European Champions Cup analysis: Brendon O’Connor makes excellent Leicester Tigers debut

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Dream debut: Brendon O’Connor goes over for a try against Stade Francais at Welford Road Matt Kvesic and Will Fraser have been touted to challenge Chris Robshaw for a post-World Cup berth at openside. More of the same from O’Connor and he will join that category of genuine contenders.Thank you to BT Sport for the match footage. …and O’Connor is on hand to receive an offload on the inside:This understanding is all the more impressive given O’Connor’s lack of game-time alongside his new colleagues. And there was another piece of cooperation to a turnover on the half-hour mark.Double-teamingDespite spending the majority of the opening period defending, Stade found themselves 8-0 ahead. A penalty handed them territory and there was a chance to build more pressure. Then O’Connor pounced:After handing off Cole and Tom Youngs, Sylvain Nicolas is cut down:Before the Stade support arrives, O’Connor does not have to adhere to ruck regulations. He blocks Nicolas’ attempt to pass backwards……deflecting the ball upwards where Tom Youngs can complete the turnover:A similar play got Leicester off the mark.Risk rewardedOne of Richie McCaw‘s defining traits over 148 All Blacks appearances has been how he has challenged the way referees interpret the ruck area.After this O’Connor turnover……which led to a try for Vereniki Goneva……BT pundit Brian O’Driscoll queried the legality of O’Connor’s actions. He argued, by this law definition, that a ruck had been formed prior to him scooping the ball off the deck:It is certainly close. From this angle, we can see Smith engaging with Stade hooker Laurent Panis as O’Connor is bending to pick up the ball.Another vantage point shows O’Connor’s steal to occur almost simultaneously to the ruck forming:Referee Lacey is forced into a decision and sides with Leicester. O’Connor pushes the envelope and pulls off a try-scoring, streetwise pilfer.More link workPopping up in midfield from an overthrown Stade lineout, O’Connor exhibits his handling skills and comfort with ball in hand with a simple take-and give:Receiving a pass from Owen Williams……he straightens to draw Parisse before putting the effervescent Smith into space:After half-time, O’Connor became even more conspicuous.Try on Tigers debutBeing in the right place at the right time is rarely coincidental in rugby. Opportunism and work-rate is a healthy combination, and O’Connor profited from both seconds into the second half:As Ben Youngs kicks, O’Connor is stationed on the fringe of the ruck:Even so, he makes up the ground to capitalise on the confusion caused by Adam Thompstone and Mike Fitzgerald. His pick-up at pace is exquisite:O’Connor was on hand from the next restart to keep Leicester in the ascendancy, intercepting a kick that did not go the required 10 metres and driving up beyond halfway:Around 10 minutes later, nimble footwork and deceptive power force a penalty from Stade following this O’Connor carry:Ben Youngs would tap, go and seal Leicester’s bonus point, something that could prove vital in the final shake-up of a pool that also includes Munster.The ensuing restart offered a final image of O’Connor’s perpetual motion.Parting shotAlready involved in four turnovers by this point, O’Connor made it five here:The most striking thing about this sequence is O’Connor’s energy. He begins on the 10-metre line……and back-pedals to lift Barrow:O’Connor then slips to the right of the breakdown to shield Ben Youngs from any potential charge-downs:Clearance made, he tears towards Hugo Bonneval. Tom Youngs makes a tackle on the Stade full-back and O’Connor is over the ball……and fights hard to stay on his feet and provide a target for Marcos Ayerza to latch on and drive through:When the ball emerges, it is on the Tigers side:Cockerill’s note of caution on O’Connor’s international prospects was totally understandable. Earning the respect of everyone at Welford Road – fans, players and back-room staff – has to be the primary priority.But this was more than merely a promising beginning. It was a classy performance from a clever player dripping in qualities that England need, namely influential breakdown nous.center_img Leicester Tigers gave an emphatic statement on Friday night with their 33-20 European Champions Cup defeat of Stade Francais at Welford Road. And an assertion of intent was uttered with a New Zealand accent.Attacking with pace and ambition in an unmistakable two-wave structure, the hosts displayed all the hallmarks of new head coach Aaron Mauger.Perennially underrated Matt Smith was excellent at inside centre, marrying an unfussy but effective passing game with pure tenacity. Close-season signings Mike Williams and Lachlan McCaffrey brought muscle and industry. Brendon O’Connor made his club debut too.In 15 Super 15 outings for a struggling Blues outfit earlier this year, he had accumulated 148 tackles, 104 carries and 15 turnovers. The 26 year-old went toe-to-toe with all-action Ardie Savea in last month’s ITM Championship final, helping his side Hawke’s Bay to a thrilling 26-25 win over Wellington. Via a grandmother, O’Connor also qualifies for England.After Friday’s match, Richard Cockerill branded talk of a Test role “premature”. For now, that may be true. Even so, charged with succeeding Julian Salvi in a line of superb Leicester opensides, O’Connor delivered an outstanding performance to begin life as a Tiger. Here is a run-down of his contributions.Testing the waterO’Connor proved an utter nuisance at the tackle area from the first kick-off. Follow him here as Morne Steyn fields from Owen Williams:Typically combative, Tom Youngs rushes up to execute the first hit. On the shoulder of his hooker, O’Connor challenges for the ball.He is shunted away by the combined clear-out of Patrick Sio and Meyer Bosman but, as the slideshow below demonstrates, he bounces out into the defensive line:This trend, of returning to his feet and getting back into the game quickly, continues throughout O’Connor’s showing.Resourcing rucksDuring the World Cup, Australia‘s trio of Scott Fardy, Michael Hooper and David Pocock were lauded for disrupting opposition breakdowns. Just as important to the Wallabies’ results though, was fast ruck-speed – recycling possession rapidly.Here, following up as Mike Williams carries strongly, O’Connor darts over the ball to allow Ben Youngs a pristine platform:A few phases later, Mat Tait finds himself caught in a far weaker position. The full-back is shackled behind the gain-line and seems to be isolated from any support.Thankfully for Tigers, O’Connor is on hand to help out:Bypassing the front line of runners, Owen Williams hits Tait in behind:The Stade defence reads the pattern well. However, O’Connor adjusts his angle as Tait beats the first defender……and latches on, almost sling-shotting his teammate through contact……before straddling the ball, shielding it from any counter-ruckers to ensure Leicester can remain on the attack:Cockerill spoke to the BT Sport commentators midway through the first half and suggested O’Connor was feeling his way into the game. In truth, his subtle interventions just kept coming throughout his 65-minute shift.Moving it awayTop 14 champions Stade had decent field position from this lineout, but Pascal Pape spilled at the tail.Following a slick pick-up from Dan Cole, O’Connor’s unselfish transfer to Owen Williams allows a key decision-maker some space:Seemingly innocuous, the short pass sums up the flanker’s entire showing – unselfish and under the radar, yet essential to the side’s success.Assisting turnoversFelling 13 runners, O’Connor was the top tackler in the game alongside Stade centre Bosman. An afore-mentioned habit of rebounding off the floor certainly aided that tally.As Sergio Parisse surges off this early scrum, the openside scurries across to scythe down the Italy legend:Crucially, he is on his feet in the guard position before Stade scrum-half Julien Dupuy can move the ball away:This means O’Connor is free to contribute from the next phase:The step-by-step diagrams below show how Stade establish a mini maul and lock Paul Gabrillagues breaks away. As Mike Williams tackles him high, looking to wrap up the ball, O’Connor goes low.The ex-Blue then stands up before the ruck has formed, adopting the space in behind the tackle and obstructing Sio, who is looking to resource the ruck.This gives Mike Williams a window to clasp onto ball unchallenged. Though Dupuy taps O’Connor in frustration and urges referee John Lacey to award a penalty to his team, the Irish official instead pings Gabrillagues for holding onto the ball on the floor:Mike Williams forced a similar infringement as Stade pressed five minutes later, swooping to capitalise on a good counter-ruck from Owen Williams:The former Worcester Warrior would probably have been strong enough to secure the turnover on his own, but a shunt from O’Connor certainly adds ballast:Before the first quarter had elapsed, Leicester’s latest number seven offered another glimpse of what he will bring.Defensive decision-making and spoilingTries for Julien Tomas and Paul Williams featured fine offloading and underlined Stade’s ability to score from long range. Indeed, they truly stretched Tigers at times.Without O’Connor’s efforts on this occasion, the Parisians might have plundered another five-pointer:The first thing to note is the decision to jam onto ball-carrier Gabrillagues. Given there were seven more Stade players to the left and only Peter Betham opposite them, O’Connor nullifies a glaring overlap with a ball-and-all tackle:Once more, he rolls towards the opposition posts and rises, Once more, Sio is the obstructed Stade player in support:As Sio drives through, O’Connor sticks out a leg and forces the ball loose:In plain view of referee Lacey, this is a cynical infringement that buys Leicester time to reorganise their defence. Its subtlety ensured that O’Connor escaped unpunished. Such intelligence also punctuated Tigers’ attack.Thinking aheadLast week, Cockerill highlighted O’Connor’s ability to ‘link’; to ensure continuity on the back of shrewd support play. Anticipation is a fundamental quality in all of this, and one first-half lineout emphasised as much:As Ben Youngs finds Smith to set up a midfield move, watch O’Connor:While Smith passes to Owen Williams behind Betham, he heads infield in front of the ball, moving to where he expects the play to end up:The calculated gamble is vindicated when Owen Williams makes a half-break… An intelligent, athletic performance from Leicester Tigers’ England-qualified openside Brendon O’Connor caught the eye on Friday evening.last_img read more

