edition so special? Starting with a conventional A-Spec all-wheel-drive model’s body-in-white, master technicians will hand assemble each example at PMC away from the regular production line, including adding all of the driveline, chassis and electrical components. In fact, so much of the assembly work on these models will take place at PMC that the facility will be its manufacturing location of origin.Each sedan then receives PMC-specific gloss-black 19-inch wheels with matching lug nuts, along with model-specific exterior finishes including a body-colored grille surround and 4-inch dual exhaust tips rendered in dark chrome. In an effort to add a bit more contrast and menace, the roof panel and door handles are finished in gloss black, as well.Enlarge ImageBadges? Apparently we do need some stinkin’ badges. Dan Howell/Acura Inside, TLX PMC Edition models are treated to black Milano leather seats incorporating black piping, red stitching and Alcantara faux-suede inserts. There’s matching red stitching on elsewhere in the cabin, along with a serialized PMC dash plaque. Uniquely, each TLX PMC Edition will be subjected to the same battery of quality-control tests as the NSX, which Acura says includes “dyno check, final paint inspection, rough-road simulation and water leak test.” Once the ink is dry on that checklist, completed models will be wrapped in a unique PMC car cover and shipped to dealers via enclosed car carrier. Each 2020 Acura TLX PMC will be hand assembled and undergo the NSX’s inspection process. Acura Interestingly, Acura has declined to make performance modifications to the TLX’s V6 drivetrain, meaning that the PMC Edition relies on the same 3.5-liter direct-injected unit and nine-speed automatic that many ordinary TLX models come equipped with. In conventional TLX guise, at least, that combination is good for 290 horsepower and 267 pound-feet of torque, and those same numbers will almost certainly apply here. (According to reports, Acura will exhume its Type S higher-performance model family soon, but it has yet to reveal which vehicle in its line will get the treatment first.)If around $50,000 sounds a bit rich for a TLX with special paint and trimmings, know that it’s not that far off the regular model’s pricing. While a base, front-wheel-drive TLX with Acura’s 2.4-liter I4 starts at an affordable $33,000 plus $995 for delivery, a comparable AWD A-Spec model with the optional V6 and Tech Package runs a shade over $46,000 before accessories. In other words, given the extra TLC and wicked paint job, the 2020 TLX PMC Edition may prove to be a sought-after upgrade for the brand’s faithful. As it is, the TLX is quietly outselling higher-profile sport sedans like the BMW 3 Series and Audi A4 in the US.Acura spokesman Chris Naughton confirms to Roadshow that the company won’t have any sort of special reservation or ordering process for the new model; customers can simply go to their local dealer and express their interest.2020 Acura TLX PMC EditionEnlarge ImageMaster technicians will build TLX PMC models from the body-in-white on up. Dan Howell/Acura If a sport sedan isn’t your speed, Acura is already confirming that this special-edition TLX will be followed up by a PMC Edition of the company’s popular MDX crossover SUV, and other models could be coming, too. “We designed the PMC not only to build NSX, but to give Acura the flexibility to explore handcrafted production of limited edition models. The TLX and MDX PMC Edition are the first to take advantage of this unique capability, and we intend to explore additional options,” said Jon Ikeda, Acura brand officer, in the official release.According to Acura spokesperson Chris Naughton, “The plan from the beginning was for PMC to be flexible… [to be] kind of a test bed for technology or processes… and also try new things that may not work well in a mass-production environment.” Indeed, in an interview with Roadshow, Naughton pointed to the Acura NSX GT3 as a further example of PMC’s flexibility — each race car’s body structure starts life at the plant. 2020-acura-tlx-pmc-edition-2Enlarge ImageThe TLX is just the first model to get this special PMC treatment. Acura’s MDX SUV will be next. Dan Howell/Acura In the case of the TLX PMC, Marysville Auto Plant’s paint shop simply isn’t set up to handle the car’s time- and process-intensive Valencia Red Pearl application process. Painting a normal TLX Advance or A-Spec is a one-day job, and it takes five days to fully bake the TLX PMC’s nano-pigment finish.If nothing else, these special models may serve to keep the master technicians at Acura’s Performance Manufacturing Center busy, and ensure their expensive tooling and paint shop remain active, too. Despite rave reviews, slow sales mean that NSX production volumes may not be sufficient to keep PMC humming. Last year, Acura sold just 581 examples of its six-figure gas-electric sports car. So far this year, the NSX is faring a bit better, with 67 