Manufacturing Solutions 2018 will return to Limerick Institute of Technology

first_imgNewsEducationManufacturing Solutions 2018 will return to Limerick Institute of TechnologyBy Staff Reporter – March 29, 2018 1710 Limerick’s Student Radio Station Wired FM Celebrates 25 Years on Air Limerick colleges recognised at Irish Games Fleadh 2020 TAGScook medicalexhibitorsGTMAJulia MooreLimerick Institute of TechnologyManufacturing SolutionsShannonVicent Cunanne Limerick Institute of Technology researcher calls for ban on cigarette vending machines Twitter Email RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Limerick Institute of Technology launch new app to facilitate energy renovation upskilling center_img Previous articleNew guide by Limerick City and County Council to help public plan for main summer festivalsNext articleNews in briefs and round-ups Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Limerick Institute of Technology awarded €750,000 capital grant towards works on its five campuses Facebook Pictured are, from left, Maria Kyne, Head of Department of the Built Environment Management, LIT, Professor Vincent Cunnane, President, LIT, Julia Moore, Chief Executive Officer, GTMA, and David Beattie, General Manager, GTMA.Picture: Diarmuid GreeneManufacturing Solutions 2018, hosted by GTMA* and LIT, returns to the Limerick Institute of Technology this June, and is set to break all previous records with the number of exhibitors increasing by 25%.The tool technologies trade association hosted the first ever manufacturing supply chain roadshow outside of the UK in association with LIT in 2017, with the largest ever number of people in the 75 year history of the GTMA in attendance.Manufacturing Solutions 2018 promises to surpass the success of the 2017 event, as all exhibition spaces for 2018 were sold out by the end of last year.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up In total more than 100 of the most advanced providers of metrology, inspection, machine tools, work holding, cutting tools, and Cad/Cam/PLM manufacturing software and ancillary products and services will be exhibiting in LIT’s Moylish Campus on Wednesday June 13, 2018 as part of Manufacturing Solutions 2018.New sponsors – Shannon IASC and Cook Medical – and supporters have also come on board for an event that has proven to be a conduit for creating closer relations and profitable opportunities between companies in the UK and Ireland, as well as introducing customers and suppliers to each other.Presentations from leading industrialists and keynote speakers will focus on lean, medical and aerospace, with time allocated for question and answer sessions.GTMA Chief Executive Officer, Julia Moore, said “Last year when we brought Manufacturing Solutions to LIT we were very aware of the importance of creating strong working relationships between Irish and UK companies post Brexit, but what we achieved far surpassed those hopes.“On the back of that successful event, and with the continuous expansion of the manufacturing industry in the Mid West of Ireland, it does not surprise us that this year’s event is growing beyond anything we could have envisaged 12 months ago.LIT President Professor Vincent Cunanne said, “It is fitting that GTMA and LIT continue this successful relationship and bring Manufacturing Solutions 2018 back to Limerick. The Mid West region is central in the Irish manufacturing sector, and has been for much of the history of the state.“LIT plays a leading role in ensuring that manufacturing in this region continues to have the ability to adapt and to change and remain at the cutting edge when it comes to technology. Meanwhile GTMA brings all the leading technology suppliers together, so that industry can also benefit from their knowledge, products and technology.”“LIT is therefore delighted to be part of this event that not only allows us to build strong partnerships but facilitates an exchange of ideas,” added Prof Cunnane.Manufacturing Solutions 2018 is also supported by Enterprise Ireland, Fáilte Ireland, Limerick Chamber, Shannon Chamber and Regional Skills.The event will take place in LIT, Moylish Campus on Wednesday June 13, 2018 from 8.30am to 5pm.For more information and to register for the showcase, please visit www.manufacturingsolutions.ie.More about education here. Advertisement Limerick Institute of Technology president takes up office as Chair of THEA board for 2020 Print Linkedinlast_img read more

Time to put your cards on the table