U20 World Cup scouting report: Round One

first_imgJohn Davidson reports from the AJ Bell Stadium on nifty nines, passionate Argies, Georgian slaughter and sensational Scots from the opening day of the World Rugby U20 Championship in Manchester. Hold him back: Jack Maddocks makes a break down the wingImpressive Scottish prop Zander Fagerson crossed soon after and it was game on. The contest ebbed and flowed, Australia edging ahead again by two points with a penalty goal, before Scotland snatched the lead back thanks to an outstanding solo try from winger Darcy Graham. The flyer beat a handful of chasers in his sensational match-wining score from 30 metres out. The Aussies kept coming in the final quarter, and a had contentious try ruled out by the TMO and a blade of grass, but Scotland dug in to record a famous victory. There was no Craig Joubert around this time to spoil the party.Young winger Graham was a standout for the men in tartan, while forward Fagerson led from the front. Australia’s giant full-back Jack Maddocks and wing partner Simon Kennewell were dangerous, willing to throw the ball around and run at defenders, but unable to capitalise on their eye-catching running rugby. This result could have dire consequences for Australia’s tournament, with Italy and hosts England next up. For Scotland, anything is possible at this point.Remember the name: Shaun Stevenson celebrates with Caleb Makene (14)New Zealand 55-0 GeorgiaGeorgia have been promoted into the U20s World Cup for the first time and were given the hardest initiation possible – a date with the Baby Blacks. It took the junior Kiwis all of 84 seconds to score, full-back Shaun Stevenson crossing out wide. Winger Caleb Makene touched down in almost identical fashion seven minutes later and a cricket score loomed. But as the rain tumbled down Georgia managed to stem the bleeding for a while, winning several scrums and lineouts to mount their own attacks.New Zealand notched five tries in the first half and in the second added four more to complete their 55-point rout. But the men in black didn’t have it all their own way, with plucky Georgia strong in the set-piece and refusing to back down. New Zealand’s back three terrorized the Europeans with both Makene and the perfectly named Jonah Lowe finishing with two tries each, along with potent openside Mitchell Jacobson. Remember the name of Shaun Stevenson – this rangy full-back is destined for bigger things. Making history: Andrew Davidson of Scotland celebrates a monumental win over Australia Argentina 24-15 FranceIt doesn’t matter where they’re playing, Argentina always have the loudest and most passionate fans. The country’s national anthem brings tears to the eyes and though the crowd was sparse at the sunny AJ Bell for their U20 World Cup opener against France, it felt like a home game for the men from South America. Argentina finished ninth in last year’s tournament, winning just one of their four games. They’re seeking to do better in 2016 and on today’s showing they will.The Argentines staged a late comeback to miraculously down the French, after looking out of it at 15-6 on 52 minutes, when France bagged a penalty try. But some inspired substitutions and a slew of penalties changed the momentum of the game. The Pumitas scored two successive penalty goals and then crossed for two tries in three minutes to steal the match. It was a scrappy first 40 minutes, neither sides totally convincing, but Argentina found a second gear at the death to get the vital result.He’s a handful: Castres scrum-half Antoine DupontOne player that caught the eye early from the Pumitas was fly-half Domingo Miotti. Like a tall version of Jonny Wilkinson, Miotti possesses a monster boot and knocked over a penalty from halfway in just the first few minutes. Back-rower Bautista Delguy also has some skills, displaying a turn of pace to score a handy try that embarrassed the French cover defence.Gallic scrum-half Antoine Dupont scored the only try of the first half with an individual moment of magic. Seeing a hole in the Argentine defence he grubbered in behind, showed great pace to regather his own kick and touch down. With creative instincts and speed to boot, the nifty Castres No 9 will go far.Scotland 15-10 AustraliaScottish eyes are smiling after this dramatic five-point victory over a haphazard Australia. This was an all-action match marked by Aussie centre Campbell Magnay, who was red carded after separate tip tackles in each half, and referee Thomas Charabas who went to the TMO with nearly every chance he had. Scotland fell behind 3-7 after Isack Rodda scored in the first half, but everything changed when Magnay receiving his marching orders.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS New Zealand move on to tougher opponents in Ireland, as they seek their sixth world title from nine attempts. Rest assured this Kiwi outfit looks as strong as in previous years. Georgia has a slight change of pace in Wales, who will be undoubtedly eager to make up for their one-point loss to the Irish. Unfortunately it doesn’t get any easier for the men of Borjgali.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers click here and find out how to download the digital edition here.last_img read more

Against the odds: rugby loves an upset

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS It may not be seen as too significant, but over the weekend two results caught the eye; one a surprising Aviva Premiership result, the other a lower-tier Test that although against the odds, will not have registered on too many radars.The first was a rare loss for reigning European Champions Cup and Premiership holders Saracens against Harlequins. A strong rearguard effort and tries sweeping in from distance resigned Sarries to a 17-10 loss and Maro Itoje’s first defeat in a top-flight match he has started for his club or England ­ an incredible run that lasted 31 games.The other result on Saturday worth noting was Poland’s 22-0 walloping of Ukraine ­ a side who were much higher than them in the world rankings. The opening win of the Rugby European Trophy meant that the Eastern European side climbed three places in the rankings to 34 in the world, while Ukraine fell from 27 to 28.Why bring both of these up in the same breath? Because rugby fans love an upset. There is something about the underdog snarling their way to victory that gets us excited. We look set for another season of ups and downs. We may not see Connacht double up in the Pro12, but maybe La Rochelle can cling on to first place in France’s Top 14? Scarlets may be the only Welsh side in this season’s Champions Cup, but can their incredibly talented back-line come alive or can the other three sides take inspiration from the Dragons’ surprising 23-21 won over Gloucester in the quarter finals of the Challenge Cup last year, with maybe one of them lifting the trophy?You may be lucky enough to tell when the next upset is coming from, but guaranteed there will be one somewhere and you can bet the rest of us will find ourselves involuntarily revelling in the result as well. Against the odds: Japan’s famous victory over South Africa in 2015 Incredible journey: Connacht win the Pro12 title against the oddsWe will talk about Japan’s 2015 Rugby World Cup victory over South Africa for as long as we live. We shook our heads, chuckled and said, “They’ve done it again!” when Japan’s men’s sevens pulled off a shock win over their New Zealand counterparts in the recent Olympic games. In that same tournament an unfancied Team GB got all the way to a silver medal. And how often will we hear of Connacht’s wonderful rush to the Guinness Pro12 title last season? It was ­ a trophy success lovingly compared to Leicester City’s stunning title grab in the English Premier League soccer – and one which would have made you a fair windfall had you used the best rugby union betting tips.Of course these upsets don’t always go in your favour. Wales fans still cringe whenever their side draw a Pacific Islands nation in the World Cup, harking back in pain to 1991’s 16-13 loss to (Western) Samoa, 38-31 loss to the same side four years later or 2007’s 38-34 loss to Fiji.last_img read more

