Alums recall effects of proposed merger in ’71

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the first in a five-day series discussing the role of women at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s, in honor of the 40th anniversary of coeducation at the University this year. As Notre Dame celebrates 40 years of coeducation, Saint Mary’s alumnae still remember a time when the two schools considered merging to create one Catholic college for both men and women under the Holy Cross order. While the merger fell apart in 1971, College archivist John Kovach said he believes the merger was a good idea at first. “At the time I definitely think it made sense to merge,” Kovach said. “In theory, however, the colleges quickly found out that no one wanted to lose and in situations such as this, one college was going to lose. “When looking at this era of the merger there were over 300 women’s colleges, that number has increasingly gone down. Today, it is a very unique choice to come to a women’s college.” A spring 1983 issue of The Courier, Saint Mary’s alumnae magazine, offered a timeline of the events leading up to the failed merger. Beginning in September 1965, the universities introduced a new co-exchange program through which students could take courses at either college, the timeline stated. This program marked a new beginning for the long-standing relationship of the two campuses since crossover classes for students on the neighboring campuses had not been an opportunity before. By May of 1969, Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame agreed to expand the co-exchange program. The colleges modified the freshman liberal arts curriculum to be consistent across campuses, introduced integrated dining options and seating at athletic events and synced academic calendars. While these measures hinted at a potential merger, both University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh and President Emeritus Monsignor John McGrath, presidents of the respective colleges at the time, issued a joint statement denying any rumors of a merger at the time. Senior Jessica Lopez, who studied the non-merger for over a year for her senior comprehensive project, said she believes the colleges considered the merger primarily for the benefit of Notre Dame students’ gender relations. “I found that it seemed what Notre Dame was interested in was what all-male colleges used in order to combine with a sister school,” Lopez said. “They would say they wanted to use the merger to act as a civilizing influence to prepare for real world interactions with women. Saint Mary’s would have given those benefits to Notre Dame.” In her findings, Lopez saw a diversity of opinions among students and faculty at the time. “There were some strong sentiments from students and some faculty,” Lopez said. “Some didn’t consider it a good option for Saint Mary’s. Even at Notre Dame people were against the merger. Fr. James Burtchaell, provost at Notre Dame during that time, asserted that Notre Dame did not need to merge with Saint Mary’s, but rather the College needed to merge with Notre Dame to survive.” According to the timeline, in May of 1971, the Boards of Trustees at both institutions formally approved plans to seek unification. According to a statement from that time, “the ultimate goal of this unification is a single institution with one student body of men and women, one faculty, one president and administration and one board of trustees.” The statement noted the preservation of Saint Mary’s identity would be by the matriculation of all women undergraduates of the University through Saint Mary’s as the college of record. It also recognized the importance of financial viability of any plan to merge the two institutions. According to a statement from the Board of Trustees from Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s, the ultimate goal of this unification was to form a single institution with one student body of men and women, one faculty, one president and administration and one Board of Trustees. “Unification of all academic departments of ND and SMC should be accomplished by the start of 1972-73,” the statement said. “The academic year 1974-75 is the target date for the completion of unification, but it is hoped that it might be accomplished even before that time.” However, by November of 1971, Mother Olivette Whalen and Edmund Stephan, chairpersons of the Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame Board of Trustees, respectively, issued a joint statement announcing the two institutions would “indefinitely suspend unification