Alumnus speaks on U.S., India Relationship

first_imgNotre Dame alumnus Tim Roemer spoke Wednesday about the advances in technology that have transformed interaction and communication between the United States and India. Roemer, a Notre Dame alumnus, former U.S. Congressman [D-IN-3] and former Ambassador to India, spoke on the nature and importance of the United States’ interactions with India. The lecture, titled “Twitter, Buffett, and Darwin: India and the United States Relationship,” was the second installment of the Distinguished Lecture Series, co-sponsored by the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies and the Kellogg Institute for International Studies. As India’s economy develops and its middle class grows and becomes more and more successful, Roemer said the country is becoming one of the biggest markets in the region for innovative technology. India also is home to a large number of English speakers and maintains a good relationship with the U.S, Roemer said. The region as a whole has an emerging middle class that is bigger than the entire U.S. population, he said. To illustrate the opportunities technology provides to that middle class, Roemer showed a photograph of a woman wearing traditional dress, carrying a metal pot on her head and talking on a cell phone, which he said would have cost $15. The woman, Roemer said, along with a hundred others, was transporting dirt from a construction site. “She is a small-business owner,” Roemer said. “She’s on this phone while she’s working at this job, and she is calling, as a small-business owner who grows flowers – she on that phone is hiring two new people because she just got a text from Twitter that the price of flowers has gone down, and she can afford two new employees. … That phone is life-changing for that woman, as a business owner.” Roemer said the elevation of millions of people from poverty to the middle class has impacted hugely both business and trade. If India’s economy continues to grow – which, he said, is not guaranteed – multinational firms are going to shift their focus to Asian markets. “If you are an international business and you want to succeed in the next 30 or 40 years, are you going to keep selling in the U.S. and EU and depend on 50, 60, 70 percent of your sales there, or are you going to expand into those markets right there?” Roemer said. “That’s this middle-class migration that is absolutely essential for the U.S. to get a hold of, to understand, and to entice our manufacturing companies to create jobs here . . . there is a real incentive, given these trends, to do more and more manufacturing in the U.S. and export these products into these new middle-class markets so you can see the resurgence of American products in the U.S.” Roemer said that the development maintenance of a good relationship between the U.S. and India, especially India’s rising middle class, is crucial. He said the past three U.S. presidents have cooperated closely with India regarding national security as well as trade. The governments of both nations recently have “supported generally a health U.S.-India relationship,” he said. Despite problems like border disputes with Pakistan, inflation, and rising food prices, trade between the two countries is increasing, Roemer said. Roemer outlined three models for companies to emulate in order to take advantage of this relationship. First, he said the “Warren Buffett Model,” is best exemplified by General Electric [GE]. GE CEO Jeffery Immelt often holds board meetings in India to expose members to the country, culture, and market, he said. “Immelt has been very, very smart about teaching his company and getting some of his best leadership to go to some of these places,” Roemer said. “If you want to run the company and you haven’t had one of those tough assignments, … if you have run the company, and you’ve been president of India, of Nigeria, of Indonesia, you really are going to see where the future of GE is.” Second, Roemer said the “Winston Churchill Model,” is best exemplified by Starbucks. CEO Howard Schultz tried to enter India in 2005 but was not successful, he said. In 2010, however, Starbucks returned. But, the company made several fundamental changes, such as partnering with Indian companies and using domestic products.  “He figured it out, and that is the Churchill Model – try it, don’t ever give up, come back again and again,” Roemer said. “That’s Churchill’s great commencement speech – never ever, ever, ever, ever give up. Schultz did not, and I think he’s onto the right thing now, and I think he’s going to succeed in India. Third, the “Darwin Model,” is an “evolutionary model” best exemplified by IKEA, he said. When it entered the Chinese market, Roemer said Ikea changed almost everything about how it presented its products, from its value proposition to its promotions to where it manufactured its products. “You have a completely different model for almost every value network and category from Europe to China. IKEA is just going into India now, and it will be a hybrid of these two approaches,” Roemer said. “It will change again.” The U.S.-India relationship is positive now, Roemer said. This relationship will remain important because India is civically engaged, religiously diverse, and respects the rule of law, he said. “That potential influence in the entire region as India grows in confidence, as India grows in influence, as India grows in articulating its foreign policy and working with other countries is absolutely and potentially profound in the future,” Roemer said. “I’m betting that future presidents are going to see this, see the economic and religious and political advantage and continue to make this one of the most important relationships in the world.” Contact Emily McConville at [email protected]last_img read more

