Video: Best of Garage Cam — Food CIty 500

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Classic Santana Lineup Announces Debut Performance And New Single ‘Blues Magic’

first_imgScheduled for release on April 15, Santana IV will reunite virtuoso guitar player Carlos Santana with bandmates from his classic 1971 lineup. The recording, which features Gregg Rolie (keyboards, lead vocals), Neal Schon (guitar, vocals), Michael Carabello (percussion) and Michael Shrieve (drums) will be the first time in 41 years that this five-piece has come together. The album also receives contributions from percussionist Karl Perazzo, bassist Benny Rietveld and vocalist Ronald Isley.In lieu of this momentous occasion, Santana has revealed that the band will be playing their first show since 1973 at the House of Blues Las Vegas at the Mandalay Bay on March 21. The show will also be taped for for an upcoming DVD and TV release. Pre-sale tickets for the event go on sale Saturday, March 5 at 10 AM PST, with public on sale beginning March 14 at 9 AM. More ticketing details can be found here.Fans can get a sneak peak of Santana IV here with the new slow-burning single Santana has just released today titled “Blues Magic,” which you can stream below:For a further look inside the making of the new album, check out the new teaser trailer via Guitar World here.last_img read more

Jack White Is Planning To Play The First Vinyl Record In Outer Space [Report]

first_imgThere’s no denying that Jack White has an obsession with vinyl. His company Third Man Records is essentially built off of that obsession, as White continues to support talented musicians and preserve musical legacies through the creation of vinyl. His Third Man Records booth made history when it became the quickest performing-to-vinyl pressing ever, but it seems White is not content with keeping his vinyl on the ground.In a new video posted to Jack White’s Facebook page, the musician writes “July 30th, Third Man Records is going to make vinyl history again” in gold letters, set over a background of stars in outer space. From there, a gold vinyl twirls its way into the foreground, revealing its title: Carl Sagan’s “A Glorious Dawn,” an album released on Third Man Records in 2009.Carl Sagan was a noted astronomer, perhaps best known for his series Cosmos that was popular in the 1980’s, and recently revitalized with Neil deGrasse Tyson as host. Some of his spoken excerpts were selected and released on the “A Glorious Dawn” album posthumously.When you couple that with some older interviews, it seems highly likely that White is going to boldly go where no man has gone before, and try to play a vinyl record in space for the first time ever. In a 2012 conversation with astronaut Buzz Aldrin in Interview Magazine, White talks about a “secret project” to accomplish this first-ever feat. White says, “We want to launch a balloon that carries a vinyl record player, and possibly that Carl Sagan record, and figure out a way to drop the needle with all that turbulence up there and ensure that it will still play.”Has White figured it out? I guess we’ll find out on July 30th. Watch the video below.last_img read more