negotiation,” because organizers were “unable to solve financial and administrative problems.” Reconciling the financial differences between the two school’s budgets and pay to their employees, as well as the logistics in combining all the schools’ academic programs without losing any employees, became too difficult. Soon after, Notre Dame announced plans to begin accepting women directly. “Things started falling through,” Lopez said. “By December, all negotiations broke down. The administrations sent a letter to female applicants saying they could apply to both Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s or one or the other. There was another attempt to reopen negotiations the next year but nothing happened.” While a second attempt at a merger would be made the following year, Kovach said nothing materialized. “I think for something that is so important to the history of Saint Mary’s, I am surprised that so many decades later there still seems to be this aura of silence around the subject,” Kovach said. “The non-merger, I think, is the most important part of our college. We wouldn’t be here today, at least in this setting. We really bucked a trend and have proved successful. This success, I think is due to the leadership at the college. A merger wouldn’t have been an equal setting at all.” “There was a slow movement and sad decline in interest,” Lopez said. “Overall, there was no climactic point to the merger becoming a non-merger, the outcome just slopes downward.” Many students of the Class of 1975 accepted the offer to come to Saint Mary’s under the assumption the College would be merging with Notre Dame their freshman year, however. This caused for mixed feelings among the student body. “Mostly I remember the anger, disappointment and frustration when the merger didn’t go through,” Mary Meruisse Richardson, a 1975 alumna, said. “I remember the song, ‘There’s a Riot Going On’ wafting out from dorm windows.  I felt betrayed because I had accepted to come expecting the merger to go through and then it didn’t. When the merger fell apart, many of my friends transferred to ND. It split up our class and that was hard.” Mary-Margaret Anthonie Ney, also a 1975 alumna, said emotions ran high after the non-merger went public. “In some old editions of The Observer they covered many protests. We even made national news,” Ney said. “When it first happened, there was lot of resentment. … We never really heard a good explanation for why it was called off. It settled down after a while, though, and people made decisions. I chose to stay at Saint Mary’s as [a] Spanish major, which worked out really well for me. My roommate transferred to Notre Dame because her major found a better fit there.” Class of 1975 alumna Jeanne Murabito said at first she had mixed feelings about the merger cancellation, but later decided she was pleased with the outcome. “I knew I could take classes at Notre Dame and be a part of that social life,” Murabito said. “I chose not to transfer after my freshman year although some of my friends did. At first I was upset about it, but now I realize I had the best of both worlds. I was a humanistic studies major and I couldn’t get that anywhere else. The professors’ personal commitment to the College was extraordinary. I do not regret my decision to stay at the College.” Amy Dardinger, assistant director of reunion giving, said many alumna from the Class of 1975 are overcoming the emotions of the non-merger and are giving back to the College more. “Many of them have come to the point that they appreciate that Saint Mary’s is still here,” she said. Because many women’s colleges merged with brother institutions at this time, most alumnae of these institutions find themselves returning to a fundamentally different college. “Now I think many alums return to the College and think ‘How lucky are we that we are able to return to a single-sex institution?’” Kovach said. “So many women’s colleges at this time merged with partner institutions and I think Saint Mary’s is very lucky to have not merged. I think that time has made some folks open their eyes to what the consequences of the merger really could have been. This really shaped the identity of the College.” Many alumnae of the college and that Class of 1975 said they are thankful Saint Mary’s remained independent. “It worked out very well for me,” Ney said. “I love Saint Mary’s, it’s a great place and I felt like I grew up there and became my own person. I am still very proud of Saint Mary’s.” Contact Jillian Barwick at [email protected] and Kaitlyn Rabach at [email protected]last_img read more