Honduras: Military Medical Brigades Improve the Health of Citizens

first_img“The medical care has covered both dental and medical specialties, and we have also offered care in psychology, psychiatry, dermatology, cardiology, gastroenterology, internal medicine, orthopedics, among others. In Tegucigalpa alone, we have provided free care to more than 45,000 people.” Organizations that participate in the clinics are providing a valuable service to Honduras, according to Dr. Héctor Galindo Castellanos. The Honduran Armed Forces concluded November 22 a series of clinics held throughout the year to provide medical care to the country’s poorest citizens. In addition to general medical care, the clinics have treated chronic, acute and emerging diseases, according to Lieutenant Colonel of Military Health Dr. Lisandro Valle. By Dialogo November 27, 2014 That’s where the brigades were inaugurated in February during an event attended by the President of the Republic and Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces, Juan Orlando Hernández. “It is a very important civic engagement for the country because part of having a better life is to prevent disease, prevent violence, and what we want is to have a healthy life,” he said, affirming the government’s support of the Armed Forces and Ministry of Security, who provided the clinics. Hernández also took the opportunity to encourage the public to actively participate in combating diseases that can be avoided with prevention – especially deaths caused by hemorrhagic and classic dengue, which can be fought by keeping clean homes and yards that can become breeding grounds for mosquitos. “It is a very important civic engagement for the country because part of having a better life is to prevent disease, prevent violence, and what we want is to have a healthy life,” he said, affirming the government’s support of the Armed Forces and Ministry of Security, who provided the clinics. Hernández also took the opportunity to encourage the public to actively participate in combating diseases that can be avoided with prevention – especially deaths caused by hemorrhagic and classic dengue, which can be fought by keeping clean homes and yards that can become breeding grounds for mosquitos. “The brigades were set up throughout the country in locations with an air unit, naval unit or combat unit, and particularly in the communities of Choluteca, Danlí, Juticalpa, Catacamas, Santa Rosa de Copán, Santa Bárbara, San Pedro Sula, Tela, La Ceiba, El Progreso, La Esperanza, Comayagua, Siguatepeque and Tegucigalpa,” Valle said. “This is the fourth time I’ve come to receive medical care this year because my health has improved a lot. Also, the doctors give me medicine and I can bring clothes from here to my family. For someone who is poor, this is very important,” said Julio Segovia, 83, who attended a November 16 clinic held in Tegucigalpa. In addition to medical care and medicine, participants also received assistance from stylists, who offered hairdressing services for men, women and children. The military also provided children’s games, music ensembles and clothing donations. At the Tegucigalpa Brigade alone, the military provided 4,200 medical consultations. For the 1,736 children in attendance, they set up bouncy castles and 13 piñatas, held 16 toy raffles, and launched 20 showers of confetti. In addition to general medical care, the clinics have treated chronic, acute and emerging diseases, according to Lieutenant Colonel of Military Health Dr. Lisandro Valle. Organizations that participate in the clinics are providing a valuable service to Honduras, according to Dr. Héctor Galindo Castellanos. More than 300,000 people across the country received care from the clinics in 2014, according to official estimates – and it’s expected that more than a million people will be treated over the next four years. That’s where the brigades were inaugurated in February during an event attended by the President of the Republic and Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces, Juan Orlando Hernández. In addition to medical care and medicine, participants also received assistance from stylists, who offered hairdressing services for men, women and children. The military also provided children’s games, music ensembles and clothing donations. At the Tegucigalpa Brigade alone, the military provided 4,200 medical consultations. For the 1,736 children in attendance, they set up bouncy castles and 13 piñatas, held 16 toy raffles, and launched 20 