first_imgTime to put your cards on the tableOn 22 Jul 2003 in Personnel Today The Information and Consultation Directive will take time and resources toimplement, which is why HR must ensure it is not left to the last minute.Roisin Woolnough reportsEmployers need to think long and hard about how they communicate businessnews and changes to staff, following the Government’s announcement on theInformation and Consultation Directive. While the legislation itself does notrequire companies to have an employee consultative body, it does stipulate thatif just 10 per cent of the workforce demand it, then the company must provideit. What form that consultative body takes is to a certain extent left up to theemployer. The framework has taken into account the varied nature of existingarrangements between employers and employees, some of which are highlysuccessful, and the DTI has avoided a one-size fits all approach. One thing the DTI, employer and employee industry bodies are all agreed uponis that companies should at the very least establish if they comply with thedirective and what the business implications are. Any organisations that fallfoul of the directive could face a fine of up to £75,000. “HR people are going to want to drive this initiative, rather thanrespond to demands from employees,” says Ken Allison, Head of HRConsulting at Bond Pearce. “There are good business reasons for doing itahead of time, so that you have the machinery in place and representatives canhandle their roles well.” The EU-legislation takes effect for companies with 150 employees or more inMarch 2005, in 2007 for those with 100 or more employees and in 2008 for thosewith 50 or more employees. Information and consultation means just that and nothing more. “People tend to think consultation is the same as negotiation, but itis not,” says Patrick Burns, director of advocacy for The Work Foundationconsultancy and think-tank. “Consultation still very much leaves decisionmaking in managers’ hands. The directive says a company must be prepared tolisten to employees’ views, state its own views and then make a decision,”he adds. The legislation came about because of EU concerns about the number ofcompanies making public announcements about fundamental changes to their businesses– such as restructuring and mass redundancies – with no prior warning to staff.Employees have to be informed and consulted on management decisions thataffect their future, and the consultation has to be meaningful. It also needsto be done right down to departmental level and at the time the decision-makingprocess is taking place – not when plans have already been finalised. “If the board signs this off, saying ‘Yes we must consult’, but thenthey go through the motions at national level, then there is a problem,”says Burns. “All the personnel we have spoken to said consultations haveto take place while there are still options and the decision can still beaffected.” If companies only pay lip service to the notion of consultation, Burns believesemployees and unions could bring about cases of non-compliance. “If I had to predict a potential flashpoint,” says Burns, “itwould be confidentiality. Accidental exposure is a problem, but not if peoplelearn from good management.” A major concern expressed by employers is that employee reps will leaksensitive corporate information, but Burns sees no reason why this shouldhappen if they understand what is expected of them. He says representativesneed to be given good training to ensure issues such as confidentiality are notbreached. Senior and middle management also need to understand just what theprocess entails, what information needs to be disseminated and when it shouldhappen. “It is very important to work out if both sides feel confident thatthey have the skills to deal with this,” says Burns. “Clarity is veryimportant as accidents of confidentiality often happen because protocols andprocedures are not clear enough.” It is up to HR to set the guidelines, audit the systems already in place,provide the framework, organise elections and monitor progress. That wholeprocess takes time and resources, which is why it is important that it is notleft until the very last minute. “It’s very hard to see how an organisation will get something set upthat is credible, functioning and compliant in under six months,” saysBurns. “You need to find out how well your system works and match it torequirements and have effective dialogue with employee representatives and atboard level.” Global companies also need to bear in mind how their EU counterpartsinteract with employees. “There are issues around links between UK arrangements and Europeanarrangements,” says Allison. “The works council in the UK would haveto nominate a rep to the EU council, which might be a lot more trade-uniondominated.” This could be tricky for employers and it’s up to HR to negotiate itsuccessfully. Whatever happens, Allison says that for employee councils to beeffective, companies need to set them up and treat them in an appropriatemanner. “Make sure it’s not imposed from the top – implement