moe. Superfan Details The Incredible Journey To His 200th Show At Red Rocks

first_imgIf you are lucky enough to find someone or something that fills your life with light, frees you from your bonds and burdens, and gives you the inspiration to carry on, then you’d be a fool not to embrace it with all your heart. For eighteen years, from the first time I experienced the band called moe., to my recent magical 200th show at the revered Red Rocks Amphitheatre, I have done all I can to lose myself in the musical spell they cast. It’s safe to say you wouldn’t be reading these words if it wasn’t for the five friends from upstate New York and the wizardry they work.My name is Rex Thomson, and I’m a writer/photographer/videographer working for Live For Live Music. I’ve been given this opportunity to step out from behind the lens and the third person narrative voice, to get a bit personal on a topic that means the word to me: the band moe. For almost two decades, bassist Robert Derhak, guitarists Al Schnier and Chuck Garvey, percussionist Jim Loughlin and drummer Vinnie Amico have been performing the sound track of my life. Thanks to legendary guitar tech Frank Robbins, I even have some of the very tools they used to make that music during my 200th show!No one ends up seeing a band hundreds of times without a damn good reason, and I certainly have a few. First and foremost, the transformation I feel in myself during a show… it’s like being scrubbed clean of all of life’s cruddy residue on a spiritual level. I remember a swirling guitar crescendo at the tail end of a “Rebubula” that made me spread my arms wide to the waves of ringing perfection buffeting me in the crowd. It was completely involuntary, and I watched as if from beyond myself as it happened. It was bliss.Here’s an outstanding version of “Rebubula” from Mountain Jam, after it won a fan contest to pick a song for the set:Bliss is a pretty powerful concept, but until then it had been just that, a thought known but not understood. I’ve since learned of how powerful an effect your sense of hearing has on things like emotions and epiphanies through lots of science words. Long story short, humanity used to keep its collected knowledge and share its most basic concepts through song. We are programmed on a primal level to receive information on a mental and emotional level through music.Whatever subconscious burst of information I receive from those five minds fills me with a lasting inspiration that makes my every thought clearer and intention easier to form. Mixing laughter, fury and jaw dropping displays of musical skill and dexterity, moe. is sending out all the listener can handle and more. The rapport they share onstage makes it all the easier for fans to tune in and join the fun on the more ethereal planes.Without going to far into my final reason the band moe. means so much to me yet, I will say that some cognitive issues I face are all but gone after seeing the band, before slowly returning. Simply put, I am a better functioning, feeling human being after I spend some time seeing moe. play.I am here to tell you that not everyone finds perfect inspiration, but when it hits you, it changes everything. After first seeing the band in 1999, I made sure to catch them at any festival or show that came within striking distance. As the years flew by, the range I was willing to travel grew exponentially, all in an effort to plug into the white hot electric flow I first felt years ago. Saved ticket stubs piled up, and I continually had to find larger and larger receptacles for my treasures.In 2009, an opportunity to photograph the band’s annual Summer Camp Music Festival in Illinois for a fly-by-night outlet gave me my first taste of life BEYOND the front row at a major event. My tendency to go on face melting mental adventures during their shows met the equally powerful experience of focusing on the visual spectacle of the lights and intense performances being laid down by the band and my fate was sealed. After three straight days of massive sets of music, all watched from about five feet away, I knew what I was going to be doing for the rest of my life.I quickly found out that I was nowhere near alone in my burgeoning devotion, emotional uplift or even willingness to travel. Though I was aware that moe., like many bands had a devoted traveling fan base, I hadn’t looked up long enough to learn the faces and names. My new gig changed all that, and the more moe. shows I went to across the nation, the more of the same faces I saw. The best part? They were all slipping into their own beatific trances as the music swept them away.There are a couple of terms used for diehard moe. fans. “moe.ron” is one of the most common, and part of the band and fans shared love of puns. The other, “famoe.ly.” The difference between them can blur, and in the end, the true meaning is love. These are people who share in something that is nearly beyond words, bonded not by race or creed but by mutual understanding and emotion and I was now a happy soldier in the army.Over the next five years, it would be fair to say I went a special kind of crazy in regards to moe. When the band hosted the annual moe.down festival for their most rabid fans in upstate New York, a tradition formed around a last day election for “Mayor of moe.down” or “Mayor of moe.ville,” depending on who you ask, time of day and sobriety levels. I decided that between my work as a pretend music journalist, my occasional working with bands and promoters, and my connection to the scene itself, I was the first actually qualified candidate for office.The details of my five and a half year campaign across the country are not only too long to go through here, honestly…it’s kinda scary to type. But behind my weird endorsements……full blown campaign commercials……and even the stupid sign I lugged across creation….…there was a secret plan. Wherever I went, whether I approached them or they approached me, I asked people, “Have you ever heard of a band named moe.?” And if they hadn’t, I either urged them to check them out or gave them some of the over two thousand burned CDs I have burned from their live shows and carry with me whenever I can.Through my… zeal… I have ended up interacting with the band on a personal level from time to time. I’ve gotten to request songs for acoustic performances……gotten the band to explain things like how they write set lists……even spent a half hour getting Jim Loughlin to go through his entire percussive toy repertoire!Basically, I’ve tried to make myself useful, and I think I’ve done a good job. Feels like the least I could do, really. I try not to let my crazy appreciation of what they do get too scary for them when I am around, but I am fairly certain they have a crew member in place to taser me into submission if I get out of hand. Can’t really say I blame them.Eventually I was appointed Mayor… but I didn’t stop spreading the love and I never will. When you stumble across something that resounds within you with such a positive, energizing level, all you want to do is bask in the magic and share the love, and that’s what I’ve done. You can read my review of the Red Rocks show that was my much ballyhoo’d 200th HERE. You can read my review of the spectacular follow up show the next night in Boulder HERE. Hell, you can read about the show they played with Yonder Mountain String Band a few days later in Wisconsin HERE.But just reading those reviews won’t tell you the real story. It doesn’t mention that, to see that Wisconsin show, I had to drive about 17 straight hours out of my way, or that I had to sleep in rest stops due to the remoteness of the location and my needing to get to the next event. I don’t do this for the money. I do this for the life and love moe., has inspired me to live. And seriously, when I say they gave me life, I mean it.My mom taught me to always have three reasons to do something, and my third reason for loving the music of moe. like I do is a dozy. My life, like most, has been fraught with obstacles, like most. Mine have taken the form of some rather bleak medical prognoses that hang over me like the sword of Damocles. I’ll say this bluntly: I would not be alive today if it wasn’t for the spark moe. ignited inside me. The litany of surgeries, crises and moments of pure terror I have faced would have crushed me if I didn’t have their song in my heart.To me, a moe. show isn’t a simple entertainment, though there is certainly nothing wrong with that. That’s why they play, after all. They want to share what they can do with the world, and, thanks to my job, I get to help them do just that. I blew past my 200th show and am already at 203, with three more lined up for next month. My next goal is to reach show number 365, so I can know I spent a year feeling that same magic I felt all those years ago, but in the end, numbers aren’t what matters to me.What matters to me is building the fire of love and hope inside me burning bright, to face the long and scary nights ahead. In our primitive days we sang around the fire and danced into the night. Those rituals live on today. Bands like moe. roam the land giving us all the chance to build the strength to face the dark and the joy to truly embrace the light.Special Bonus! As usual al. took a moe.ment to thank the fans and crew on the night of my 199th show, and sent a little love back my way before nailing a wicked weekend closing cover of Cream’s “White Room.” Dig it!last_img read more

