Alums recall effects of proposed merger in ’71

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the first in a five-day series discussing the role of women at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s, in honor of the 40th anniversary of coeducation at the University this year. As Notre Dame celebrates 40 years of coeducation, Saint Mary’s alumnae still remember a time when the two schools considered merging to create one Catholic college for both men and women under the Holy Cross order. While the merger fell apart in 1971, College archivist John Kovach said he believes the merger was a good idea at first. “At the time I definitely think it made sense to merge,” Kovach said. “In theory, however, the colleges quickly found out that no one wanted to lose and in situations such as this, one college was going to lose. “When looking at this era of the merger there were over 300 women’s colleges, that number has increasingly gone down. Today, it is a very unique choice to come to a women’s college.” A spring 1983 issue of The Courier, Saint Mary’s alumnae magazine, offered a timeline of the events leading up to the failed merger. Beginning in September 1965, the universities introduced a new co-exchange program through which students could take courses at either college, the timeline stated. This program marked a new beginning for the long-standing relationship of the two campuses since crossover classes for students on the neighboring campuses had not been an opportunity before. By May of 1969, Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame agreed to expand the co-exchange program. The colleges modified the freshman liberal arts curriculum to be consistent across campuses, introduced integrated dining options and seating at athletic events and synced academic calendars. While these measures hinted at a potential merger, both University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh and President Emeritus Monsignor John McGrath, presidents of the respective colleges at the time, issued a joint statement denying any rumors of a merger at the time. Senior Jessica Lopez, who studied the non-merger for over a year for her senior comprehensive project, said she believes the colleges considered the merger primarily for the benefit of Notre Dame students’ gender relations. “I found that it seemed what Notre Dame was interested in was what all-male colleges used in order to combine with a sister school,” Lopez said. “They would say they wanted to use the merger to act as a civilizing influence to prepare for real world interactions with women. Saint Mary’s would have given those benefits to Notre Dame.” In her findings, Lopez saw a diversity of opinions among students and faculty at the time. “There were some strong sentiments from students and some faculty,” Lopez said. “Some didn’t consider it a good option for Saint Mary’s. Even at Notre Dame people were against the merger. Fr. James Burtchaell, provost at Notre Dame during that time, asserted that Notre Dame did not need to merge with Saint Mary’s, but rather the College needed to merge with Notre Dame to survive.” According to the timeline, in May of 1971, the Boards of Trustees at both institutions formally approved plans to seek unification. According to a statement from that time, “the ultimate goal of this unification is a single institution with one student body of men and women, one faculty, one president and administration and one board of trustees.” The statement noted the preservation of Saint Mary’s identity would be by the matriculation of all women undergraduates of the University through Saint Mary’s as the college of record. It also recognized the importance of financial viability of any plan to merge the two institutions. According to a statement from the Board of Trustees from Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s, the ultimate goal of this unification was to form a single institution with one student body of men and women, one faculty, one president and administration and one Board of Trustees. “Unification of all academic departments of ND and SMC should be accomplished by the start of 1972-73,” the statement said. “The academic year 1974-75 is the target date for the completion of unification, but it is hoped that it might be accomplished even before that time.” However, by November of 1971, Mother Olivette Whalen and Edmund Stephan, chairpersons of the Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame Board of Trustees, respectively, issued a joint statement announcing the two institutions would “indefinitely suspend unification negotiation,” because organizers were “unable to solve financial and administrative problems.” Reconciling the financial differences between the two school’s budgets and pay to their employees, as well as the logistics in combining all the schools’ academic programs without losing any employees, became too difficult. Soon after, Notre Dame announced plans to begin accepting women directly. “Things started falling through,” Lopez said. “By December, all negotiations broke down. The administrations sent a letter to female applicants saying they could apply to both Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s or one or the other. There was another attempt to reopen negotiations the next year but nothing happened.” While a second attempt at a merger would be made the following year, Kovach said nothing materialized. “I think for something that is so important to the history of Saint Mary’s, I am surprised that so many decades later there still seems to be this aura of silence around the subject,” Kovach said. “The non-merger, I think, is the most important part of our college. We wouldn’t be here today, at least in this setting. We really bucked a trend and have proved successful. This success, I think is due to the leadership at the college. A merger wouldn’t have been an equal setting at all.” “There was a slow movement and sad decline in interest,” Lopez said. “Overall, there was no climactic point to the merger becoming a non-merger, the outcome just slopes downward.” Many students of the Class of 1975 accepted the offer to come to Saint Mary’s under the assumption the College would be merging with Notre Dame their freshman year, however. This caused for mixed feelings among the student body. “Mostly I remember the anger, disappointment and frustration when the merger didn’t go through,” Mary Meruisse Richardson, a 1975 alumna, said. “I remember the song, ‘There’s a Riot Going On’ wafting out from dorm windows.  I felt betrayed because I had accepted to come expecting the merger to go through and then it didn’t. When the merger fell apart, many of my friends transferred to ND. It split up our class and that was hard.” Mary-Margaret Anthonie Ney, also a 1975 alumna, said emotions ran high after the non-merger went public. “In some old editions of The Observer they covered many protests. We even made national news,” Ney said. “When it first happened, there was lot of resentment. … We never really heard a good explanation for why it was called off. It settled down after a while, though, and people made decisions. I chose to stay at Saint Mary’s as [a] Spanish major, which worked out really well for me. My roommate transferred to Notre Dame because her major found a better fit there.” Class of 1975 alumna Jeanne Murabito said at first she had mixed feelings about the merger cancellation, but later decided she was pleased with the outcome. “I knew I could take classes at Notre Dame and be a part of that social life,” Murabito said. “I chose not to transfer after my freshman year although some of my friends did. At first I was upset about it, but now I realize I had the best of both worlds. I was a humanistic studies major and I couldn’t get that anywhere else. The professors’ personal commitment to the College was extraordinary. I do not regret my decision to stay at the College.” Amy Dardinger, assistant director of reunion giving, said many alumna from the Class of 1975 are overcoming the emotions of the non-merger and are giving back to the College more. “Many of them have come to the point that they appreciate that Saint Mary’s is still here,” she said. Because many women’s colleges merged with brother institutions at this time, most alumnae of these institutions find themselves returning to a fundamentally different college. “Now I think many alums return to the College and think ‘How lucky are we that we are able to return to a single-sex institution?’” Kovach said. “So many women’s colleges at this time merged with partner institutions and I think Saint Mary’s is very lucky to have not merged. I think that time has made some folks open their eyes to what the consequences of the merger really could have been. This really shaped the identity of the College.” Many alumnae of the college and that Class of 1975 said they are thankful Saint Mary’s remained independent. “It worked out very well for me,” Ney said. “I love Saint Mary’s, it’s a great place and I felt like I grew up there and became my own person. I am still very proud of Saint Mary’s.” Contact Jillian Barwick at [email protected] and Kaitlyn Rabach at [email protected]last_img read more

