Widespread Panic Shares Pro-Shot “Soul Kitchen” & “Paranoid” Bust Outs From Halloween Show [Watch]

first_imgBeloved jam band Widespread Panic settled into the 1STBANK Arena in Broomfield, CO for a three-night Halloween celebration, treating fans to an “Angels & Devils” themed show throughout two sets of music. The band took the opportunity to bust out several long-lost covers from years past, including a great two song run for their first encore.The band dug deep into past Halloween shows and pulled out The Doors’ “Soul Kitchen” and Black Sabbath’s “Paranoid,” playing the songs for the first time since 2000 and 1987, respectively. Fortunately for us, WSP has shared pro-shot footage of the two songs, which you can watch below.Panic is off the road until a three-night run in Nashville, TN for New Year’s Eve. Though the band has promised to reduce touring in 2017, they have shows scheduled for Panic En La Playa and SweetWater 420 festival next year. Check out the Halloween setlist from PanicStream, below.Setlist: Widespread Panic at 1STBANK Center, Broomfield, CO – 10/30/16Set 1: Waiting For The Bus* > Jesus Just Left Chicago, Happy, Angels on High, Good People, Heaven, Angels Don’t Sing The Blues, Hallelujah, Tall Boy, Ain’t Life Grand (64 mins)Set 2: Theme Slippin’ Into Darkness**^, Machine > Barstools and Dreamers***, Vampire Blues****, Henry Parson’s Died, Beat On The Brat*****, I Wanna Be Sedated*****, Chilly Water > I Walk On Guilded Splinters > Bust It Big > Chilly Water, Lithium****** (83 mins)Encore 1: Soul Kitchen*******, Paranoid********Encore 2:  Postcard, End of the Show (21 mins)Notes: * FTP ~ 10.31.09 ~ Austin** FTP ~ 10.31.02 ~ NOLA / ^ Steve Lopez on Percussion*** w/ Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin) rap**** FTP ~ 10.31.05 ~ Las Vegas***** FTP ~ 10.31.03 ~ NYC / The Ramones (LTP 880 shows)****** FTP ~ 10.30.16 ~ Broomfield / Nirvana******* FTP ~ 10.28.00 ~ NOLA / The Doors (LTP 1,140 shows)******** FTP ~ 10.31.87 ~ Athens, Ga / Black Sabbath (LTP 2,809 shows)last_img read more