Widespread Panic Shares Pro-Shot “Soul Kitchen” & “Paranoid” Bust Outs From Halloween Show [Watch]

first_imgBeloved jam band Widespread Panic settled into the 1STBANK Arena in Broomfield, CO for a three-night Halloween celebration, treating fans to an “Angels & Devils” themed show throughout two sets of music. The band took the opportunity to bust out several long-lost covers from years past, including a great two song run for their first encore.The band dug deep into past Halloween shows and pulled out The Doors’ “Soul Kitchen” and Black Sabbath’s “Paranoid,” playing the songs for the first time since 2000 and 1987, respectively. Fortunately for us, WSP has shared pro-shot footage of the two songs, which you can watch below.Panic is off the road until a three-night run in Nashville, TN for New Year’s Eve. Though the band has promised to reduce touring in 2017, they have shows scheduled for Panic En La Playa and SweetWater 420 festival next year. Check out the Halloween setlist from PanicStream, below.Setlist: Widespread Panic at 1STBANK Center, Broomfield, CO – 10/30/16Set 1: Waiting For The Bus* > Jesus Just Left Chicago, Happy, Angels on High, Good People, Heaven, Angels Don’t Sing The Blues, Hallelujah, Tall Boy, Ain’t Life Grand (64 mins)Set 2: Theme Slippin’ Into Darkness**^, Machine > Barstools and Dreamers***, Vampire Blues****, Henry Parson’s Died, Beat On The Brat*****, I Wanna Be Sedated*****, Chilly Water > I Walk On Guilded Splinters > Bust It Big > Chilly Water, Lithium****** (83 mins)Encore 1: Soul Kitchen*******, Paranoid********Encore 2:  Postcard, End of the Show (21 mins)Notes: * FTP ~ 10.31.09 ~ Austin** FTP ~ 10.31.02 ~ NOLA / ^ Steve Lopez on Percussion*** w/ Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin) rap**** FTP ~ 10.31.05 ~ Las Vegas***** FTP ~ 10.31.03 ~ NYC / The Ramones (LTP 880 shows)****** FTP ~ 10.30.16 ~ Broomfield / Nirvana******* FTP ~ 10.28.00 ~ NOLA / The Doors (LTP 1,140 shows)******** FTP ~ 10.31.87 ~ Athens, Ga / Black Sabbath (LTP 2,809 shows)last_img read more