units sold through March, a 17.9% improvement year over year. May 29 • 2020 Ford Escape: Everything there is to know 2019 Nissan Pathfinder Rock Creek Edition first drive: Its roots are showing Tags See All Share your voice Apr 19 • Check out the gory details in Honda’s IIHS crash-tested HR-V 20 Photos Acura Apr 19 • Volkswagen’s US CEO says around $25,000 would be a smart price for a small pickup Acura’s been keen to make the most of its NSX mid-engined supercar, and it’s been featuring the hybrid sports coupe in its recent print, television and digital ads alongside its more affordable offerings. The NSX’s rub-off will finally become a bit more literal at next week’s New York Auto Show, however, when the Japanese automaker unveils the 2020 Acura TLX PMC Edition seen here.Looking like a particularly vibrant TLX sedan, the Valencia Red Pearl-painted PMC Edition takes its name from the brand’s Performance Manufacturing Center in Marysville, Ohio, where final assembly of the model will be completed. (Regular TLX models are assembled at the nearby Marysville Auto Plant.) Just 360 examples of this special model we be built over six months starting this summer, with pricing estimated to be “around $50,000,” according to a statement released Thursday. reading • 2020 Acura TLX PMC Edition goes to NSX finishing school ahead of NY Auto Show More From Roadshow New York Auto Show 2019 0 Apr 19 • Acura MDX PMC Edition is a hand-assembled SUV in brilliant red paint New York Auto Show 2019 Acura • 2020 Volvo XC90 first drive: An improvement worth subscribing to 2020 Acura TLX PMC Edition rocks up ahead of NY Auto Show 2019 Nissan Maxima review: The ‘four-door sports car’ that isn’t Post a commentlast_img read more

Germany sets weekend record for solar power

first_img Citation: Germany sets weekend record for solar power (2012, May 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-05-germany-weekend-solar-power.html Explore further Image: Array Technologies That comparison is significant because, in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan, Germany abandoned nuclear energy endeavors. They shut down eight plants in favor of safer options and instead shouldered the task of further developing renewable energy sources. Allnoch said the data is based on information from the European Energy Exchange (EEX), based in Leipzig.Germany aggressively supports alternative energy sources and, by the year 2022, Germany expects to shutter its remaining nine nuclear power plants. The lack of these nuclear power facilities will create a gap in the country’s energy infrastructure, however. Germany is looking toward sources such as solar, wind and biomass.That support and commitment have come at a price. A 2012 Environment Ministry report showed that German taxpayers pay an extra four billion euros per year on top of their electricity bills to support solar power.Allnoch and his supporters would prefer to look at the “price” context in another way. “Even with all the safety precautions”, he said, there is still a risk at nuclear plants. “A global phaseout would be ideal but is not likely to happen soon.”As for costs, he said that while everyone worries about costs, the markets are shifting. He said once the uncertainty calms down, “we will see that we can do without nuclear power.”In relegating nuclear energy to the past, the road to replace it may be rocky, he added, but it is do-able. “We need to rise to this challenge.”The new record-breaking figures from Germany, however, do not quiet some energy experts who stress that without good storage strategies for excess power, such record-breaking numbers are not meaningful. They say the real point is to get consistently large percentages of power from renewable sources. German cabinet passes nuclear exit billcenter_img © 2012 Phys.Org (Phys.org) — Solar power plants in Germany have set a new record. “Never before anywhere has a country produced as much photovoltaic electricity,” said Norbert Allnoch, Germany’s director of the Institute of the Renewable Energy Industry in Muenster. The plants peaked at 22 gigawatts of output for a few hours over the weekend, on Friday and Saturday. The numbers are important in that they yielded almost half the country’s energy mid-day electricity needs. The 22 gigawatts is up from 14 GW a year ago. Also, this 22 gigawatts of output is equal to about 20 nuclear plants. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Physicists extend stochastic thermodynamics deeper into quantum territory