Cricket News Jasprit Bumrah Will Be Indebted To Virat Kohli For The Hat-Trick: Harbhajan Singh

first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. Harbhajan Singh was the first Indian bowler to take a Test hat-trick.Jasprit Bumrah got the wickets of Darren Bravo, Shamarh Brooks and Roston Chase.Hanuma Vihari scored his maiden century. New Delhi: Jasprit Bumrah created history on Saturday when he became the third Indian bowler after Harbhajan Singh and Irfan Pathan to take a hat-trick in Tests. Habrhajan had become the first Indian when he achieved the feat against Australia in Eden Gardens in 2001 while Irfan took the hat-trick in the first over of the Karachi Test against Pakistan in 2006. However, Bumrah almost did not get the hat-trick in Jamaica and it needed Virat Kohli’s help to achieve the feat. After getting rid of Darren Bravo and Shamarh Brooks, Bumrah rapped the pads of Roston Chase with a sharp inswinger and India appealed for an LBW. However, the umpire did not give it out and Virat Kohli took a review. Replays showed the ball was hitting leg stump and Bumrah had gotten the hat-trick.Speaking about Bumrah’s feat, Harbhajan Singh, who took the first hat-trick has said Bumrah will be indebted to Kohli in the same way like he was to Sadagoppan Ramesh during the Kolkata Test. Harbhajan trapped Ricky Ponting and Adam Gilchrist LBW and he got the hat-trick when Shane Warne flicked a quicker ball to short leg and Ramesh took the catch.”This hat-trick belongs to Virat as much as it belongs to Bumrah. The bowler wasn’t convinced but the skipper had a gut feeling. What if Virat wouldn’t have gone for that DRS? It was a brilliant call by the skipper which complemented his magnificent effort,” Harbhajan said.The offspinner, who has taken over 400 wickets in Tests, opened up about the hat-trick. Also Read | England series gave me confidence to bowl outswingers: Jasprit Bumrah”I remember that I discussed with Dada (Sourav Ganguly) and we decided to keep it on stumps and try for a third leg before but Warne flicked it. Now to be honest, Ramesh wasn’t the most athletic of the guys in that team. Yet at forward short-leg, he pulled off that stunner with a less than split second reaction time. Whenever I have later met Ramesh, I told him, ‘buddy my hat-trick belongs to you’. That’s why I believe that some things happen that come together and such a beautiful thing happens. It was Ramesh’s brilliance then and it’s Virat’s conviction now. I have never seen Rahul so excited, jumping with joy. Perhaps, he also didn’t believe Ramesh can pull off such a catch,” Harbhajan said.Also Read | Jasprit Bumrah becomes second-fastest Indian to 100 ODI wickets in World Cup clash vs Sri LankaHarbhajan, who has not played a Test for India since 2013, has said Bumrah’s exploits make him a blessing for the Indian cricket team. “Indian cricket is blessed to have a match winner like Bumrah. This hat-trick will only help his legend grow but even without that he is an incredible performer. I mean 5 wickets in 7 overs in last game and 6 wickets in 9 overs in this game. You can’t ask for more. He is a rare diamond. Look at Bumrah’s deliveries. The length and how it was tailing in. That’s pure skills,” Harbhajan said.center_img highlightslast_img read more

Irabor Calls for Urgent Reorganisation of Nigeria Sports

first_imgPioneer Chairman of the League Management Company (LMC) and one-time Chairman of the Federal House of Representatives Committee on Communications, Hon Nduka Irabor, has called for urgent action for the revival of Nigeria sports.Speaking on the topic “Nigeria Sports: Strategies for Revival and Growth”, at a seminar organised by the Lagos chapter of the Sports Writers Association Nigeria (SWAN) as part of activities to mark their Merrybet-Lagos SWAN Week, Irabor outlined a number of measures that should be taken to stem the ugly tide and build capacity to enable the realisation of the full capacity of the sports sector. He also decried the prevailing situation where the Nigeria business community has developed a penchant for association and sponsorship of foreign sports bodies to the negligence of such bodies in the country.Irabor pointed out that while all the football leagues in Nigeria received only $10m in sponsorship in one year, the Nigeria corporate community paid out about N150billion to foreign football leagues and clubs, an attitude which he stressed seriously injures and negates efforts at nation building.Principal among the solutions proffered by Hon Irabor is that the government should properly re-articulate its policy for sports, taking into consideration the fact that sports has become a serious global economic and business factor.Also, the former lawmaker said the government should as a matter of imperative develop new creative ways for the funding of sports.He called for the involvement of businesses, communities, the public and individuals to contribute in tackling the critical deficit in sports facilities, equipment and trainers nationwide.While pointing out that the sports trust and lottery system has been developed and applied for the funding of both grassroots and elite sports in countries like the United Kingdom and Australia, he regretted that the Nigeria version of the same set up has remained only so in name. He insisted that Nigerians do not know how much is raked in and where and how the income is applied.Irabor also advised that the nation’s sports governing establishment should be re-invented to give way for competent professionals in various sports administration, management and technical disciplines to be engaged in the implementation of planned programmes as against the present civil service driven system which is further worsened by constantly changing political appointees.He advised that no investment is too much in sports considering its social, economic and health benefits, noting that it behooves the government and people to realise their faults and seek to make amends in policies, institutions and practices if they are truly desirous of achieving global competitiveness in the sector.The two discussants at the seminar, Dr Kweku Tandoh, former Director of Sport at the Lagos State Sports Council and current Chairman of the Nigeria Sports Award Panel, and Mr Mitchel Obi, President of AIPS Africa, strengthened Irabor’s position.Obi warned that the Nigeria sports was now in a ‘crisis situation’ while Tandoh called out for the ‘political will’ for action.The seminar which held on Wednesday, August 16, at the Lagos SWAN Secretariat, National Stadium, Lagos was chaired by the Secretary General of the Nigeria Olympic Committee, Mr Tunde Popoola, with the Lagos Liaison Officer of the Federal Ministry of Sports, Dr Segun Akinlotan, and Nigeria’s first and only individual Olympic gold medalist, Chioma Ajunwa present at the event.Chairman of the Nigeria Women Football League, Aisha Falode, Director of Sports Development at the Lagos State Sports Commission, Mr Moses Kolawole, and representatives of Merrybet, sponsors of the Lagos SWAN Week, were also in attendance.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