Joe Russo’s Almost Dead Shares Audio Of 12/30 Capitol Theatre Show

first_imgAfter spending two nights in Brooklyn – one scheduled, and the other impromptu – Joe Russo’s Almost Dead made their way out to Port Chester, NY for the first of two nights at The Capitol Theatre. Almost Dead continues to impress fans with their one-of-a-kind take on the Grateful Dead. While the Brooklyn Bowl show on 12/29 focused more on the Dead’s material, the band took more liberties with the catalog and worked outside the box for a great performance.Featuring special guest performances from Alecia Chakour, the band drilled through Grateful Dead classics, along with a rendition of “The Weight” by The Band, and debut cover of “Hood Doo Voo Doo” by Wilco/Billy Bragg/Woody Guthrie. The band has shared the soundboard audio from this performance, which you can enjoy below:Setlist: Joe Russo’s Almost Dead | The Capitol Theatre | Port Chester, NY | 12/30/16Set 1 (8:45PM – 10:12PM)King Bee Jam + ->The Eleven @ (All) >BIODTL # (SM) >Feel Like A Stranger (SM) >Cumberland Blues $ (All) ->The Stranger (Two Souls In Communion) (AC)Estimated Prophet (SM) ->Space ->Bird Song Jam + ->Day Tripper % (TH) ->Bird Song ^ (TH) ->King Solomon’s Marbles & ->Bird Song Reprise + (TH)Set 2 (10:49PM – 12:??AM)Til The Morning Comes + (All + AC) ->Passenger + (SM & AC) ->Viola Lee Blues * (All) ->Jam ->Uncle John’s Band (All) ->Becky @@ ->Uncle John’s Band Reprise (All) ->Viola Lee Blues Reprise (All) ->Hoo Doo Voo Doo ++ (SM) ->Lovelight * (AC) ->Shakedown Street ## (TH) >Throwing Stones $$ (SM)ENC: The Weight (All + AC)AC is Alecia Chakour (Tedeschi Trucks Band) on Vocals+ – First Time Played by Almost [email protected] – With at Throwin’ Stones Tease (TH)# – 30 Beat BIODTL for Dec 30th$ – With Feel Like A Stranger & Hoedown (Aaron Copeland) Teases (MB) & a Lovelight Jam (Band)% – First Time Played by Almost Dead, Beatles Cover, Unfinished, 2 verses were sung^ – With a Day Tripper (The Beatles) Tease (MB)& – Unfinished* – With Cochemea Gastelum (Dap Kings) on Bari [email protected]@ – Benevento Russo Duo Cover, not played since 2015-10-03, a gap of 46 shows. Basically only Joe & Marco played on this song.++ – Wilco/Billy Bragg/Woody Guthrie Cover, First Time Played by Almost Dead.## – With a MB Piano Solo, an On The Road Again Tease (Band), a “That’s All” (Phil Collins) Tease – I think, it might be something else (Band) & an unknown jam (Band) that I may be able to figure out.$$ – With an Unknown Tease (TH)[Setlist via Peter Costello // Joe Russo’s Almost Dead Facebook]last_img read more