A message from the Episcopal Church Executive Council

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI April 21, 2012 at 10:55 pm It seems as if to many of our people are getting bogged down in finances. So much so they can’t put a budget together that reflects the simplicity and generosity which Christ wants from us. I hope we are not spreading ourselves so thin that we lose the Christian charisms of feeding the poor, providing for widows, orphans, the elderly and infirmed while sharing what we have left- over with our neighbors outside of our relgion. No where in our scriptures did Jesus say we should build churches or buildings, actually I believe that by his example and teachings it was just the opposite. I imagine he is more than annoyed at our obsession for externals, when it is quite clear to me it is the internal, the heart of the believer that matters the most. Yet where I live there is not one Episcopal Church that has a daily Eucharist. Not one. Not even our cathedral. I find myself closer to G-d now than ever before in my life, and that is not the result of a budget line, or project and I assure you not in the polity of our church. Quite simply put I found Jesus in the Eucharist. It is from there I am able to love those who are different than I am, it is from there I am able to confront the greed which grows from day to day with a giving heart. It is from there I am able to forgive the hypocrite, lier and cheat. And it is from there that I find forgiveness for myself and my own short commings. I find it sad and even dangerous to allude to accountabilty as “pointing the finger” or place blame at those who did not do what they should have done in the first place. And then to say a bad budget cannot be fixed because of cannon law to me is obsurd. I don’t get it. And I think we should hold our leadership accountable for not doing what should have been done, not as a way to embarrass or punish, but as a way to educate and improve that which is to be improved upon.I say we pray more and love more and the people that you are so afraid of leaving might just stick around to see the new people that will be drawn to us as a people of prayer and love. So for what it is worth, see you at the altar.John-Albert DickertChrist Church Cathedral-Cincinnati,Ohio This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS John-Albert Dickert says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET A message from the Episcopal Church Executive Council April 23, 2012 at 12:02 pm A Presbyterian triple AMEN to you John-AlbertConversion, Conversion, Conversion – It’s Conversion stupid.We Episcopalians are Eucharistically starved by unconverted professional priests and bishops who operate the church-nine to five-like a secular company – always locked up – instead of offering daily Mass in open churches inviting prayer and adoration. I, like you, have been converted by The Living Christ in His Body and Blood. We are desperately in need of clergy called by the Holy Spirit to Vocational Ministry. There are exceptions that “prove the rule” and I thank the Lord Christ for you. Converted clergy and Eucharistically centered congregations in an evil world might just fill our churches and witness to the world in Jesus’ name. After all, is not that our primary job as Christians-Episcopallians? Associate Rector Columbus, GA Comments (2) [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] The Executive Council of the Episcopal Church issued the following message at the conclusion of its three-day meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah (Diocese of Utah). The full text follows._________________________________________________A Message from Executive CouncilApril 20, 2012Salt Lake City, UtahThe Lord is Risen! Alleluia!The Lord is Risen indeed! Alleluia!In this joyous Easter season, Executive Council came together in Salt Lake City for its final meeting of this Triennium.It has been a time of reflection on what we have done, and what we have left undone. It has been a time to ask whether we have loved our neighbors – Council members and Church Center staff; bishops, clergy and laity of The Episcopal Church; our sisters and brothers of the Anglican Communion; sisters and brothers who chose to leave The Episcopal Church; the poor, the needy and the oppressed – as ourselves.Have we had enough strength and courage for this work, or have we at times shrunk from the need to stand up and say things that are not only hard to say, but hard to hear? Have we cherished collegiality more than accountability? Have we used our structure to empower one part of the church while disempowering another? Have we been able to overcome fear of the unknown as we face the challenges of being church in a post-Christian world?The presiding bishop spoke of this in her opening remarks: “We will be more faithful, and far more effective, in that discernment work if we can let go of suspicion, assumptions about others’ motives, and power politics – all of which are based in fear and scarcity. We do know that perfect love casts out fear, and when we can remember how deeply and completely love dwells within us, the fear does begin to recede.”President of the House of Deputies Bonnie Anderson said, “I want us to change. But I want us to do it responsibly, with a conceptual framework that will keep us from the unintended consequences that come from reactive decision-making. I want us to keep the decision making in the hands of all the baptized and not an elite few. ”Chief Operating Officer Bishop Stacy Sauls said in his opening remarks, “The conversation I long to have with you as the elected leadership of the Episcopal Church is not about the panic of our declining numbers but about how we strengthen what is working best out there and make what is strong stronger so that the strong can serve the less than strong. The conversation I long to have with you is not about how to get more people in the doors to help us pay the bills but about how to make more disciples of Jesus to go about changing the world into God’s dream for it.”The opening plenary session began with a frank discussion of Council’s extreme disappointment with the budget that was sent to PB&F. Council members were very clear that their disappointment was not simply a reluctance to let go of the budget but instead a very clear statement that the budget sent to PB&F is not the budget Council approved. Rather than spend time assigning blame, Council members moved fairly quickly to a discussion of how to rectify the situation within the confines of the canons. On Friday, Council passed a memo outlining their concerns to PB&F.The plenary discussion strengthened our realization that while we attempted to save money by having shorter Council meetings, the amount of work remained the same or expanded. The result has been longer days with tired and stressed Council members and staff, resulting in a greater chance of errors occurring.Having said that, we want to remind the Church that our work in this triennium involved much more than just the budget. Much of it is not as visible as the budget, but is structurally important, just as a lattice is often hard to see but is vital in supporting the vine as it grows toward the Light. This last meeting seemed an appropriate time to highlight the scope of our work.The Committee on Local Mission and Ministry (LMM) was made up completely of new members of Council. This meant their initial task was discovering and developing the scope of their work. They decided that in addition to simply approving the continued funding of Jubilee Centers they would uphold and celebrate the work done by the various centers. At this meeting they celebrated the work of All Saints Cathedral on St. Thomas, whose work with elderly includes home visits, pastoral care, and work with grandchildren in after school care. LMM also spent a lot of time on multi-cultural issues with a particular focus on encouraging the whole church to engage in anti-racism work. This work calls the Church to continue, individually and corporately, to recognize, name and confront racism in all its guises.In this meeting, Council’s anti-racism committee worked with members to focus on systemic racism. In our table discussions members recounted instances where they became aware of how racism permeates the world in which we live, move and have our being – most of us in positions of great privilege that insulate us from much of the destructive results of this sin and thus puts us in danger of being blind to its effect on those less privileged.The report of the Committee on Advocacy and Networking around their work on issues of immigration led the Council into a heated and passionate discussion of how we tease out the differences between anti-racism training and diversity and inclusion training. Immigration includes more than issues of racism. How do we make space for people who come from other countries in our church? How do we broaden our conversation to address these issues without in any way lessening our commitment to the peculiar and dire necessity for anti-racism work in this church and in these United States? It is clear this will be an ongoing conversation in Council.A and N [Committee on Advocacy and Networking], working in collaboration with the Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations, has moved resolutions on Immigration Reform, Racial Profiling, and Corporate Social Responsibility. These resolutions empower local, regional, national and international advocacy on behalf of the disenfranchised and empower OGR to lobby on behalf of our shared values as Episcopalians in a conflicted, partisan environment on Capitol Hill. For example, one simple resolution on the moral dimensions of balanced budgets gave The Episcopal Church the ability to participate in a dominant national debate in a creative, visible, and influential way that would not have been possible absent the resolution.The Joint Standing Committee on World Mission addressed many major areas of concern. It worked with the D020 Task Force that developed a process that allowed for the involvement of the church in responding to the proposed Anglican Covenant through the preparation of a study guide. Collated responses from church leadership at all levels informed the report, which is in the forthcoming Blue Book. The committee engaged in an on-going review of the funding source and distribution of funds for CETALC (Theological Educational Center of Latin America and the Caribbean). It followed the formation of a seminary for Latin America and the Caribbean, heard from missioners, especially the Young Adult Service Corps, and discussed ways of supporting future missionary efforts. After the successful Mutual Regional Ministry Conference in February 2010 that involved all the provinces of the Americas, the committee discussed plans for a future conference. The committee continued to evaluate the covenants the Episcopal Church has with our covenant partners in Mexico, Central America, Brazil, the Philippines and Liberia. Finally, the committee also received regular reports from Episcopal Relief and Development and worked with the “Rebuild Our Church in Haiti” campaign.The Joint Standing Committee on Finance for Mission dealt with many issues beyond the budget. They continued consulting on funding for the Archives and tracked mission funding as well as the larger financial picture of the Church, including modifications of the budget on an annual basis and financial trends five to twenty years out. They also have examined the highest and best use of the Church Center property and reviewed the status of fundraising for Haiti.In the absence of committee chair Del Glover, acting chair Tim Anderson asked COO Sauls to share with the entire Council his report on the proposed effort to create an Episcopal Church Cooperative. This involves providing high-quality professional service to dioceses, congregations and other Episcopal institutions at a lower cost than would be available to these individual institutions by making use of economies of scale and group purchasing power. This would leave additional funds for mission and ministry at the local level, thereby furthering the overall mission of the Church.The Joint Standing Committee on Governance and Administration for Mission (GAM) was formed at the beginning of this triennium and quickly realized there was ample work to accomplish, which included a comprehensive review and revision of the By-laws of the Executive Council of the General Convention and the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society; the creation of Rules of Order for the Executive Council; a revision of the Whistleblower Policy for the staff; a call for the GAM-009 Consultation on Church Structure held in May 2011; and the initiation of board development training for members of Council. At this meeting, the Council adopted a new DFMS Employee Handbook, human resources policies, and Policies for the Protection of Children & Youth from Abuse. The adoption of the Employee Handbook and policies represents an enormous amount of work on the part of the Executive Council and staff members John E. Colón, Paul Nix, and Bishop Stacy Sauls. John Colón, Director of Human Resource Management, was especially commended for his significant contribution and tireless devotion to the completion of this important project.Wednesday night the Class of 2015 said farewell to the Class of 2012 with a lighthearted roast that revealed hitherto unknown talents of some of our members. The Class of 2012 was treated to an “EC Cruise” led by “Captain Gregory Straub,” who was played by a Council member who will remain unnamed to protect him from being besieged by talent scouts.On Thursday Council heard reports from the Rt. Rev. James Cowan, bishop of British Columbia and liaison to Council from the Anglican Church of Canada, and from Lelanda Lee, elected representative from Council to the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.Bishop Cowan reminded us of the need to listen respectfully and deeply to one another and to “the many.”He asked, “Where are the voices of prophecy in your midst? Personally, I as a bishop, need to remember that prophets are annoying as I seek to maintain an institution, but are necessary to reforming the institution.”He also said he wants to take home with him the Council’s process of anti-racism training.Lelanda Lee reported on attending a meeting last week, where for the first time, three other ELCA Full Communion Partners also were present from the Reformed Church in America, the Presbyterian Church USA, and the Southern Province of the Moravian Church. Lee noted that unlike the other ecumenical partners, she is the only layperson among them, a reflection of the Episcopal Church’s commitment to the ministry of the laity. Her point in sharing specific information from the ELCA meeting and these other churches was to highlight the fact that our churches share many concerns and trends in common.Council also heard a comprehensive report from Elizabeth Lowell about work being done around creating a Development Office for The Episcopal Church. Major challenges include the time to do appropriate cultivation of possible donors; finding people who can ask for those major gifts, and obtaining most effective development software.As that plenary session ended, in a moment of personal privilege one Council member mused — given current data on the number of people with no church affiliation — on what would happen if we all committed to spending as much time and money developing evangelism and stewardship skills as we do fundraising skills.As always, we ended around the Lord’s Table, gathering not just for solace but also for strength, not just for pardon but also for renewal.Council passed resolutions on the following topics:Declares Council’s support for Senate Bill 1670, End Racial Profiling Act of 2011, which is designed to enforce the constitutional right to equal protection of the laws by eliminating racial profiling through changing the policies and procedures underlying the practice, and stands in solidarity with the suffering of the victims of the harm caused by racial profiling, their families and their communities.Urges the Congress to adopt Senate Bill 1925 to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act that includes new protective measures for Native American women.States Council’s support of the work being done by Children’s Defense Fund’s “Cradle to Prison Pipeline” campaign and similar campaigns directed at breaking the cycle of disproportionate incarceration of children and youth of color targeted by Zero Tolerance rules.Reaffirms the importance of ongoing Anti-Racism Training for the church, and commits Council to participate in Anti-Racism Training at its regularly scheduled meetings on a periodic basis.Reaffirms the commitment of the church to the Rebuild Our Church in Haiti campaign, thanking the Episcopal Church Foundation for its early leadership in administering the campaign, which will now be part of the development effort of the DFMS staff.Recognizes a new companion diocese relationship between the Dioceses of Southeast Florida and Haiti.Reaffirms the Executive Council Committee on Indigenous Ministries, restating its mandate and committee composition.Reauthorizes the continuing Executive Council’s Committee on Corporate Social Responsibility and the Economic Justice Loan Committee. Adopted some cleanup amendments to Council’s bylaws.Adopted a new Employee Handbook resulting from more than two years of intensive work on the part of the present Joint Standing Committee on Governance and Administration and the former Administration and Finance Committee. Addresses the need to plan for partnership conversations with Province IX, IARCA, and Mexico, so that such conversations might serve as model for other partnerships. Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Executive Council, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Posted Apr 20, 2012 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments are closed. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Joh W Ward says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Executive Council April 2012 last_img read more