NFL Hall of Fame Game 2019: Three takeaways from Broncos’ win over Falcons

first_img Broncos’ Vic Fangio will coach Hall of Fame Game after treatment for kidney stone Football is back — kind of.The Hall of Fame game kicked off the NFL season Thursday and it was what you would expect. There were a lot of penalties and some poorly thrown balls and blown coverages. That concentration though‼️We 👀 you, @OnlyOne_JW! 👊#PFHOF19 | #DENvsATL pic.twitter.com/24wxnYzNT5— Denver Broncos (@Broncos) August 2, 2019That was the difference in Denver’s 14-10 win.Three takeaways from the NFL Hall of Fame GameNoah Fant has up-and-down gameNoah Fant looked like a rookie in his debut with the Broncos on Thursday and that’s by no means an insult.He flashed his quick feet and blocking skills, but he also dropped a pass and was called for [email protected] first-round pick Noah Fant with his first catch of the preseason! @nrfant📺: @ProFootballHOF Game on NBCWatch on mobile: https://t.co/gjdN954aVr pic.twitter.com/lpMpIKjWzN— NFL (@NFL) August 2, 2019The Broncos knew they were going to have to take the good with the bad when they selected Fant in the first round this year and they got a lot of both in his limited time Thursday.But, he showed he can do just what they got him to do and also helped lead the way on a rushing touchdown in the first half. Moments like that are a cherry on top at this moment for Denver. He has a chance to be a very good player.Drew Lock played; Kurt Benkert impressedProbably the most fun thing about NFL preseason games is getting to see rookies try their hand at the next level. Thursday, there was a good amount of anticipation to see the debut of Drew Lock, who was supposed to be a first-round pick but fell to the Broncos in the second.But, while many were looking forward to seeing Lock, it would be hard not to be excited by another quarterback — Falcons second-year man Kurt Benkert. Lock was fine in the game. He finished 7-of-11 passing for 34 yards, but Benkert showed off a wide assortment of skills and ran the offense like a player who has been running it for a couple of years — which he has, as he spent last season on Atlanta’s practice squad.Benkert was crisp with his passes and even broke off a 17-yard run in the first half. He was impressive no matter how you look at it, finishing 19-of-34 passing for 185 yards and a touchdown. Unfortunately, he had to leave the game in the fourth quarter with a toe injury, putting a damper on a good game.Easy money.QB @KurtBenkert ➡️ RB @Heezy2Liv5 pic.twitter.com/gPPW6zbtWo— Atlanta Falcons (@AtlantaFalcons) August 2, 2019As for Lock, he looked like a rookie playing in a Hall of Fame Game. There’s nothing wrong with that. He just didn’t look comfortable, yet, but he has time to get there. But there were some good and intriguing things, as well.There was even a late touchdown catch of the spectacular variety by Broncos rookie Juwann Winfree. Related News New pass interference review works as it shouldLike last year, when NFL fans were waiting to see how the “lowering the helmet rule” would play out in a game, this season everyone wanted to know how the pass interference review would go. The league is allowing such plays to be reviewed this season on a one-year trial basis.The answer — pretty well. Broncos coach Vic Fangio challenged a pass interference call in the first half Thursday and the play was upheld as it should have been. It’s an easy adjustment to make and it sure worked well in this game.The first challenge of a pass interference call.Hear the explanation behind the call. pic.twitter.com/CPKoUDLE1u— SNF on NBC (@SNFonNBC) August 2, 2019last_img read more