Voodoo Dead Kicks Off In DC With Oteil, Jeff Chimenti, Steve Kimock, Jackie Greene, & More [Audio/Video]

first_imgAny Grateful Dead fan who has visited New Orleans Jazz Fest knows Voodoo Dead, the annual late night show that mixes New Orleans influences with Grateful Dead music. This year, an elite group of all-star musicians are taking Voodoo Dead to the Northeast as part of a four-night run that hits venues in Washington DC, New York, and the Philadelphia area.Last night began the tour with Steve Kimock and Jackie Greene on guitars, Oteil Burbridge on bass, Jeff Chimenti on keys and Wally Ingram on the drums at The Hamilton in Washington, D.C. NOLA guitarist/vocalist Papa Mali was also on deck to sit in on a few favorites.Thanks to taper Alex Leary, you can listen to the full show below:Furthermore, YouTube user Tom Libera was on site to record some video.Big Railroad BluesBerthaCassidy > New Speedway BoogieI Know You RiderVoodoo Dead returns to The Hamilton tonight, before heading on to Irving Plaza in New York, NY on February 10th and the Ardmore Music Hall in Ardmore, PA on February 11th.Setlist: Voodoo Dead | The Hamilton | Washington D.C. | 2/8/17Philadelphia Mambo, Big Railroad Blues (JGe), Bertha* (JGe on keys w/ JC), That’s What Love Will Make You Do* (JGe) > Cassidy* (JGe) > New Speedway Boogie* (PM) > I Know You Rider* (PM)Encore: I Shall Be Released (JGe)* – w/ Papa Mali[H/T JamBase]last_img read more

Space Carnival Premieres New Studio Session Video For “Prince Rebus”

first_imgIthaca based psychedelic jam quartet Space Carnival recently announced an extensive Spring Tour. Starting with a week-long run in central New York, including a date with Broccoli Samurai in Oneonta, Space Carnival will then be touring for two weeks in the Midwest, sharing stages with Desmond Jones and Digeometric before coming back to the Northeast for a run of regional shows. Among these is April 20th at The Westcott in Syracuse, NY with Infected Mushroom, April 12th at The Haunt in Ithaca, NY with Dopapod, April 13th at Bourbon & Branch in Philadelphia, PA with Formula 5, and April 28th at The Hangar in Troy, NY with Mister F.Check out the full list of dates below as well as a video of their new song “Prince Rebus” from their recent Sub Rosa Session at Sub Cat Studios in Syracuse NY.Space Carnival Tour Dates3.14 | Rochester, NY | Abilene3.15 | Syracuse, NY | Al’s Wine & Whiskey3.16 | Oneonta, NY | The Waterfront3.18 | Norwich, NY | Rita’s Tavern3.19 | Hector, NY | Two Goats Brewing3.29 | Westerville, OH | Fenders3.30 | Louisville, KY | Time & Space3.31 | Kokomo, IN | The Coterie4.01 | St. Louis, MO | Pop’s Blue Moon4.02 | Overland Park, KS | Local Tap4.03 | Des Moines, IA | Lefty’s4.06 | Chicago, IL | Emporium Wicker Park4.07 | Mount Pleasant, MI | Rubble’s Bar4.08 | Grand Rapids, MI | Tip Top4.09 | Cincinnati, OH | Stanley’s Pub4.12 | Ithaca, NY | The Haunt4.13 | Philadelphia, PA | Bourbon & Branch4.14 | Nyack, NY | Olive’s4.15 | Port Jeff Station, NY | LI Pour House4.20 | Syracuse, NY | Westcott Theatre4.21 | Plattsburgh, NY | The Monopole4.22 | Burlington, VT | Radio Bean4.26 | Portland, ME | Flask4.27 | Manchester, NH | Penuche’s4.28 | Troy, NY | The Hangarlast_img read more

Widespread Panic, Trey Anastasio Band, Ween, & moe. Captivate SweetWater 420 Festival [Audio/Photos]

first_imgEdit this setlist | More Widespread Panic setlists Edit this setlist | More Trey Anastasio Band setlists Edit this setlist | More Ween setlistsPhotographer Christian Stewart was also on site, capturing the moments all weekend long. Check out his full gallery below. SweetWater 420 Festival dove head first into the jam scene this year, and we couldn’t be happier. At the Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta, GA, heavyweights Widespread Panic, Trey Anastasio Band, Ween (with a set-opening “Roses Are Free” !!!), and moe. had the festival carry the torch for spring’s first jam-packed weekend. Performances from Trombone Shorty, Lettuce, Twiddle, Dopapod, Jackie Greene, Talib Kweli, Break Science, SunSquabi, The Werks, BIG Something, and People’s Blues of Richmond only heightened the experience.Thanks to taper Matt Moricle, you can enjoy festival set audio from moe. and Dopapod. Load remaining imageslast_img read more