Getting back on the path to decency

first_img Harry Coverston says: By Tom EhrichPosted Sep 26, 2012 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls Comments (8) Getting back on the path to decency An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA September 27, 2012 at 10:04 am Not sure the characterizations of Governor Romney’s (habitally ~20%) and President Obama’s (typically in the low single digits) charitable giving are as accurate as needed in order to make fair judgments. On their respective 2011 tax returns, the Romneys reported giving 29.4% to charity and the Obamas 21.8%. For a report on each one’s charitable giving over a longer term, see, for example, Glenn Kessler’s article in the February 15, 2012 Washington Post, “Obama’s Gifts to Charity: Just 1 percent?”. Before approving or chastising either one, it’s important to get as close to the facts as we can. Ron Duckworth says: September 27, 2012 at 5:55 pm Wow, personal income has grown 900% over the last 20 years? That’s a 45% annual growth rate. Nowhere else have I seen it stated as more than 3.7% annually. But I really agree with your third point; that it is important to tell the truth. Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tom Rightmyer says: September 28, 2012 at 8:32 pm In the 17th and 18th century in Virginia, Maryland, and North Carolina the colonial legislatures authorized church vestries to levy a per person tax on all white adult males and all slaves of working age (13+). The tax was about 30 pounds of tobacco when a field hand could make between 1000 and 1500 pounds of tobacco. The church tax amounted to between two and three per cent of income. Clergy in Virginia were paid 16.000 pounds of tobacco; the amount varied in pther colonies. Vestries also used this tax money to build churches and parsonages and to provide for the poor of the parish. My conclusion is that the present level of giving is not very different from the 18th century level. Tom Rightmyer, Asheville, NC [email protected] [Religion News Service] Nothing will get better in our troubled and divided nation until we take to heart three lessons about what it means to be a decent person.First, give back to God.In researching trends in giving, I was shocked to discover that more than 50 percent of those who attend Episcopal congregations give nothing at all — not a dime — to their churches. Giving has plummeted 50 percent over the past 20 years, even as personal income has soared 900 percent.Across mainline Protestant traditions, giving has sagged to 2 percent of household income — one-fifth of the biblical tithe. Even conservative traditions that teach the tithe give at only the 3 percent level, and Roman Catholics give 1.5 percent of income.As wealth has soared, especially for the few, gratitude has been replaced by arrogance. We earned it, say the lucky, and we deserve to keep it. Trouble is, that wealth would vanish were it not for bailouts, government protections, tax breaks, and a complex infrastructure of education, technology, transportation and laws that they feel entitled to exploit but not obligated to support.It’s time we learned that what we have came from God. The fortunate have a fundamental obligation to give back to God. As long as we cling to wealth as if Mammon were God, we will remain shallow and self-serving — and thus self-defeating.Second, help the unfortunate.The myth of rugged individualism is nonsense. Any society worth perpetuating learns charity, not hoarding. It is our God-given nature to help the child in danger, the elderly person who falls, the victim of assault. The spectacle of a rich politician telling his rich friends that the unfortunate are lazy moochers violates every teaching of faith and history. It is an assault on humanity itself.A decent society’s moral foundation rests on sharing, not on building bigger barns. This is what Christianity teaches — what Jesus called caring for the “least of these.” It is what Judaism teaches — giving from the harvest to benefit widows and orphans. If I understand correctly, caring for the weak is a core teaching of Islam.It couldn’t be more basic. Haves must care for have-nots. The fortunate must care for the unfortunate. The healthy care for the sick, the strong care for the weak. This isn’t some radical concept designed to separate rugged individualists from their hard-earned wealth. It is a basic tenet of civilization.Third, tell the truth.No matter how fashionable and politically expedient it may be, dishonesty undermines society. We cannot possibly enact and enforce enough laws to protect people from cheats, thieves, liars and predators.For society to endure, citizens must embrace a basic level of honesty. Otherwise, children cannot play safely outside their doors, neighbors cannot borrow tools, shoppers cannot trust products, patients cannot trust physicians and pharmaceuticals, contracts mean nothing, promises mean nothing, marital vows mean nothing, friendships mean nothing.Big lies lead to demagoguery and oppression. Medium-sized lies lead to shattered trust and confidence. Small lies eviscerate families.When politicians lie with reckless abandon, when business leaders treat dishonesty as slick strategy, they guarantee not only their own downfall but the collapse of the society that they claim to lead.As a lawyer named Joseph Welch told a demagogue named Joe McCarthy at a low point in American history, if we have no “decency,” all we have left is “cruelty” and “recklessness.”— Tom Ehrich is a writer, church consultant and Episcopal priest based in New York. He is the author of “Just Wondering, Jesus” and founder of the Church Wellness Project. His website is www.morningwalkmedia.com. Follow Tom on Twitter @tomehrich. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Doug Desper says: September 26, 2012 at 5:32 pm I really appreciated most of this article until the villainization of the wealthy was interjected. Would everybody who feels guilty for taking advantage of a legal tax break please just donate it to the government? Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET September 29, 2012 at 12:10 pm Most of us rarely like to hear the truth, particularly when it implicates our own privilege and the politics and religion with which we legitimate it. Mr. Erlich has hit the nail on the head above. Not surprisingly, for many of us, it smarts. A number of the early church fathers, like Islam today, did not see charity as an act of magnanimous condescension as it so often practiced today, but rather as an obligation. One of the fathers, whose name I can no longer remember, went so far as to say charity was not so much an act of magnanimity as simply returning to the poor what was already theirs.Jesus himself points us in this direction. When the disciples remind Jesus that the assembled people are hungry and suggests he send them home so they can find food, he responds, “You feed them.” So, the hungry are fed, a mark of the Kingdom of G-d. If G-d sees the hungry as blessed and Jesus sees his followers as obligated to feed them, what does it say about a world of hungry people in which Jesus’ well fed followers simply look on ? Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 September 26, 2012 at 2:27 pm I am in agreement with the article through the first four paragraphs. However, the notion that the wealthy are so because of bailouts, etc. is nonsense. All the infrastructure was built with tax money collected disproportionately (under our progressive tax code) from the wealthy.Research has discovered that 80% of millionaires did not inherit any money. They made it themselves! Most of those millionaires started small businesses and made them grow by their hard work.Everyone, not just the “fortunate” should follow the teachings of Jesus and love their neighbor. It does not take much searching to find who gives the most to local charities. As would be expected, most of the donations come from the fortunate.The rich politician you chastise for his comments about the 47% who do not pay income tax is known to habitually give ~20% of his annual income to charity. His opponent typically gives in the low single digits. Per the theme of the article, which one is doing what you desire and which one should you chastise?Government programs involve the involuntary taking of money from one person and giving it to another. There is no morality in that. It is only in voluntary giving on an individual basis that giving to God and helping the unfortunate occurs morally. Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Douglas Elliott says: Comments are closed. September 28, 2012 at 4:45 pm Your premise is correct and I agree with your article. The dreaded however is that it’s not about money; it’s about the people in the church, the religious and the lay. I’m the dinosaur in the room. At the age of 68, I’ve belonged to 4 parishes and worked part-time for a diocese and I’m tired of the enabling.I help feed starving children, supply mosquito netting, help build water systems. Locally, I work with community organizations and give my money to them to help support where we live. I moved my membership back to a church that requires me to drive 80 miles one way on Sunday mornings. There is life in that church and old friends I’ve known for years but I’ve slipped through the cracks there too. They don’t know why I get up there early or drive that far just to go to church. I don’t pledge there anymore because I feed the hungry and support the less fortunate around me and help develope educational events for the children in this area. These are not great things and they aren’t hard to do and they bring comfort and fun to me and them.Pledging to my church just makes me feel guilty because it never seems enough and, except for a food pantry, I’m not sure what they do with any money they receive to help people. No one in my church remembers I’m alive unless I show up on Sundays or they need help with selling chili supper tickets. My point isn’t that hard to get. The first bishop I remember as a child used to say, “We are called to be fishers of men, not keepers of the acquarium.” The other slogan that keeps going through my head is, “To whom much is given, much is required,” and I don’t think that means which tax bracket you fall into. September 28, 2012 at 5:01 pm In the middle 80’s, I published for the Executive Council’s and Presiding Bishop’s Office of Stewardship and Development the fact that the Episcopal Church had grown to and attained the highest giving of the major denominations because of great authentic financial/giving by lay and clergy leadership . (We were the top givers with per unit giving and Venture in Mission thirty years ago.) So the latest data is not a decline but a fall off the cliff. Our leadership at every level has abdicated its witness to and implementation of financial/giving/ spiritual leadership. What we hear now is “gimme” and spiritualized/dualistic nonsense about giving; I see no desire for authentic and powerful witness to the true blessings of giving as Tom is in part indicating. It seems that we have returned to the bottom levels of giving we had climbed up from in the 60’s to late 80’s. Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET (The Rev.) Ronald L. Reed says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Paula Moore says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Statements and opinions expressed in the articles and communications herein, are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Episcopal News Service or the Episcopal Church. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Kurt Kirchoff says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