Stephen F. Austin’s ‘biggest’ win over Duke sends clear signal to college hoops critics: November matters, too

first_imgIf this were another low-major program that had gone into Cameron Indoor Stadium and won, that statement would have been indisputable. But SFA has reached the NCAA Tournament five times in the past 10 years, and each of those appearances required a Southland Conference tournament final victory to assure the Lumberjacks of a bid.And they advanced in two of those years: They beat No. 5 seed VCU in overtime, 77-75, in 2014. Two years later, they throttled No. 3 seed West Virginia, 70-56, and advanced to a second-round game against Notre Dame they should have won to reach the Sweet 16.MORE: Stephen F. Austin hero’s family severely impacted by Hurricane DorianSo, was beating top-ranked Duke at Cameron Indoor Stadium — becoming the first non-conference opponent to win in that building since St. John’s did it in February 2000 — bigger than all of that?A Twitter poll I posted this morning indicated the public believes Collins was correct, that defeating Duke at Cameron was the biggest moment for SFA basketball. The margin was decisive, too: 65 percent for Duke, 35 percent for the West Virginia win in the 2016 NCAAs.Jason McIntyre of Fox Sports tweeted in favor of Tuesday night’s result: “Nobody like SFA has gone into Cameron and won in decades.”He has an excellent point there. St. John’s finished third in the Big East that year and ranked No. 9 in the AP poll. The Red Storm earned a No. 2 seed in the NCAA Tournament. To find a result similar to this for the Blue Devils, a home loss to a team from well outside the major conferences, one must travel all the way back to 1982-83, when they fell at Cameron to Wagner, 84-77. That Duke team was not ranked No. 1. That Duke team finished 11-17 — the last losing team Mike Krzyzewski coached from start to finish.Lots have beat Duke in March. Nobody like SFA has gone into Cameron and won in decades— Jason McIntyre (@jasonrmcintyre) November 27, 2019Adam Gold, who does the “Adam & Joe” afternoon drive program in the Raleigh/Durham region with co-host Joe Ovies, also voted for the SFA win at Cameron because “NCAA upsets happen all the time.”Last night because of the setting. NCAA upsets happen all the time. 14 over 3 uncommon, but not earth shattering. Winning AT CAMERON, and being as good as they were in the second half? Awesome.— Adam Gold (@AGoldFan) November 27, 2019“In almost every other circumstance, I would vote for the NCAA Tournament,” tweeted Derek Schultz of Indianapolis sports radio program “Query and Schultz.” But he opted for Tuesday night’s win because the Devils were No. 1 and owners of such a long home winning streak against non-league opponents. “Man, that’s about as historic as it gets for a regular season win.”In almost any other circumstance, I would vote for the NCAA Tournament victory.However, beating Duke who a) is #1; b) at Cameron; and c) to end a 150-game non-conference home win streak? Man… that’s about as historic as it gets for a regular season win.— Derek Schultz (@Schultz975) November 27, 2019We wrote two weeks ago, after Evansville’s historic upset win over No. 1 Kentucky at Rupp Arena, that the number of early entrants departing college basketball and the relatively meager national freshman class would have led to fewer truly elite teams in college hoops this season.Fewer meaning, well, none. But even those factors didn’t portend the kinds of results we are seeing for the top teams in the polls.The reaction to the Duke and Kentucky defeats could be considered an excellent development for college basketball in 2019-20, and not just for the legions of Devils and Cats haters. That so many would consider a November result to be monumental gives lie to the common refrain that NCAA basketball is a one-month sport.March is huge for the game, no doubt, but if this many people are paying attention before Thanksgiving, that cannot be a bad thing. Stephen F. Austin’s Nathan Bain let go of the layup that defeated No. 1 Duke with 0.2 seconds remaining in Tuesday night’s game.As the ball settled into the net, Fox Sports announcer Eric Collins shouted, “The Lumberjacks have done it!” Then he waited just a second or two longer before declaring, “This is going to be the biggest win in program history!”last_img read more