A Tribute To Butch Trucks On His 70th Birthday, With Thoughts On Col. Bruce Hampton

first_imgToday would have been Butch Trucks‘ 70th birthday. The legendary drummer and original member of the Allman Brothers Band tragically died earlier this year, a reality I haven’t been able to stop thinking about — especially after experiencing the loss of Col. Bruce Hampton last week. Butch was my “godfather,” while Col. Bruce Hampton my dear friend. Two of rock and roll’s greatest influences have passed on, but their stories and legacies will always endure. The key to grieving has been to celebrate life — to share memories, music, and all the people that connect them together.When people tell me they’re sorry for my loss, I often respond that it’s a greater loss for rock and roll and everyone that is a part of that world. It’s occurred to me more recently how instrumental Butch and Bruce were to our community, to our scene. The outpour of stories from fans and musicians alike prove just how accessible, how meaningful they both were to our circle. The relationship between Butch and Bruce goes back as far as the beginning of the Allman Brothers Band; without one or the other, it seems as though each would not be the same.Oteil Burbridge Pens Touching Tribute To His Musical Mentor, The Late Col. Bruce HamptonAs a tribute to Butch’s birthday, the big 7-0, I’d like to share the speech that I delivered at his memorial service in Macon, Georgia on February 20, 2017 at the Cox Capitol Theatre. It was an honor to share my portion of his story amongst the many greats in the room, though I’ll admit a little intimidating to speak alongside Warren Haynes, Johnny Podell, Oteil Burbridge, Jaimoe, Kirk West, and the familial relatives that helped color Butch’s life.But I knew it had to be done. My story wasn’t like any of theirs.When Vaylor asked me to speak today, I was honored — but slightly disoriented. I’m not a blood relative, I never played music with him. I don’t have any stories from the road. He’s just a man who demanded I call him “Uncle Butch” for the last twenty years of my life. I guess that’s pretty special.I met the Trucks family when I was seven years old after they moved to my hometown of Palm Beach. It never really made sense to me why they lived there. I don’t think he made sense of it either, but it brought Butch together with my Dad who became one of his closest friends and mentors. That seemed to be a life-changing friendship for all of us.As my Dad’s been there to help the Trucks family through all this, it’s given me a chance to see how great of an impact that relationship has had on my personal life. Sure, it’s pretty cool that my first concert ever was Frogwings [a band made up of Jimmy Herring, Derek Trucks, Oteil Burbridge, Kofi Burbridge, Edwin McCain, Marc Quiñones, and Butch Trucks] and that I’ve seen the Allman Brothers play more times than I can count, but all those experiences came with great life lessons.Growing up backstage with the Allman Brothers Band provided me with a lifetime of unteachable moments. Where to sit, where to stand, when to hustle; who to ask, who not to ask, when to know your place. Thanks to people like Bert [Holman] and Stacey [Maranz], I learned the etiquette of the industry surrounded by legends. With respect being the overarching theme, I learned very quickly how to act around others.What Butch taught me most, though, was how to act on my own. Every gift he gave me was signed “Eat A Peach” and it wasn’t until my college poetry class that I truly understood what that meant, at least, in theory, according to Butch: it was inspired by a quote from Duane Allman that perhaps came from a line of T.S. Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.”After going back and forth in his own mind about making a decision inspired by love, the narrator asks: “Shall I part my hair behind? Do I dare to eat a peach?” In this context, the peach — whatever the thinker chooses to let it represent — becomes a metaphor for life, for risk. It is something one must experience before growing old.To eat a peach is a choice. While the fruit is inevitably messy, it is equally delectable. It gets stuck in your teeth, drips down your shirt, and sticks to your hands, but we still choose to eat them for the satisfaction that we crave. If you dare to eat a peach, you are willing to accept the outcome. Dichotomously, a peach is both sweet and sour, soft and hard, smooth and fuzzy. It’s delicious, but you must eat it with full willingness to