El Consejo debate estatus del Pacto Anglicano en pequeños grupos

first_img Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls El Consejo debate estatus del Pacto Anglicano en pequeños grupos ‘Aún estamos en comunión’, dice uno de los miembros Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Victoria Matthews, de la Diócesis de Christchurch, Nueva Zelanda, y el arzobispo de Cantórbery Rowan Williams, conversan el 31 de octubre (hora local) poco después de que Matthews iniciara el primer debate formal sobre el Pacto Anglicano durante la reunión de 12 días del CCA en Auckland. Foto para ENS de Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service — Auckland, Nueva Zelanda] El Consejo Consultivo Anglicano consumió una hora el 31 de octubre (hora local) en una conversación privada para debatir el estatus del Pacto Anglicano, pero no tomó ninguna decisión.Esas conversaciones en grupos de reflexión, precedidas por una breve sesión plenaria abierta al público, ha sido el patrón de esta 15ª. reunión del CCA.Antes de que empezaran las conversaciones de reflexión el 31 de octubre, Victoria Matthews, obispa de la Diócesis de Christchurch en Nueva Zelanda, le pidió a los miembros que consideraran “¿por qué [el Pacto] es causa de temor [para algunos] y por qué una señal de esperanza para  otros?”.Los resultados de los diálogos de reflexión se les entregaron a la Comisión Permanente Interanglicana sobre Unidad, Fe y Orden (IASCUFO) y al Comité Permanente de la Comunión Anglicana “mientras se disciernen los medios de llevar el asunto adelante”, según un folleto sobre el proceso.Está programado que los miembros se reúnan otra vez para debatir sobre el pacto el 6 de noviembre, el penúltimo día de la reunión [que se extiende] desde el 27 de octubre hasta el 7 de noviembre. No resulta clara si cualesquiera resoluciones acerca del pacto se propondrán durante esa sesión.Josephine Hicks, miembro del CCA en representación de la Iglesia Episcopal, le dijo a Episcopal News Service que su grupo de reflexión sostuvo “una conversación muy buena” en la cual participaron miembros de [las iglesias de] Tanzania, Kenia, Burundi, Australia, Escocia, las Antillas, México, Cuba y Pakistán, además de ella misma.Los integrantes de los grupos intercambiaron opiniones acerca del estado de la discusión del pacto en su provincia, cómo ha sido el proceso y qué le ha enseñado la experiencia a la provincia respecto a ser anglicanos y ser parte de la Comunión Anglicana.Hicks dijo que la conversación acerca de los procesos utilizados en cada provincia “nos hizo recordar que nos gobernamos a través de diferentes procesos en la Comunión y nos esforzamos por entender los procesos de los demás”.“Alguien comentó que enterarse de que una provincia ha rechazado o aceptado el pacto afecta el proceso de dilucidar de otra provincia”, dijo ella, añadiendo que otra persona resaltó que “escuchar en las primeras etapas lo que pensaba [del pacto] cierto número de iglesias africanas en particular no había afectado lo suficiente el criterio de las provincias”.Cuando el grupo consideró lo que los miembros habían llegado a saber a través del proceso del pacto, dijo Hicks, “el verdadero tema de esos comentarios fue que hemos madurado como Comunión y que obviamente tenemos diferencias pero que lo que nos mantiene unidos es mucho más fuerte que lo que nos divide”.“Observamos que aún estamos en la Comunión, aunque algunas provincias hayan rechazado el pacto y algunas lo hayan aceptado y algunas estén aún considerándolo”, abundó Hicks. “Eso nos demuestra que aún podemos estar en Comunión sin un pacto”.Algunos miembros del grupo dijeron que “el proceso del pacto nos ha ayudado a concentrarnos en algo más que en los asuntos que nos dividen”, según comentó Hicks.Hicks comenzó su período de tres reuniones en la reunión de 2005 en Nottingham, Inglaterra, cuando miembros del CCA tanto de la Iglesia Episcopal en Estados Unidos como de la Iglesia Anglicana del Canadá asistieron como observadores luego que ambas provincias retiraron voluntariamente su participación aviniéndose a una petición de los primados anglicanos —o arzobispos principales— para darle espacio a la consideración de los problemas de la sexualidad.Ella dijo que algunos de los miembros de su grupo de reflexión aquí comentaron que “hay un espíritu mucho menos contencioso en esta reunión [si se le compara con la reunión intermedia de Jamaica en 2009] y la gente cree que parte de eso es el proceso del pacto que nos ha ayudado a concentrarnos en las relaciones como algo que es más importante que un pedazo de papel”.“Ese espíritu parece palpable en esta reunión”, concluyó ella.Matthews dijo durante su presentación que  “no es la labor de la  IASCUFO promover el pacto, sino más bien supervisar la recepción del pacto”.La obispa dijo que en el curso de esa supervisión, ella, como miembro de la IASCUFO, había aprendido que “hay en verdad dos documentos circulando. Uno es el documento que la gente tiene en mente y el otro es el Pacto Anglicano en el papel”.“A veces el documento en discusión es irreconocible como el Pacto Anglicano”, apuntó.Durante una conversación de mesa el día anterior, miembros del CCA discutieron la manera en que sus provincias tomaban las decisiones difíciles.“De la misma manera que su provincia le hace frente a una decisión difícil, así lo hace la Comunión Anglicana de iglesias”, dijo Matthews en el Consejo. “La interrogante detrás del pacto es cuál es el mejor camino. ¿Hay un camino seguro de mantenernos unidos? ¿Cuál es nuestro temor más profundo cuando consideramos los procesos de la toma de decisiones?”Haciendo notar que el Consejo había dedicado la noche anterior a considerar cómo las familias pueden cambiar sus interacciones de respuestas violentas a pacíficas, Matthews sugirió “que en la idea original del pacto había un deseo de permitir que la Comunión Anglicana de iglesias fuese un lugar seguro para el diálogo y el intercambio de ideas.“El documento actual del Pacto Anglicano no logra eso para todas las iglesias de la Comunión Anglicana y es por eso que algunas iglesias han rechazado el documento”, dijo ella. “No obstante, según escuchamos anoche, en el tuétano del pacto de Dios está ‘yo seré tu Dios y tú serás mi pueblo’. Y debemos tener eso presente”.Debido a que están “los que dicen que [el pacto] es punitivo y los que dicen que no tiene dientes”, Matthews afirmó que ella cree que el pacto “ni siquiera se percibe, no digamos se recibe, como un camino verdaderamente seguro en el cual encontrarnos los unos con los otros”.Ella invitó a los miembros [del Consejo] a considerar el porqué para algunos el pacto es “algo de temer y para otros un señal de esperanza”.Y Matthews le pidió al Consejo “reflexionar sobre lo que hay en el pacto que nos brinde un camino posible para que caminemos juntos” y si el pacto pudiera ser “potencialmente útil en su provincia cuando usted tenga que enfrentarse con una situación difícil”.El Pacto Anglicano se propuso por primera vez en el Informe Windsor de 2004 como un modo de que la Comunión y sus provincias pudiera mantener la unidad a pesar de las diferencias, especialmente relacionadas con los problemas de la interpretación bíblica y la sexualidad humana. La última reunión del CCA, en mayo de 2009 en Jamaica, decidió aplazar el someter a la consideración de las provincias el tercer y último anteproyecto del pacto porque los miembros del CCA pensaban que el proceso del pacto para resolver disputas necesitaba trabajarse más.Luego de que un pequeño grupo de trabajo solicitara reacciones de las provincias acerca de ese proceso, la versión final del pacto se sometió a la consideración formal de las provincias en diciembre de  2009. Un relato actualizado del estatus de esa consideración puede encontrarse aquí.Antecedentes del CCAEl CCA es uno de los cuatro instrumentos de la Comunión, siendo los otros  el arzobispo de Cantórbery (que sirve como presidente del CCA), la Conferencia de Lambeth de Obispos Anglicanos y la Reunión de los Primados.Instituido en 1969, el CCA incluye a clérigos y laicos, al igual que a obispos, entre sus delegados. La membresía [del CCA] consta de una a tres personas de cada una de las 38 provincias de la Comunión Anglicana, dependiendo del tamaño de la feligresía de cada provincia. En los casos donde hay tres miembros, hay un obispo, un presbítero y un laico. En los casos donde se nombran menos miembros, la preferencia se le da a los laicos. La Constitución del CCA puede encontrarse aquí.El Consejo se reúne cada tres o cuatro años y la reunión de Auckland es la 15ª desde su creación.La Iglesia Episcopal está representada por Josephine Hicks, de Carolina del Norte; la Rda. Gay Jennings, de Ohio y el obispo Ian Douglas de Connecticut.Jefferts Schori asiste a la reunión en su carácter de miembro del Comité Permanente de la Comunión Anglicana, que se reunió aquí antes del comienzo de la reunión del CCA.  Douglas también es miembro del Comité Permanente.Una lista completa de los participantes en la 15ª reunión del CCA se encuentra aquí.Toda la cobertura que ha hecho ENS del CCA15 se encuentra aquí.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ center_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 5, 2012 Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