Arts Walk XLVI In Downtown Olympia April 26 & 27

first_imgSubmitted by the City of OlympiaRegional Festival Celebrates the Arts!Explore the creative and spirited arts community of Olympia as Arts Walk XLVI takes to the streets of the City’s historic downtown.  Tucked into a valley at the foot of South Puget Sound, Olympia is the state’s Capital, and also home to a vibrant mix of musicians, filmmakers, writers and visual and performing artists.  Arts Walk is the largest festival of this type in the region – an unparalleled opportunity to embrace the arts and meet the artists!  Dates for the event are Friday, April 26 from 5-10pm and Saturday, April 27 from 12-8pm.As day reaches into night, Arts Walk brings together over 120 businesses, and hundreds of visual and performing artists with over 30,000 visitors as they welcome the arts in all forms during this twice-yearly event.Literary and performing arts share the limelight with paintings and sculpture:Meet artists from all career levels: pre-school through professional~Listen to a variety of live music including jazz, classical, folk acoustic, bluegrass, blues and Rock & Roll~Learn the Charleston, tour the Hands on Children’s Museum art collection, or try a new instrument~Check out human powered kinetic sculpture, the electric vehicle competition and demos from encaustic painting to martial arts~Take in impromptu street performances, crafts markets and of course, exhibition of fine art from photography, painting and drawing to sculpture, textiles, ceramics, printmaking and more!The festival also includes the spectacular Procession of the Species, an artistic and environmental celebration presented by Earthbound Productions, www.procession.org  The event is a colorful and joyous street pageant using the languages of art, music and dance to inspire cultural appreciation, understanding, and protection of the natural world;  the Procession begins at 4:30pm on Saturday.  Due to the popularity of the Procession, it is extremely important for individuals to pay close attention to street closures and  tow away zones.Peaceful City, by artist China Star, adorns the cover of the Arts Walk map this spring, constructed of low-relief mixed media illustration.  China’s studio work documents, through portraiture and repetition, a record of interactive vibrations between the 2nd and 3rd dimensions.  As an interdisciplinary artist, China has produced artwork in various mediums, elemental and synthesized, for the last 20 years.   Her Painted in the Language of Maps series, from which the 2013 Spring Cover Art is derived, documents her personal relationship with the physical and technological environments within which she lives and loves.  China’s cover art can be seen during Arts Walk at The Steam Plant (#12 on the Arts Walk map), and she’ll also show an installation of sculpted nests at the Yoga Loft (#100).Arts Walk is sponsored by the City of Olympia Parks, Arts & Recreation Department and Olympia Arts Commission, with support provided by Art House Designs, Capitol City Press, Heritage Bank and MIXX 96fm.  Arts Walk maps are available at participating locations after April 13, and at Olympia City Hall, 601 4th Ave. East and The Olympia Center, 222 Columbia St. NW.  An electronic Arts Walk guide is also available at www.olympiawa.gov/artswalkmobile For more information, contact Olympia Parks, Arts & Recreation at 360.753.8380. Facebook37Tweet0Pin0last_img read more