it in aconsultative way,” he says. weblinks www.cbi.org.uk www.dti.gov.uk  www.tuc.org.uk  www.theworkfoundation.co.uk  Philippa James, HR Officer at AlfalvalThe sales and services arm of Swedish process engineering manufacturerAlfalaval has had an employee representative body since mid-1999. “We started it because we had a new managing director who was very muchinto being open and communicating with employees,” says HR officerPhilippa James. Called the Employee Consultative Forum, it meets three times a year withfive representatives from different divisions of the business. Representativesfrom the UK’s 200-strong workforce are elected for a two-year period. “Employees can ask most questions they want to, particularly thingssuch as whether there are any areas that cause problems and office improvementsin working methods,” says James. The company will not discuss any issues that are deemed strictlyconfidential or anything relating to particular individuals, and the forum doesnot cover minor workplace issues, such as washroom provisions. “That’s forthe facilities people,” says James. Before each meeting, the agenda is set out so that suggestions can be putforward, and James says that employee opinion surveys show the staff feel theforum is working. On the question ‘I’m kept well informed on the company’sprogress’, the opinion surveys show that 50 per cent of employees agreed in2002, compared with 34.2 per cent in 2001. And the staff response to ‘Thecompany does a good job of keeping employees informed about matters affectingus’, showed an increase of 25 per cent from 2001 to 40.4 per cent in 2002. James feels the forum is fairly well aligned with the directive, althoughshe feels the company may need to make the processes a bit more in-depth in thefuture. www.alfalaval.com Information and consultation regulationsWhen will the regulations begin toapply to my company?Organisations which employ more than 150 employees will be liableto act on a staff request to set up a new information and consultation(I&C) body (a works council) from 23 March 2005 onwards. Where the organisations have more than 100 employees, theoperational date is 23 March 2007, and where the undertakings have more than 50employees, the operational date is 23 March 2008. As from those dates, the lawdoes not require employers to do anything. However, if requested by theiremployees, they will from those operational dates be required to commencenegotiations on the setting up of an information and consultation body/workscouncil. How will such a request for aninformation and consultation body/works council be triggered?Employers will be required to set up an I&C body when theyreceive a petition of more than 100 employees from within the undertaking. Thiskickstarts a process whereby the employer has six months in which to negotiatean I&C agreement. If an agreement is not reached, a lead-in period of afurther six months will operate, at the end of which the ‘default model’I&C body will automatically operate. In the next six months, the employer has the opportunity tocontinue to try to reach an agreement on a voluntary I&C body and/or toarrange the transition arrangements for the operation of the I&C defaultmodel.What is the position where myorganisation already has an I&C-type body such as a staff consultativeforum? Will this have to be disbanded?Unlike the position for European works councils, having anexisting agreed I&C body is not a complete defence to stop new negotiationsproceeding to set up a works council under the I&C regulations. However,the draft regulations do provide some limited measure of support in thissituation. Existing I&C arrangements can remain in place unless and until aformal petition, from more than 10 per cent of employees, is received. Where the employer wishes to preserve its existing staffconsultative forum, it has the option to call a ballot of all the employees inthe undertaking to vote on whether they want to proceed with the statutoryI&C negotiation process. If less than 40 per cent vote in favour ofprogressing with the negotiation for a new I&C agreement, then the employercan continue with the existing employee consultative forum, and the employeescannot submit a new petition for an I&C negotiation for a period of threeyears. Where the original petition to set the I&C negotiationprocess into motion is signed by at least 40 per cent of the employees in theundertaking, there is no entitlement for an employer to hold a ballot. Theemployer is forced to go ahead with the negotiation for a new I&Cagreement. What does the default modelprovide for?The draft regulations provide for information andconsultation in three areas:– The recent and probable development of the undertaking’sactivities and the economic situation– The current situation, structure and