Rodents on the run from derelict sites

first_imgNewsLocal NewsRodents on the run from derelict sitesBy admin – March 1, 2011 939 Advertisement THE sight of rodents scurrying past long-standing derelict sites is terrifying people, according to election candidate Cllr Joe Leddin, responding to a complaint from a young Limerick woman who had such an experience on the Ballinacurra road. It is claimed that rats and rodents are terrifying people, especially our senior citizens who walk in the area of the former Moloney Garage site.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up This week, the Limerick Post received a call from a young woman who said she is now terrified to be anywhere near the site.“I was wheeling my child in her buggy and two rats ran across my path – it was obvious they were coming from the site, which attracts lots of illegal dumping – it’s a disgrace that this is being allowed fester so close to where people are living and walking”.Cllr Joe Leddin, who has requested an immediate inspection of a number of the city’s most offensive derelict sites and properties from City Hall’s Planning Department, said that on his election canvass throughout the city he has received numerous complaints from people and the business sector who are living close to derelict sites.“They have outlined to me their concerns with the continued deterioration of these sites. All kind of rubbish is being dumped illegally, and as a result, increases anti-social behaviour.“There are also serious health and safety concerns surrounding the proposed Opera Centre – many of the buildings involved are over 100 years and in a poor physical state”.Pointing out that the issue is of a more serious nature than many people perceive, he also referred to the many unoccupied derelict houses and sites scattered in Hyde Road, Quins Cottages, Janesboro and Prospect, that are causing huge concern for locals.“Urgent action, such as compulsory purchase orders by the city council are now required, and while there may be difficulties pertaining to title deeds with certain houses, the major strategic sites on main artery roads into the city can’t be left unattended – either the owners or the city council must carry out appropriate works to clean and secure these sites”. Print Linkedin Facebookcenter_img WhatsApp Previous articleOutlaw Concy hot on trail of RubberbanditsNext articleRugby fans to benefit from ticket price reduction admin Twitter Emaillast_img read more

‘Baseload’ renewables coming to Australia

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:Australia is currently experiencing an unprecedented boom in solar and wind energy investments, both in terms of capacity and dollars. It will likely take the country to a 33 percent share of renewables as early as 2020.But there is another fascinating development taking place–as more and more wind and solar is added to the grid, the shape of their output is also changing, and in a way that should give confidence about a clean energy future based around a high level of variable renewable energy sources.Two significant trends that are emerging: the first is the offering of “firming contracts” to those looking to source a significant amount of their supply from wind and solar, but wary of wholesale price risks when the sun don’t shine and the wind don’t blow. The second is the development of projects that do much the same thing but this time by the physical combination of wind, solar and some form of storage at the one site, or nearby. Proposals and projects are now emerging across the country.One of the first “solar firming” products came from TFS Green, who helped put together a package for ERM Power that takes the risk out of contracting with a solar farm. This is a product that simply seeks to manage the risk from variable solar output by providing price swaps. It allows a solar plant to provide a customer with a firm price for a flat load.Roger Price, the CEO of Windlab, also talks of fully dispatchable renewables–or, to borrow the parlance of the coal lobby, “baseload renewables”, with the Kennedy Energy Park inland from Townsville. The first stage of this project is being built now, combining 43 MW of wind, 15 MW of solar, and 4 MWh of Tesla battery storage. “It’s the perfect match,” Price says. “You get solar in middle of the day, the wind resource picks up as the sun starts to set, blows through night, then drops after the solar” emerges for the morning peak.And, of course, there is the Kidston project in North Queensland, not far from Kennedy, where Genex Power is looking to combine 270 MW solar and 250 MW of pumped hydro, with maybe 6-8 hours storage, and then add 150 MW wind power for good measure.More: The changing shape of wind and solar in Australia’s grid ‘Baseload’ renewables coming to Australialast_img read more