Douglas John Fisher ordained as bishop of Western Massachusetts

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA By Deborah Johansen HarrisPosted Dec 3, 2012 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Rt. Rev. Douglas John Fisher[Episcopal Diocese of Western Massachusetts] The Rev. Douglas John Fisher was ordained the ninth bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Western Massachusetts on Dec. 1 during a ceremony held at the MassMutual Center in Springfield, Massachusetts.At the time of his election on June 2, Fisher, 57, was serving as rector of Grace Church in Millbrook, New York.Fisher succeeds the Rt. Rev. Gordon P. Scruton, who has served for the past 16 years as the diocese’s eighth bishop.“This day is not about one person, but about the whole church,” said Fisher. “The ordination and consecration of a bishop is a deeply meaningful time when we all get to renew the faith that is within us and recommit ourselves to following Jesus in his mission of mercy, compassion and hope. It is a time of celebration and inspiration for all God’s people.”Preacher was George Forsythe, president of Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri, and a former academic dean at West Point when Fisher was Episcopal chaplain there.“Today is a time of hope in the bright future for God’s work under Doug’s guiding hand,” said Forsythe in his sermon. “And how fitting it is that on the eve of the Advent season, we look to future things to come; to God’s presence in the world in the incarnation of Jesus the Christ and to the celebration of the truth of God’s infinite love and reconciling grace.”Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori serves as the chief consecrator. More than a dozen Episcopal bishops attended the ceremony, as well as Bishop James E. Hazelwood of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America’s New England Synod and local civic leaders. Diocesan clergy also processed along with parishioners carrying emblematic banners from their churches.Family members in attendance included Fisher’s wife, the Rev. Elizabeth Fisher, rector of St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church in Amenia, New York, his daughters Caragh and Grace, and son Geoff.Special guests included the Rev. Daniel Sarfo, bishop of the Anglican Diocese of Kumasi in Ghana, the sister diocese to the Episcopal Diocese of Western Massachusetts. Sarfo was accompanied by his wife, Mary, and members of his diocese.The bishop’s vestments were designed by Jeff Wunrow of Jeff Wunrow Designs in St. Louis, Missouri. Brenna Hatcher, a friend of the Fisher family, helped with the design. The fabric consists of an abstract configuration of fish, symbolizing the biblical story of the loaves and the fishes that fed 5,000 people — a symbol of God’s abundant gifts to humankind. The design also plays on the bishop’s surname, Fisher. The ordination took place on the first day of Advent in the church calendar and follows the Feast of St. Andrew, the patron saint of fishermen, on Nov. 30.Hand-turned, glazed chalices and patens for use in the Eucharist — one for each parish in the diocese — were created by Jaye Pope of Good Dirt Pottery in Montague, Massachusetts. They are also decorated with the vestment fish pattern and were blessed during the ceremony.Fisher was officially “seated” as bishop at 10 a.m. on Sunday, Dec. 2 in Christ Church Cathedral in Springfield.Fisher has been rector of Grace Church in Millbrook since September 2000. Prior to that call, he served Holy Innocents Episcopal Church in Highland Falls, New York, and was a chaplain to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point from 1997 to 2000.He holds a Master of Divinity degree from Immaculate Conception Seminary and a Doctor of Ministry degree from Episcopal Divinity School.Fisher was ordained a Roman Catholic priest for the Diocese of Rockville Centre in 1980. He left the Roman priesthood and was married in 1984. He was received into the Episcopal Church in June 1997.The Episcopal Diocese of Western Massachusetts has about 16,650 members in 63 congregations.— Deborah Johansen Harris is communications director and missioner for the Episcopal Diocese of Western Massachusetts. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Consecrations, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments are closed. Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Stephen Voysey says: Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC December 4, 2012 at 7:48 am Congratulations and all best, Doug – sorry I couldn’t be there in person. Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Douglas John Fisher ordained as bishop of Western Massachusetts Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET December 3, 2012 at 6:12 pm It most certanly was a joyous occasion. And we even had alittle Bruce Springsteen music. Part of the service was done in English, part of it in Spanish, and all of it in American Sign Language. It was a beautiful and inclusive service. Welcome Bishop Fisher to Western Massachusetts!! Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group center_img Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments (3) Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Katherine Maleno says: December 3, 2012 at 5:33 pm A joyous occasion! I pray that God will abundantly bless the Diocese of Western Massachusetts and their new bishop! An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Rev. Kathryn Macek says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL People Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC House of Bishops, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

National poll finds discrimination prevalent in the United States

first_imgNational poll finds discrimination prevalent in the United States Perspectives vary widely by race, hope for the future remains November 12, 2013 at 6:13 pm @Rich Basta,Wishing that discrimination has lessened–or imagining that we have made more actual progress in overcoming it than we have–will never make it disappear. And the survey does not even mention discrimination against women, gays, lesbians, or transgender persons, who still face open hate and assault simply because of their gender or orientation. Even military veterans face discrimination in hiring. And fear of those who differ from us, especially among Caucasians, is a leading cause of de facto discrimination.The United States has a very, very long way to go before we become–even remotely–the open, egalitarian, and equitable society that we like to imagine we are. To pretend that we have not fallen far short of God’s grace and Her call to justice is a deliberate delusion of the worst kind. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Angela Shepherd says: November 12, 2013 at 6:29 pm Mr. Huff and Mr. Spangler:I think you misrepresented my words.. I will give you both the benefit of the doubt as to your motives, as I don’t know you personally. I never said that there isn’t discrimination in America. We all fall short of God’s grace. I was just merely offering up an opinion that the survey does more harm than good. We have made great progress in this country on many fronts in regards to all kinds of discrimination. That’s an admission based on facts, not a delusion.Peace. November 22, 2013 at 5:54 am Well stated. The distinction between discrimination and racism is important. Anyone who follows the Southern Poverty Center’s tracking of hate groups is aware of the increase in these groups and the work that needs to be done in confronting this ‘sin’ and evil’. I hope this conference and poll will result in new energy in anti racism trainings in TEC. John R Huff Jr says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA November 13, 2013 at 10:16 am The Harris Poll, released November 12, was the first ever commissioned by The Episcopal Church and focused on the topic of discrimination. The results of the poll are not the view of The Episcopal Church. This particular poll addresses specifically the topic of race, and is representative of Americans’ views, according to Harris, a respected polling and research firm.Clearly, the Harris Poll points out that while feelings of discrimination are not limited to any one race, it is particularly pronounced among African-Americans and white Americans. Conversation about race and discrimination is never easy. That is a foundational reason for The Episcopal Church to sponsoring Fifty Years Later: The State of Racism in America on November 15 and 16. Fifty Years Later: The State of Racism in America is designed to explore this topic further as a Church and as a society, to help find new ways to continue the progress, and to provoke discussion that will, hopefully, lead to broader awareness and personal action. T J White says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab November 12, 2013 at 5:56 pm What are the statistics for each region of the US? November 12, 2013 at 7:21 pm Our own church continues to perpetuate discrimination based on both class and race. As long as we continue to have separate services for congregants who are poor, such as the mid-week rector’s pantry; for the non-English speaking; and for the white bill payers, we continue our long Episcopalian tradition of discrimination. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Posted Nov 12, 2013 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ November 13, 2013 at 3:30 pm And Asians were left off because ? Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bob Walden says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Jay Stout says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN November 12, 2013 at 5:42 pm I don’t understand why the Presiding Bishop, and by extension, the national church, is obssessed with perpetuating this race-based victimology and class warfare. The “Have white Americans have gotten more than they deserve” question just perpetuates the “class- warfare” model, pitting one group of Americans against the other. We have made great strides in this country- why can’t we just leave it at that, or emphasize? Martin Luther King taught us to relate to each other through the “content of our character”, and not to focus on the color of one’s skin. The way the article is written, you would think we haven’t made as much progress as we actually have.People can conduct any survey they want. I just feel this type of survey doesn’t move the ball forward. It perpeuates the balkanization of America instead of promoting unity. Others may disagree, but that’s how I feel about it. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Sandra Koenig says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments (14) Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Br Ronald A Fox says: Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York November 12, 2013 at 8:42 pm I am appalled by the discrimination in the article. I live in Hawaii where we have quite a mix of races and ethnic backgrounds. Where are the Asians and Pacific Island peoples? Were they not included because this was an East Coast survey? Of course racial discrimination still exists, and probably always will. Most of it is in the eyes of the one discriminated against and what they have been taught by their family and peers. Discrimination is always felt when one feels that they have not been treated fairly. But, life is not fair. Get over it! Love and forgive one another and get on with life. Jesus said that we are to love one another and that implies forgiveness along with it. He came to tell us that God forgives us for not loving one another, but that we are to continue to try anyway. Love will not stop discrimination but forgiveness will help us to get past it and on to happier lives. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA November 13, 2013 at 12:22 pm In the November 12 e-mail newsletter, the lead article was entitled “National poll finds discrimination prevalent in the United States.” I was disappointed to find that this headline was totally inaccurate when compared with the article. The article went on to say:A new national poll commissioned by the Episcopal Church has found that nearly all Americans (98 percent) feel that there is at least some discrimination in the United States today.My criticism is based on two points:1. The article title suggests that discrimination is a fact. That 98 percent of the people polled feel that way is only evidence of prevailing opinion and not of fact.2. In a similar manner, the poll did not find that discrimination was “prevalent.” According to Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, the term prevalent means dominant or widespread. According to the article, “nearly all Americans feel that there is at least some discrimination.” Clearly, “at least some discrimination” does not mean the same thing as “discrimination is prevalent.”Discrimination may or may not be prevalent. Although I suspect discrimination is indeed widespread, we do not have factual evidence either way based on the poll described in the article. To say the least, the headline for this article is misleading.center_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Rich Basta says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ November 12, 2013 at 7:38 pm I would only add that many still point to the fact that such discrimination is most evident at 11AM each Suday in most churches. Are we in the church concerned to doing anything about that? Is this not the pot calling the kettle black? Should we not cast out the beam in our own eyes before we attemp to remove the splinter in others? Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Neva Rae Fox says: Featured Jobs & Calls [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] A new national poll commissioned by the Episcopal Church has found that nearly all Americans (98 percent) feel that there is at least some discrimination in the United States today.In addition, African-American respondents (49 percent) are three times as likely as white respondents (16 percent) and Hispanic respondents (11 percent) to feel there is a “great deal” of discrimination.Harris Interactive conducted the poll online in October among more than 2,000 U.S. adults.“Despite major reforms, our culture continues to perpetuate discrimination in various forms,” said Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori. “Our churches and communities are critical motivators in encouraging change in these issues toward greater parity and acceptance.”In spite of those findings, more than eight in 10 Americans agree that in the future, Americans will be more accepting of all races. Hispanic respondents (87 percent) are more likely to agree than African-American respondents (68 percent) and are somewhat more optimistic than white (84 percent ) that Americans will be more accepting.Forum to explore findingsThese findings and others will be explored by a distinguished panel of national experts including Myrlie Evers-Williams, widow of slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers, and former Mississippi Governor William Winter during a public forum on Nov. 15 in Jackson, Mississippi, Fifty Years Later: The State of Racism in America.The forum will be webcast live from St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral and keynoted by the presiding bishop. Details are available here.Highest level of discriminationNearly seven in 10 Americans (69 percent) feel African-Americans are discriminated against, the highest of any race. In addition, six in 10 (63 percent) feel Hispanic Americans are discriminated against, while five in 10 (51 percent) feel Native Americans and nearly four in 10 (39 percent) feel whites are discriminated against.Generally, individual races feel they are discriminated against more than other races. This is particularly pronounced among African-Americans and white respondents:African-American respondents (96 percent) are more likely to believe they are discriminated against than white (65 percent) and Hispanic (76 percent) respondents.White respondents (45 percent) believe they are more likely to believe they are discriminated against than African-American (11 percent) and Hispanic (21 percent) respondents.Hispanic respondents (75 percent) believe they are more likely to believe they are discriminated against than white (63 percent) respondents.Minority respondents in general feel that white Americans have gotten more, economically, than they deserve. African-American (58 percent) and Hispanic (49 percent) respondents are more likely than white respondents (28 percent) to agree that white Americans have garnered more economically than they deserve. This disparity was not nearly as prevalent when respondents were asked about other races receiving more economically than they deserve.According to the results, one indication of differences in perceptions among races may be that many do not have close friends of other races. Hispanic (62 percent) and African-American (52 percent) respondents are more likely to strongly agree than white (41 percent) respondents that they can think of three close (non-family) friends of a race other than their own. People who live in the South (74 percent) and West (79 percent) are more likely to agree than those living in the Midwest (64 percent) or Northeast (65 percent) to agree.“In general, we also found that respondents who are younger and more highly educated are more likely to be accepting of different races, and to be comfortable with diversity,” Jefferts Schori said. “We recognize that youth and young adults, along with the faith community, are key to helping motivate substantive change in our society.” Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT November 12, 2013 at 11:21 pm I agree with Mr. Basta that the article is written in such a way that it doesn’t appear to acknowledge how far this country has progressed. I think many people would agree “that there is at least some discrimination in United States today.” However, this is a far cry from just fifty years ago, when segregation still existed, and fire hoses and police dogs were used on protestors. Spending money on a survey that tells us what the preponderance of Americans already know seems to be a misuse of precious funds in my opinion. If the study were to provide us with specific areas of society where racism is the most prevalent, that would at least seem to be useful if that information were followed up by strategies to promote change, and plans to implement those strategies. Otherwise, we are left with something that is void of any real substance or practical information (much like Mr. Huff Jr’s response to Mr. Basta).I agree that we should not overestimate how much progress we have made, but to not acknowledge how far this society has come in a relatively short time is to not understand where we actually are today. If we don’t know where we are today, then we don’t know how far we’ve come, and we can’t gage how far we need to go. We are not living in the 1950s and 60s. This is a dramatically different society. Yes, there is always more work to do, but can we at least take a breath and appreciate the progress that has been made? Or will we be doomed to constant hand wringing, never appreciating the progress that God has accomplished thus far? Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Jon Spangler says: Gordon May says: Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC November 13, 2013 at 1:58 pm Really? This poll does not reveal anything new. Discrimination is unfortunately inherent in our being and something to fight against. We all discriminate in some form or fashion for good or ill. Replacing “racism” with “discrimination” is extremely disappointing. I wonder if there has been more push back than anticipated about the forum – 50 Years Later: The State of RACISM in America and therefore discrimination has been lifted up as a softball approach. Racism is different. Calling for a church wide forum on this difficult topic took an act of courage. Talking about discrimination is backpedaling away from racism. In 1994 the House of Bishops’ pastoral letter on racism identified it as “sin” and “evil”. Racism continues to exists because we are afraid to address it. Let us not move forward with a spirit of timidity but rather with courage and faith that God moves with us through the pain. Rector Knoxville, TN Rich Basta says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Jane Cutting says: Gerard A. Pisani, Jr + says: Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI November 12, 2013 at 6:05 pm No. Mr. Basta, you are one of the reasons we need surveys like this. You have egg on your face, sir. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