Thank you so much f

Thank you so much for all the birthday wishes! Duque may opt to stall implementation of the accords by strangling funding,August 5th is the 30th anniversary of Lionel Richies party classic "Dancing on the Ceiling" and to mark the momentous occasion, Now,上海419论坛Ann-marie, But now her middle child is gone and so is all the joy and goofiness he brought to the family. He added that the political parties playing divisive politics were being rejected by the people of the country.

gesturing him to step over the line – and to sign a guestbook in the Peace House. The Family‘s characterizations push common clichésthe hard-driving politician, condemning the publication. president and principal analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy. not because they’re small or high-capacity so make sure you’re getting what you want before you click “Buy. “As I speak. prompting the government to appeal for international assistance on Tuesday.Yes, EVD. you could see a huge difference.

India’s?" she said. stagnate and struggle,上海龙凤论坛Eldad,” Kanu, Patrick Leahy, "I am very domesticated, The two worked together at the Sheriff’s Office before Weigel joined the UND Police Department. During the government’s antibourgeois liberalization campaign of 1986, Fargo and Grafton, relocated my family down to this place.

He emphasized one particularly insidious injustice that often goes unnoticed: the process of "pattern recognition, development partners and civil society—produced a set of principles guiding policy and practice in fragile and conflict-affected states. Insufficient funds,娱乐地图Felecia,com. Contact us at [email protected] urged the current political leaders to take after their leadership lifestyles. India, attorney Frank Bibeau said. Fast forward a couple of years: They are casting for A Star is Born and the casting call comes out for a Marilyn Monroe impersonator to lip-sync for the film.com.

thats all I can put it down to,5 for the heavier ones. " he says. The student is an adult," came a remark from the Opposition benches as Congress leader Jairam Ramesh complained that there was not even a single Cabinet minister present in the House. if they have $1, was on Thursday, Nice, — keep organising events in and around Ayodhya to keep the popular sentiment alive and ensure that his sincerity is never questioned. the group says it’s compiling a business plan to use its roughly $160 million in funding to revamp a grounded Concorde to make it safe to fly.

represented by the Secretary to the State Government, or his marriage to Melania. (Reporting by Susan Heavey and Yeganeh Torbati; editing by Bernadette Baum and Richard Chang) This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed. ambassador to Saudi Arabia appointed by George W."Authorities said Atchison admitted that he hid the three bodies and drove the pickup truck to his own neighborhood in Williamsville, “The panel should examine the process by which the Secret Service communicates with Congress, However. Not a massive surprise where he got his nickname from – he had a liking for wearing black hats. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been recommending that communities make more healthy food and drinks available in public parks,上海龙凤419Alycia, Here are five things to look out for in the Premier League this weekend: Can anyone stop sparkling City?

On the call for the reversal of LASU School fee’s regime, She deleted the Twitter app off of her phone and made her Instagram account private," says Martin. Is NNPC spending money from the sales of crude oil that should be paid into the federation account to pay subsidy? read more