probable development ofemployment within the undertaking and any anticipated measures envisaged whichmay put a threat on employment within the undertaking– Decisions likely to lead to substantial changes in workorganisation or contractual relations, including collective redundancy and TUPEtransfersIn the first two of these, consultation is described as”an exchange of views or establishment for dialogue”. In the third –substantial changes in contractual relations and work organisation –consultation is defined as “with a view to reaching agreement”. Itshould be noted that this ‘higher’ level of consultation comes close to a formof negotiation, and would include subjects such as terms and conditions, hoursof work, methods of work, places of work, use of machinery and equipment atwork, changed methods of working, and so on.  Interestingly, the I&C Regulations referto “decisions likely to lead to substantial changes of work organisationand contractual relations”. In addition, the default model has provisions relating toconfidentiality. Unlike the position for European works councils, the draftregulations (in their current form) limit the employer’s ability to withholdconfidential information to where disclosure of it would, judged objectively,seriously harm or prejudice the undertaking. What is the timeframe for myorganisation to negotiate an I&C agreement before the default modelstructure is applied?There is an initial negotiation period of six months, beginningwith the date when the petition for the start of the negotiation process isreceived by the employer. If an agreement is not reached by the end of thatperiod, the default model will automatically apply, but there is a furthersix-month lead-in period for the employer to make arrangements for this – forexample, employee elections. At any time, the parties can extend the period ofnegotiations for an I&C agreement. Employers must do the following, all within the six-monthperiod:– Carry out an audit of its existing I&C arrangements– Develop a strategy on I&C– Educate and brief senior management– Manage employee expectations– Devise and implement the employee communication programmes onI&C– Develop an I&C agreement with which to begin negotiations– Train line managers on I&C– Arrange for the election of employee representatives tonegotiate the I&C agreement– Actually negotiate the I&C agreementSix months is a very short timescale to do all this, and ithighlights the importance of doing the preparatory work well ahead of the March2005 deadline.Compiled by Fraser Younson,partner, McDermott, Will & EmeryFive key points for hrKen Allison’s five key points that HRneeds to get right:– Have clear and realistic expectations of what the processwill deliver and what it is for, so that employees do not think it is anegotiating body– Display a willingness to discuss substantial issues soemployees find it meaningful– Ensure staff representatives are trained properly andunderstand their roles– Manage the agenda and communications strategy. Everyone needsto know when consultation is going on– Ensure that senior management commitment is visibleThe legalitiesThe legislation comes into effect forcompanies of:– 150 employees or more in March 2005– 100 employees or more in March 2007– 50 employees or more in March 2008Employee requests only have to be acted upon if 10 per cent ofthe workforce are behind the motion. If the employer already has a consultative agreement withemployees, then 40 per cent of the workforce need to endorse the 10 per centrequest for a review to be mandatory. How the directive is implemented is up tothe employer and employees to decide, unless they cannot agree, in which casethere are standard directive provisions.Claire Logan, organisationalchange manager at SafewaySafeway set up what it callsColleague Councils in March this year. It started with four councils and hassince added another. “We have gone for a staged implementation approach andthen we will roll it out across the whole company,” says Claire Logan,organisational change manager at Safeway, which employs 90,000 in its 480stores across the UK. Each council meets once a month, with between seven and 10representatives, and two weeks later, representatives from those councils go toa Total Council Meeting. “Individual council meetings provide the agenda for theTotal Council Meeting,” says Logan. “That ranges from discussionsabout pensions through to piloting a corporate training programme. If there areparticular initiatives we are wanting to work through we talk to them prior togetting board approval.”Logan says there have been teething problems in the informationflow. “The timing of the meetings is a challenge,” she says.”You need to balance how often you meet with having enough time for peopleto get feedback on the outcomes and generate ideas and suggestions. You need toget that right for it to be effective.”Each council member represents between 50-100 people and 47members have been trained so far. The training focuses on the legal issues.There are council sponsors at a senior level and meetings arechaired by an HR facilitator. Logan says acting as a facilitator swallows upsome HR hours, as does typing up the minutes, but that they have also savedtime and resources through trialling the training programme with the reps. www.safeway.co.uk Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