Campus ministries changing to serve new students

first_imgCampus ministries changing to serve new students ‘Be entrepreneurial,’ church says with grants Submit a Press Release Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR By Mary Frances Schjonberg and Pat McCaughanPosted Feb 19, 2015 Report to the Church 2015, Tags Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments are closed. Rector Knoxville, TN Comments (3) Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID February 21, 2015 at 7:21 am Campus ministry is crucial to the Body of Christ. Was proud to see my parish’s college group take up a lot of space at the Ash Wednesday service. Gives me hope for the future. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Richard McClellan says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ February 19, 2015 at 5:40 pm I believe TEC needs to do more work to grab all the “junior” college students it can. There is no TEC presence I am aware of on any of the county college campuses in New Jersey. What a waste! If TEC is refining its strategy then it needs to look at all the possible students not just the low hanging fruit available at 4 year schools. All students deserve the benefit of what TEC offers and vice versa. Pam Ladley says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ecumenical & Interreligious, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Martin Spielman says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The side of A Moveable Feast’s mobile kitchen can be written on, allowing students on each campus that the ministry visits in North Carolina to make the trailer their own. Photo: A Moveable Feast via Facebook[Episcopal News Service] The way students earn university degrees in the United States is changing and Episcopal Church campus ministries are responding creatively.Examples of that innovation, supported by grants from the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, include an interfaith ministry at a state commuter college, a combination food truck and chapel that will visit campuses in North Carolina and a North Dakota effort to provide holistic help to Native American students. (The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is the legal and canonical name under which The Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business, and carries out mission.)“The Episcopal Church’s priorities in campus ministry are following where more students are enrolling these days,” said the Rev. Mike Angell, Episcopal Church missioner for young adult and campus ministries.“Higher education for a lot of students does not look like a four-year college, so we’re trying to get the church to be creative in how they engage campus ministry, to be entrepreneurial. These grants provide seed money to start new projects, new ways of ministering to young adults in higher education: some of whom aren’t full-time students, some of whom are exploring what their educational career will look like.”Campus ministry in North DakotaFor instance, the Diocese of North Dakota is using a $25,000 Leadership Grant awarded by the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society to establish what the Rev. Canon John Floberg calls a holistic ministry to the native students attending Sitting Bull College in Fort Yates on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation and United Tribes Technical College in Bismarck.Floberg is a member of The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council.While spirituality is fundamental to campus ministry “it’s not going to be the only thing that helps a student get through college but it can be one of the things that helps them get through college,” Floberg said, especially among native students who sometimes need more than the usual encouragement and practical help to remain in school. That help can be as basic as finding travel money for a student to return to school after traveling home for a family emergency, he said.Sitting Bull College in Fort Yates, North Dakota, on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, is one of the places where the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is supporting people who are thinking creatively about campus ministry. Photo: Sitting Bull CollegeThe planned ministry would not be a one-way street. The Witayas (“gathered groups” in Sioux) that Floberg hopes to form will use a model of peer support based on the “Sources of Strength” suicide-prevention techniques that were developed in North Dakota. The model would be used for students’ “mutual support in making it through college, getting their degree and doing it with the hope and perseverance that are part of the Christian faith,” Floberg wrote in the November issue of the diocesan newspaper.Floberg, who as a canon missioner is responsible for five congregations spread over 300 miles in North Dakota, both on and off reservations, said the church often has relationships with native students formed when they were in youth groups. Following those students as they transition into college is a “logical next step,” but that step has not always been taken. Both Sitting Bull and United Tribes are “filled with people that you already know and they’re in a transition in life that the church hasn’t paid much attention to,” he said.An added goal of the budding program is to support educational and tribal efforts to help students discern how they might contribute to their communities by using their degree to benefit the tribe, said Floberg, who noted that he was speaking to Episcopal News Service on the 124th anniversary of the death (Dec. 15, 1890) of Sitting Bull, the Sioux chief and holy man who said “Let us put our minds together and see what life we can make for our children.” Floberg added that mentors could also discuss students’ future ministry, lay or ordained.Those are the long-range goals. In the meantime, Floberg offers what might be called the practical basis of much of campus ministry: free food. At Sitting Bull, he provides lunches in the atrium of the sciences building and the program has purchased a mobile grill and smoker for preparing barbecue. The meals are a way to make the church’s presence known and share information about plans for the ministry.On the move in North CarolinaFood was the genesis of A Moveable Feast, a Diocese of North Carolina campus ministry based out of a custom trailer fitted with a kitchen and a prayer space.The idea came to North Carolina Bishop Suffragan Anne Hodges-Copple during her pre-election tour of the diocese. “I just kept talking about the need for us as a diocese not to find gimmicks but to try to be more creative and entrepreneurial in our efforts to give ancient traditions fresh expression in unexpected and yet engaging places,” she told ENS.Hodges-Copple, formerly the Episcopal chaplain at Duke University, said she began to put her desire to minister on “historically ignored and underserved campuses – especially community colleges” together with the ubiquity of food trucks in Durham, North Carolina. When she bounced the idea off the Rev. Nils Chittenden, who at that time was the diocesan minister for youth and the Episcopal chaplain at Duke, he immediately said, “Yes!”A Moveable Feast Coordinator Caitlyn Darnell put it this way: “I was absolutely fascinated by the thing.”The Rev. Nils Chittenden, who at that time was the diocesan minister for youth and the Episcopal chaplain at Duke University, and A Moveable Feast Coordinator Caitlyn Darnell serve hot cider to North Carolina Bishop Suffragan Anne Hodges-Copple during diocesan convention in late November where the mobile campus ministry made its debut. Photo: Diocese of North Carolina via FacebookIt took a long time for Chittenden, Darnell and Hodges-Copple to figure out how to put the idea into practice, and they were cautious about the ministry’s eventual face and image.“There have been a lot of church ventures and start-ups that have tried to do really cool things for the sake of doing a really cool thing, and somebody in their late teens or early twenties looks at it and goes ‘that was pretty dumb,’ ” said Darnell.Darnell works half time for the diocese in her Moveable Feast role and is in the second year of a placement through the Episcopal Service Corps, a partner of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, with The Abraham Project. She works at St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church in Winston-Salem as the formation assistant. The Rev. Stephanie Yancy was appointed diocesan interim missioner for young adult ministry in mid-January, succeeding Chittenden who will become rector of St Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Armonk, New York, in late January. Yancy will direct A Moveable Feast.Although the idea for what became A Moveable Feast began as food truck, Darnell said the group also considered using a bus or a recreational vehicle. Darnell doesn’t remember quite when and how the idea of a custom trailer occurred to her, but now A Moveable Feast moves in a 28-foot specially rigged trailer. There’s room for a small space in the front for individual prayer or conversation with a chaplain, and there’s a kitchen in the back. Remembering her college years at the College of William and Mary, Darnell said, “having the chapel was a really, really important part of what we are doing” because college life can be chaotic and even extroverted students sometimes feel “overstimulated and inundated with things” and in need of a quiet space.Food can be served from a window in the side of the trailer or out the back, which folds down into a stage that can be covered by a tent, Darnell said. An altar for that stage will eventually be commissioned, Darnell said, and food will be served from the altar “so you also get that really cool theology of the Eucharistic supper.”Because the ministry is meant to move among campuses, even the color of the trailer was tricky. The trailer could not feature one school’s team colors over another. During a June meeting at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Durham of local church and campus people who were asked for their ideas about the ministry, the idea arose of having the trailer be a “community chalkboard.” The trailer is black and people at each campus will be invited to write on its sides, making it their own each time it visits.A Moveable Feast hopes to partner with local churches or other local groups who would help in food preparation and serving, and who would be willing to learn how to minister to young adults, Darnell said. They will need to be open to knowing what to expect from this sort of ministry and how it will change your parish experience, she added.The wheels are turning, Darnell said, to establish a presence at Johnson Community College in Smithfield, North Carolina Central University in Durham and Johnson C. Smith College in Charlotte. While Barton College in Wilson is also on their list, those conversations have not yet started, she said. A Moveable Feast hopes to be at Durham Technical Community College this year as well, she added.A Moveable Feast has also helped form community of three young adults, known as companions, who will travel with the truck to be peer mentors/ministers.All of those aspects of A Moveable Feast are connected, Hodges-Copple said, to the story of the risen Jesus on the road to Emmaus on the evening of the first Easter. The ministry hopes to “bring the companionship of Jesus Christ alongside many people, providing a transformative encounter with God in a surprising, somewhat non-traditional context,” according to its website.The ministry received a two-year, $30,000 Leadership Grant from the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society in November 2013.Meanwhile, in Southern CaliforniaOn the other side of the country, food is not the basis for the Rev. Sean Lanigan’s ministry at California State University Long Beach although “I tried first to build a conventional Bible study and pizza campus ministry,” he said of his arrival two years ago.It didn’t seem to work at the 40,000-student commuter campus, so he set about learning what would. He quickly discovered “what did seem to work was getting excited about interfaith.”And activism. The ministry quickly became known as the “Interfaith Project” and has since developed a core group of about a dozen predominantly Muslim and Jewish students who have tackled such issues as women’s empowerment and faith and climate.