first_img The physicists, Anthony Bartolotta, a graduate student at Caltech, and Sebastian Deffner, Physics Professor at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, have written a paper on the Jarzynski equality for quantum field theories that will be published in an upcoming issue of Physical Review X.The work address one of the biggest challenges in fundamental physics, which is to determine how the laws of classical thermodynamics can be extended to the quantum scale. Understanding work and heat flow at the level of subatomic particles would benefit a wide range of areas, from designing nanoscale materials to understanding the evolution of the early universe.As Bartolotta and Deffner explain in their paper, in contrast to the large leaps made in the “microscopic theories” of classical and quantum mechanics during the past century, the development of thermodynamics has been rather stagnant over that time. Although thermodynamics was originally developed to describe the relation between energy and work, the theory traditionally applies only to systems that change infinitely slowly. In 1997, physicist Christopher Jarzynski at the University of Maryland College Park introduced a way to extend thermodynamics to systems in which heat and energy transfer processes occur at any rate. The fluctuation theorems, the most prominent of which is now called the Jarzynski equality, have made it possible to understand the thermodynamics of a wider range of smaller, yet still classical, systems.”Thermodynamics is a phenomenological theory to describe the average behavior of heat and work,” Deffner told Phys.org. “Originally designed to improve big, stinky heat engines, it was not capable of describing small systems and systems that operate far from equilibrium. The Jarzynski equality dramatically broadened the scope of thermodynamics and laid the groundwork for stochastic thermodynamics, which is a new and very active branch of research.” Thermodynamic laws that describe heat and energy are being extended to the quantum scale. Source: Pexels. Photograph by Paweł Kadysz Stochastic thermodynamics deals with classical thermodynamic concepts such as work, heat, and entropy, but on the level of fluctuating trajectories of atoms and molecules. This more detailed picture is particularly important for understanding thermodynamics in small-scale systems, which is also the realm of various emerging applications.It wasn’t for another decade, however, until the Jarzynski equality and other fluctuation theorems were extended to the quantum scale, at least up to a point. In 2007, researchers determined how quantum effects modify the usual interpretation of work. However, many questions still remain and overall, the area of quantum stochastic thermodynamics is still incomplete. Against this backdrop, the results of the new study represent a significant advance.”Now, in 2018 we have taken the next big step forward,” Deffner said. “We have generalized stochastic thermodynamics to quantum field theories (QFT). In a certain sense we have extended stochastic thermodynamics to its ultimate range of validity, since QFT is designed to be the most fundamental theory in physics.”One of the keys to the achievement was to develop a completely novel graph theoretic approach, which allowed the researchers to classify and combine the Feynman diagrams used to describe particle behavior in a new way. More specifically, the approach makes it possible to precisely calculate infinite sums of all the possible permutations (or arrangements) of disconnected subdiagrams describing the particle trajectories.”The quantity we were interested in, the work, is different than the quantities usually calculated by particle theorists and thus required a different approach,” Bartolotta said.The physicists expect that the results will allow other scientists to apply the fluctuation theorems to a wide variety of problems at the forefront of physics, such as in particle physics, cosmology, and condensed matter physics. This includes studying things like quantum engines, the thermodynamic properties of graphene, and the quark gluon plasma produced in heavy ion colliders—some of the most extreme conditions found in nature.In the future, the physicists plan to generalize their approach to a wider variety of quantum field theories, which will open up even further possibilities. What is quantum in quantum thermodynamics? More information: Anthony Bartolotta and Sebastian Deffner. “Jarzynski Equality for Driven Quantum Field Theories.” Physical Review X. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevX.8.011033. Also at arXiv:1710.00829 [cond-mat.stat-mech] Citation: Physicists extend stochastic thermodynamics deeper into quantum territory (2018, February 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-physicists-stochastic-thermodynamics-deeper-quantum.html © 2018 Phys.org Journal information: Physical Review X This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Physicists have extended one of the most prominent fluctuation theorems of classical stochastic thermodynamics, the Jarzynski equality, to quantum field theory. As quantum field theory is considered to be the most fundamental theory in physics, the results allow the knowledge of stochastic thermodynamics to be applied, for the first time, across the full range of energy and length scales. Explore furtherlast_img read more