A Tribute To Butch Trucks On His 70th Birthday, With Thoughts On Col. Bruce Hampton

first_imgToday would have been Butch Trucks‘ 70th birthday. The legendary drummer and original member of the Allman Brothers Band tragically died earlier this year, a reality I haven’t been able to stop thinking about — especially after experiencing the loss of Col. Bruce Hampton last week. Butch was my “godfather,” while Col. Bruce Hampton my dear friend. Two of rock and roll’s greatest influences have passed on, but their stories and legacies will always endure. The key to grieving has been to celebrate life — to share memories, music, and all the people that connect them together.When people tell me they’re sorry for my loss, I often respond that it’s a greater loss for rock and roll and everyone that is a part of that world. It’s occurred to me more recently how instrumental Butch and Bruce were to our community, to our scene. The outpour of stories from fans and musicians alike prove just how accessible, how meaningful they both were to our circle. The relationship between Butch and Bruce goes back as far as the beginning of the Allman Brothers Band; without one or the other, it seems as though each would not be the same.Oteil Burbridge Pens Touching Tribute To His Musical Mentor, The Late Col. Bruce HamptonAs a tribute to Butch’s birthday, the big 7-0, I’d like to share the speech that I delivered at his memorial service in Macon, Georgia on February 20, 2017 at the Cox Capitol Theatre. It was an honor to share my portion of his story amongst the many greats in the room, though I’ll admit a little intimidating to speak alongside Warren Haynes, Johnny Podell, Oteil Burbridge, Jaimoe, Kirk West, and the familial relatives that helped color Butch’s life.But I knew it had to be done. My story wasn’t like any of theirs.When Vaylor asked me to speak today, I was honored — but slightly disoriented. I’m not a blood relative, I never played music with him. I don’t have any stories from the road. He’s just a man who demanded I call him “Uncle Butch” for the last twenty years of my life. I guess that’s pretty special.I met the Trucks family when I was seven years old after they moved to my hometown of Palm Beach. It never really made sense to me why they lived there. I don’t think he made sense of it either, but it brought Butch together with my Dad who became one of his closest friends and mentors. That seemed to be a life-changing friendship for all of us.As my Dad’s been there to help the Trucks family through all this, it’s given me a chance to see how great of an impact that relationship has had on my personal life. Sure, it’s pretty cool that my first concert ever was Frogwings [a band made up of Jimmy Herring, Derek Trucks, Oteil Burbridge, Kofi Burbridge, Edwin McCain, Marc Quiñones, and Butch Trucks] and that I’ve seen the Allman Brothers play more times than I can count, but all those experiences came with great life lessons.Growing up backstage with the Allman Brothers Band provided me with a lifetime of unteachable moments. Where to sit, where to stand, when to hustle; who to ask, who not to ask, when to know your place. Thanks to people like Bert [Holman] and Stacey [Maranz], I learned the etiquette of the industry surrounded by legends. With respect being the overarching theme, I learned very quickly how to act around others.What Butch taught me most, though, was how to act on my own. Every gift he gave me was signed “Eat A Peach” and it wasn’t until my college poetry class that I truly understood what that meant, at least, in theory, according to Butch: it was inspired by a quote from Duane Allman that perhaps came from a line of T.S. Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.”After going back and forth in his own mind about making a decision inspired by love, the narrator asks: “Shall I part my hair behind? Do I dare to eat a peach?” In this context, the peach — whatever the thinker chooses to let it represent — becomes a metaphor for life, for risk. It is something one must experience before growing old.To eat a peach is a choice. While the fruit is inevitably messy, it is equally delectable. It gets stuck in your teeth, drips down your shirt, and sticks to your hands, but we still choose to eat them for the satisfaction that we crave. If you dare to eat a peach, you are willing to accept the outcome. Dichotomously, a peach is both sweet and sour, soft and hard, smooth and fuzzy. It’s delicious, but you must eat it with full willingness to get messy – because, you know, you can always change your shirt.Whatever the peach might represent to you, it’s worth taking the first bite.The quote that supposedly inspired the album name came from an interview question about helping the revolution, to which Duane responded: “There ain’t no revolution, only evolution, but every time I’m in Georgia I ‘eat a peach’ for peace.”I know Butch evolved in a profound way after Duane died. A conversation doesn’t go by without citing a reference or telling a story that’s Skydog-related. I may only have been around for the last two decades, but I still reaped the benefits of the wisdom from a man I never knew — and so did all of my friends and family who ever met or spoke with Butch.That’s one of the things that made him so special; he might act like he knows far more than everyone on the planet, but Duane Allman was the exception. Those two shared a mind, and I’m honored to have tapped into it as much as I have.Keeping with the rhythms of life, Butch’s influence on me is never-ending. He flicked a switch in me when I first saw him play. I quickly realized that music had the ingredients to change a life. As I grew older, I centered this passion to become part of my career.My experience in the music industry truly began when Butch started his Roots Rock Revival camp in Big Indian, NY. With Oteil, Luther, Cody, and more of the extended rock and roll family, I found the light of what it means to bring people together — for the love of the music. That camp started almost four years ago, and I saw Butch grow brighter and brighter every summer because of it. He was the happiest I’d ever seen him, ever. And he changed so many lives by doing what he did.It’s hard to think that a soul that loud could just disappear. I’ve never met a bigger character in my entire life, and I know that his voice will live on through each and every one that he’s ever met.It is my life mission to spread his gospel, to eat a peach for peace, and to honor him in my decisions, both personally and professionally. I’m so grateful to have met all of you as a result of my incomparable relationship with this man.After Butch’s service, I had dinner with Col. Bruce. He brought us to this odd, off-the-highway restaurant with fluorescent lights that served both Indian and Mediterranean food. They were about to close but stayed open for only us, and greated us all with an emphatic “Happy Birthday” upon entering. It was an establishment Bruce has faithfully dined at for several decades; it turned out to be one of the best meals I’ve ever had, of course.Instead of mourning the immensely difficult month we’d all experienced, Bruce showed us videos of a 90-something-year-old pianist that he’d found at a club somewhere and was excited to book shows with—he ended up being one of the many on stage at Hampton 70. There was more excitement than sadness in Bruce’s voice, something that confused me at the time. It’s more obvious to me now that he was the kind of spirit that lived just a few steps ahead of the present, and that inspired me to do the same. After all, losing is gaining, right?Related: Stranger Than Fiction: The Cosmic Curtain Call Of Col. Bruce HamptonLast week in New Orleans, a group of musicians came together to celebrate the lives of Butch Trucks and Col. Bruce Hampton for a show at One Eyed Jacks. Warren Haynes and Jeff Sipe unexpectedly joined Duane Trucks, Oteil Burbridge, Eric Krasno, Danny Louis, Scott Metzger, and several others as the Daze Between Band to honor the two influencers, and quite frankly, to play through the emotions of their loss.In going through the stages of grief with Butch, the death of Col. Bruce Hampton cemented and suspended a feeling of reality. As difficult a thought it is to grasp, losing these two mentors has been a perspective-shifting experience for many. I frequently find myself searching for truth within the same dimensions of heartache, but have found solace in music and the celebration of life. This seems to be a communal sentiment, as the energy from the room catapulted into a marvelous gesture to the sky.While “legends” in their own realm, Butch Trucks and Col. Bruce Hampton were staple spirits to the community. They provided much more than music and are two of the few exceptions in rock and roll to ever willingly do so. Everyone who has had the delight of their personal influence will say the same.Happy Birthday, Butch, the world misses you so, so much.[photos by Michael Bloom Photography]last_img read more