“It has become a growing, emerging gathering of students interested in building relationships across boundaries … [and] learning how to live in a world of difference,” said Lanigan.Some members of the Interfaith Project campus ministry at the California State University Long Beach join the Rev. Sean Lanigan to celebrate the recent holiday season.That interest makes it different to most other campus groups, he said. “Cal State Long Beach is incredibly diverse and incredibly stratified, but there are not a lot of groups on campus that transcend boundaries.”The ministry is a joint effort of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, said Lanigan, an Episcopal priest in the Diocese of Los Angeles. Lanigan and the ministry are based at Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church in Long Beach. The Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles, the ELCA and its Southern California Synod provide ongoing financial support, he said. A board of Episcopalians and Lutherans, both clergy and laity, developed the partnership and continues to guide the development of the campus ministry and a new worshiping community called Holy Grounds.A recent $5,000 Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society grant will help fund continuation of the ministry, including supporting the presence of Dominique Bocanegra, a part-time Episcopal Urban Intern who assists as an organizer and mission developer, Lanigan said.Until she began serving with the Interfaith Project in August, Bocanegra, 23, didn’t “realize how interconnected faith really is and how it relates to what’s happening in the United States and across the globe.”The Interfaith Project addresses the core of many issues, she added: “There’s so much tension –  to me, it’s because of a lack of dialogue, a lack of relationships.”She hopes to help focus students’ efforts on issues of justice because “not every homeless person is Christian; not everyone suffering from drought is Muslim. We don’t have to sit here and say, ‘you need to become my religion,’ but, through my experience and my eyes you can hear how we view the drought: This is how we see our brothers and sisters on the street.”Aliyah Shaikh, 19, an international studies student focusing on the Middle East and North Africa, said the Interfaith Project gives her a space to make friendships with people of different backgrounds.“The Interfaith Project seems to be the only group of students that meets in that sort of capacity,” said Shaikh, a member of the Muslim Student Association board.She estimated that about 70 to 80 percent of the core group is young Muslim women. The remaining 20 to 30 percent are usually students from Beach Hillel, the Jewish student organization, and one regular attendee was Buddhist.“We’ve had challenges getting more Christian attendees, and we’re trying to think of ways to reach out to each other,” she said.Lanigan agreed. “We’re trying to build as many collaborations on campus as possible,” he said. “We’re trying to be interested in what’s going on, on campus and much more broadly, and how religion can be part of that. We’re not sitting around philosophizing about God, although that can be a part of it, sometimes. Mainly, we’re talking about how we as humans share this work together.”A budget based on missionThe 2013-2015 budget passed by General Convention allotted $300,000 in campus ministry grants (Line 67 here). Those grants are part of the ways in which the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is responding to the second Mark of Mission which calls on members of the Anglican Communion to teach, baptize and nurture new believers. Specifically, the grants are meant to establish or revitalize campus ministries and imagine new ways to reach young adults who traditionally are the least likely to seek out a campus ministry.In its recent Report to the Church the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society noted that it has awarded $204,348 thus far.General Convention also specifically called for two new campus ministries to be established at community colleges, tribal colleges or other two-year institutions of higher education in each of the church’s nine provinces of the Episcopal Church. Resolution C069 also called for training for local campus ministry leaders.The resolution, sponsored by Province VI, noted “the increasing importance of community colleges as critical places for evangelism and Christian formation, particularly among racially, ethnically, and socioeconomically diverse populations.”Angell told ENS that “the opportunity is really high because ‘community college’ is almost a contradiction in terms or a misnomer because in so many community colleges there’s no community at all.”“So what does it look like to build community in a situation where you’re not competing with a hundred thousand other clubs and fraternities and sororities?” he asked. “You’ve got students to whom the presence means a lot and the chance to have community in the midst of a non-traditional education situation is really high.”Angell also noted that community colleges are becoming the higher-education entry point for students of immigrant communities. Those students are often the first in their families to go to college and they need strong support, he added.“We’re not just supporting non-traditional Episcopal students; we’re trying to support non-traditional college students,” Angell said.Convention structured the current triennial budget around the Communion’s Five Marks of Mission and provided significant unallocated sums for new work targeted around each Mark of Mission. The intention was that the resulting work would be done in new, collaborative partnerships with dioceses and congregations. The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society has provided seed money and/or matching grants as well as staff support and expertise for the new work.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter of the Episcopal News Service. The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ March 12, 2015 at 1:55 am The whole article above was so amazing – the reaching out to the native students in ND, the Movable Feast venture in NC, and the interfaith uniting activities in CA have restored my hopes that people can work together and actually love each other while experiencing diversity – Hooray! Youth & Young Adults Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY last_img read more

Young Anglican academics offered research fellowship in Japan

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Young Anglican academics offered research fellowship in Japan Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Asia, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Anglican Communion, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY [Anglican Communion News Service] The Nippon Sei Ko Kai (NSKK), the Anglican Church in Japan, is offering young Anglican academics the opportunity to undertake a fully funded 18-month research fellowship in Tokyo. Applications are particularly sought from Anglicans in the developing countries of Asia, Africa and Latin America.The Bishop Williams Memorial Fund – named after the Rt. Rev. Channing Moore Williams, a missionary of the U.S.-based Episcopal Church who made a substantial contribution to the establishment of the Church in Japan – was established by the NSKK’s General Synod in 1977. It funds both a visiting lecture program and a visiting research scheme.It is currently inviting applications for the research program from graduates under the age of 35. Applicants need to be a member of a Christian church and have the endorsement of an Anglican bishop.The successful applicant will be given airfare to and from Japan at the beginning and end of the program; and for a return journey home midway through the 18-month term. They will also be provided with single-person living quarters and a monthly stipend of ¥100,000 (JPY, approximately £640 GBP). Tuition fees will be waived and the researcher will be also be given an allowance of ¥700,000 (JPY, approximately £4,500 GBP) for field study and research.In creating the Bishop Williams Memorial Fund, the NSKK was mindful of the educational establishments he created, based firmly on Christian values and principles.“More than 135 years have passed since these schools were founded by Williams, and today they occupy prominent positions among the thousands of educational institutions in Japan. Indeed, they have produced some of Japan’s most respected leaders in various fields of endeavor,” the NSKK says. “Yet when we view the overall situation of our Japanese society and education, we are made aware of the continuing need to exert every effort to carry out the mission entrusted to us by Bishop Williams: to undergird the education and research conducted at our educational institutions with the precepts of Christianity and the spirit of Christian faith.”The program envisages that the visiting researcher will undertake their research at the Rikkyo University or another of the NSKK’s educational institutions. But if the required facilities are unavailable at NSKK centers, arrangements will be made to use facilities at other institutions.The researcher may be asked to give informal lectures on their research field to faculty and students in those institutions, so that “in the environment of an educational institution, there will be a meaningful interchange of thought and values in some depth,” the NSKK say.Applicants need to be proficient in English. The program will begin in October with a six-month intensive course in the Japanese language ahead of the beginning of the research program at the start of Japan’s academic year in April.Further details and an application form can be downloaded from the NSKK website (pdf). Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Youth & Young Adults By Gavin DrakePosted Jun 23, 2016 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more