Honduras: Military Medical Brigades Improve the Health of Citizens

first_img“The medical care has covered both dental and medical specialties, and we have also offered care in psychology, psychiatry, dermatology, cardiology, gastroenterology, internal medicine, orthopedics, among others. In Tegucigalpa alone, we have provided free care to more than 45,000 people.” Organizations that participate in the clinics are providing a valuable service to Honduras, according to Dr. Héctor Galindo Castellanos. The Honduran Armed Forces concluded November 22 a series of clinics held throughout the year to provide medical care to the country’s poorest citizens. In addition to general medical care, the clinics have treated chronic, acute and emerging diseases, according to Lieutenant Colonel of Military Health Dr. Lisandro Valle. By Dialogo November 27, 2014 That’s where the brigades were inaugurated in February during an event attended by the President of the Republic and Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces, Juan Orlando Hernández. “It is a very important civic engagement for the country because part of having a better life is to prevent disease, prevent violence, and what we want is to have a healthy life,” he said, affirming the government’s support of the Armed Forces and Ministry of Security, who provided the clinics. Hernández also took the opportunity to encourage the public to actively participate in combating diseases that can be avoided with prevention – especially deaths caused by hemorrhagic and classic dengue, which can be fought by keeping clean homes and yards that can become breeding grounds for mosquitos. “It is a very important civic engagement for the country because part of having a better life is to prevent disease, prevent violence, and what we want is to have a healthy life,” he said, affirming the government’s support of the Armed Forces and Ministry of Security, who provided the clinics. Hernández also took the opportunity to encourage the public to actively participate in combating diseases that can be avoided with prevention – especially deaths caused by hemorrhagic and classic dengue, which can be fought by keeping clean homes and yards that can become breeding grounds for mosquitos. “The brigades were set up throughout the country in locations with an air unit, naval unit or combat unit, and particularly in the communities of Choluteca, Danlí, Juticalpa, Catacamas, Santa Rosa de Copán, Santa Bárbara, San Pedro Sula, Tela, La Ceiba, El Progreso, La Esperanza, Comayagua, Siguatepeque and Tegucigalpa,” Valle said. “This is the fourth time I’ve come to receive medical care this year because my health has improved a lot. Also, the doctors give me medicine and I can bring clothes from here to my family. For someone who is poor, this is very important,” said Julio Segovia, 83, who attended a November 16 clinic held in Tegucigalpa. In addition to medical care and medicine, participants also received assistance from stylists, who offered hairdressing services for men, women and children. The military also provided children’s games, music ensembles and clothing donations. At the Tegucigalpa Brigade alone, the military provided 4,200 medical consultations. For the 1,736 children in attendance, they set up bouncy castles and 13 piñatas, held 16 toy raffles, and launched 20 showers of confetti. In addition to general medical care, the clinics have treated chronic, acute and emerging diseases, according to Lieutenant Colonel of Military Health Dr. Lisandro Valle. Organizations that participate in the clinics are providing a valuable service to Honduras, according to Dr. Héctor Galindo Castellanos. More than 300,000 people across the country received care from the clinics in 2014, according to official estimates – and it’s expected that more than a million people will be treated over the next four years. That’s where the brigades were inaugurated in February during an event attended by the President of the Republic and Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces, Juan Orlando Hernández. In addition to medical care and medicine, participants also received assistance from stylists, who offered hairdressing services for men, women and children. The military also provided children’s games, music ensembles and clothing donations. At the Tegucigalpa Brigade alone, the military provided 4,200 medical consultations. For the 1,736 children in attendance, they set up bouncy castles and 13 piñatas, held 16 toy raffles, and launched 20 showers of confetti. “This is the fourth time I’ve come to receive medical care this year because my health has improved a lot. Also, the doctors give me medicine and I can bring clothes from here to my family. For someone who is poor, this is very important,” said Julio Segovia, 83, who attended a November 16 clinic held in Tegucigalpa. “We appreciate the assistance we have received from the Public Order and Military Police (POMP), Permanent Contingency Committee (COPECO), garment assembly factories, drugstores, Universidad Católica de Honduras (UCH), National Autonomous University of Honduras (UNAH) and Evangelical and Catholic churches,” said Lieutenant Colonel and logistics officer of the military hospital, Nahúm Canales Cruz. “We appreciate the assistance we have received from the Public Order and Military Police (POMP), Permanent Contingency Committee (COPECO), garment assembly factories, drugstores, Universidad Católica de Honduras (UCH), National Autonomous University of Honduras (UNAH) and Evangelical and Catholic churches,” said Lieutenant Colonel and logistics officer of the military hospital, Nahúm Canales Cruz. “The medical care has covered both dental and medical specialties, and we have also offered care in psychology, psychiatry, dermatology, cardiology, gastroenterology, internal medicine, orthopedics, among others. In Tegucigalpa alone, we have provided free care to more than 45,000 people.” More than 300,000 people across the country received care from the clinics in 2014, according to official estimates – and it’s expected that more than a million people will be treated over the next four years. “I invite all civil society organizations to join in the work of these health conferences because this will result in greater benefits for the people who don’t have access to health systems due to low income, being outside the coverage of the system or living in rural areas that are difficult to access.” A successful year “I invite all civil society organizations to join in the work of these health conferences because this will result in greater benefits for the people who don’t have access to health systems due to low income, being outside the coverage of the system or living in rural areas that are difficult to access.” I think they could have trained people in all the airports to not let any traveller from places that have Ebola through let them through to countries that don’t have that disease. And they let them into this country out of carelessness therefore they knew it could happen. Now we must pray a lot so that malignant disease doesn’t bring the Dominicanpopulation to an end. God is very powerful and will not abandon us let us trust God and in the trained personnel. The Honduran Armed Forces concluded November 22 a series of clinics held throughout the year to provide medical care to the country’s poorest citizens. “The brigades were set up throughout the country in locations with an air unit, naval unit or combat unit, and particularly in the communities of Choluteca, Danlí, Juticalpa, Catacamas, Santa Rosa de Copán, Santa Bárbara, San Pedro Sula, Tela, La Ceiba, El Progreso, La Esperanza, Comayagua, Siguatepeque and Tegucigalpa,” Valle said. A successful yearlast_img read more

Miami lawyers band together to help children

first_imgMiami lawyers band together to help children January 15, 2003 Regular News Miami- Dade County’s private legal sector has teamed up with Lawyers for Children America and the Voices for Children Foundation, which raises funds for the county’s guardian ad litem program.Like its founding organizations, this new effort, The South Florida Lawyers Speak for Children Campaign, commits itself to raising money for abused and neglected children, but as the chair of Voices, Norman Powell, points out:“Our goal is not just to fund-raise. . . but to raise awareness. We are working with a community that has the ability to be a voice for change, to become informed advocates and apostles for this cause.”What better advocates for the cause than the lawyers who see how the court system works, or in many cases doesn’t work. Co-chairs of the South Florida Lawyers Speak for Children campaign, Mike Eidson and Michael Hanzman, encourage skeptical attorneys to check out the juvenile justice system at work.“The courthouse is abysmal. . . the guardian ad litem attorneys are working out of trailers,” Hanzman said. “They are understaffed and underpaid.”He said praise for the region’s guardian program’s efforts is warranted, but with steep cutbacks by the state government and overcrowding in offices, many children simply get swept under the welfare rug.“We need to get private commitments to finance,” Powell said. “Otherwise, the kids get lost in the shuffle.”Hanzman and Eidson agree the magnitude of this problem may be abstract to some, but the reality inspires them to make a difference.“It’s amazing how out of touch we can get practicing law at the level we practice. . . my work doesn’t take me down to the juvenile court house,” Hanzman said. “You can’t find a situation in life where a young person has less of a chance than when they have been abandoned or neglected by their own parents. That’s just the reality of it.”Hanzman and Eidson, unwilling to sit back and watch the future of America become neglected by the same institutions set in place to safeguard them, emphasize the importance of awareness.“I knew I was asking people to go out and raise money for something that they hadn’t thought about,” Eidson said. “But all the others joined up enthusiastically. We want to make a statement. We want to make this work.”For a campaign whose slogan is “With Your Help, We Can Just Be Kids,” the question becomes “is there an acceptable excuse for not getting involved?”For more information about the South Florida Lawyers Speak for Children Campaign call Robyn Perlman at (954) 924-9921center_img Miami lawyers band together to help childrenlast_img read more