get messy – because, you know, you can always change your shirt.Whatever the peach might represent to you, it’s worth taking the first bite.The quote that supposedly inspired the album name came from an interview question about helping the revolution, to which Duane responded: “There ain’t no revolution, only evolution, but every time I’m in Georgia I ‘eat a peach’ for peace.”I know Butch evolved in a profound way after Duane died. A conversation doesn’t go by without citing a reference or telling a story that’s Skydog-related. I may only have been around for the last two decades, but I still reaped the benefits of the wisdom from a man I never knew — and so did all of my friends and family who ever met or spoke with Butch.That’s one of the things that made him so special; he might act like he knows far more than everyone on the planet, but Duane Allman was the exception. Those two shared a mind, and I’m honored to have tapped into it as much as I have.Keeping with the rhythms of life, Butch’s influence on me is never-ending. He flicked a switch in me when I first saw him play. I quickly realized that music had the ingredients to change a life. As I grew older, I centered this passion to become part of my career.My experience in the music industry truly began when Butch started his Roots Rock Revival camp in Big Indian, NY. With Oteil, Luther, Cody, and more of the extended rock and roll family, I found the light of what it means to bring people together — for the love of the music. That camp started almost four years ago, and I saw Butch grow brighter and brighter every summer because of it. He was the happiest I’d ever seen him, ever. And he changed so many lives by doing what he did.It’s hard to think that a soul that loud could just disappear. I’ve never met a bigger character in my entire life, and I know that his voice will live on through each and every one that he’s ever met.It is my life mission to spread his gospel, to eat a peach for peace, and to honor him in my decisions, both personally and professionally. I’m so grateful to have met all of you as a result of my incomparable relationship with this man.After Butch’s service, I had dinner with Col. Bruce. He brought us to this odd, off-the-highway restaurant with fluorescent lights that served both Indian and Mediterranean food. They were about to close but stayed open for only us, and greated us all with an emphatic “Happy Birthday” upon entering. It was an establishment Bruce has faithfully dined at for several decades; it turned out to be one of the best meals I’ve ever had, of course.Instead of mourning the immensely difficult month we’d all experienced, Bruce showed us videos of a 90-something-year-old pianist that he’d found at a club somewhere and was excited to book shows with—he ended up being one of the many on stage at Hampton 70. There was more excitement than sadness in Bruce’s voice, something that confused me at the time. It’s more obvious to me now that he was the kind of spirit that lived just a few steps ahead of the present, and that inspired me to do the same. After all, losing is gaining, right?Related: Stranger Than Fiction: The Cosmic Curtain Call Of Col. Bruce HamptonLast week in New Orleans, a group of musicians came together to celebrate the lives of Butch Trucks and Col. Bruce Hampton for a show at One Eyed Jacks. Warren Haynes and Jeff Sipe unexpectedly joined Duane Trucks, Oteil Burbridge, Eric Krasno, Danny Louis, Scott Metzger, and several others as the Daze Between Band to honor the two influencers, and quite frankly, to play through the emotions of their loss.In going through the stages of grief with Butch, the death of Col. Bruce Hampton cemented and suspended a feeling of reality. As difficult a thought it is to grasp, losing these two mentors has been a perspective-shifting experience for many. I frequently find myself searching for truth within the same dimensions of heartache, but have found solace in music and the celebration of life. This seems to be a communal sentiment, as the energy from the room catapulted into a marvelous gesture to the sky.While “legends” in their own realm, Butch Trucks and Col. Bruce Hampton were staple spirits to the community. They provided much more than music and are two of the few exceptions in rock and roll to ever willingly do so. Everyone who has had the delight of their personal influence will say the same.Happy Birthday, Butch, the world misses you so, so much.[photos by Michael Bloom Photography]last_img read more