showers of confetti. “This is the fourth time I’ve come to receive medical care this year because my health has improved a lot. Also, the doctors give me medicine and I can bring clothes from here to my family. For someone who is poor, this is very important,” said Julio Segovia, 83, who attended a November 16 clinic held in Tegucigalpa. “We appreciate the assistance we have received from the Public Order and Military Police (POMP), Permanent Contingency Committee (COPECO), garment assembly factories, drugstores, Universidad Católica de Honduras (UCH), National Autonomous University of Honduras (UNAH) and Evangelical and Catholic churches,” said Lieutenant Colonel and logistics officer of the military hospital, Nahúm Canales Cruz. “We appreciate the assistance we have received from the Public Order and Military Police (POMP), Permanent Contingency Committee (COPECO), garment assembly factories, drugstores, Universidad Católica de Honduras (UCH), National Autonomous University of Honduras (UNAH) and Evangelical and Catholic churches,” said Lieutenant Colonel and logistics officer of the military hospital, Nahúm Canales Cruz. “The medical care has covered both dental and medical specialties, and we have also offered care in psychology, psychiatry, dermatology, cardiology, gastroenterology, internal medicine, orthopedics, among others. In Tegucigalpa alone, we have provided free care to more than 45,000 people.” More than 300,000 people across the country received care from the clinics in 2014, according to official estimates – and it’s expected that more than a million people will be treated over the next four years. “I invite all civil society organizations to join in the work of these health conferences because this will result in greater benefits for the people who don’t have access to health systems due to low income, being outside the coverage of the system or living in rural areas that are difficult to access.” A successful year “I invite all civil society organizations to join in the work of these health conferences because this will result in greater benefits for the people who don’t have access to health systems due to low income, being outside the coverage of the system or living in rural areas that are difficult to access.” I think they could have trained people in all the airports to not let any traveller from places that have Ebola through let them through to countries that don’t have that disease. And they let them into this country out of carelessness therefore they knew it could happen. Now we must pray a lot so that malignant disease doesn’t bring the Dominicanpopulation to an end. God is very powerful and will not abandon us let us trust God and in the trained personnel. The Honduran Armed Forces concluded November 22 a series of clinics held throughout the year to provide medical care to the country’s poorest citizens. “The brigades were set up throughout the country in locations with an air unit, naval unit or combat unit, and particularly in the communities of Choluteca, Danlí, Juticalpa, Catacamas, Santa Rosa de Copán, Santa Bárbara, San Pedro Sula, Tela, La Ceiba, El Progreso, La Esperanza, Comayagua, Siguatepeque and Tegucigalpa,” Valle said. A successful yearlast_img read more

One injured in Sunday afternoon accident

first_imgFRANKLIN COUNTY, Ind. — One person was injured in a two-vehicle accident on Sunday around 12:15 PM in Franklin County.According to the Franklin County Sheriff’s Department, a car being driven by Rhonda S. Moorehous was traveling east on US 52, when the car went left of center, continuing off the north side of the roadway up an embankment.The vehicle then came back into the westbound lane and struck a car being driven by Mildred H. Simmermeyer.Police say Moorehous thought she went unconscious into a seizure.Simmermeyer saw the vehicle coming across the center line but did not have time to react before being struck.Moorehous was transported to the Pac Center in Harrison, Ohio with back and shoulder pain.Police say alcohol and drugs are not a factor in the accident.last_img

Deery Series makes 50th visit to 34 Raceway

first_imgWEST BURLINGTON, Iowa – 34 Raceway celebrates the Big 5-0, then gets an early start at celebrating Independence Day next Tuesday.The Deery Brothers Summer Series makes its 50th visit to West Burlington on July 3. Touring IMCA Late Models chase a top check of $2,000 with a minimum of $300 paid to start the main event.34 Raceway was the site of the first-ever IMCA Late Model tour event, won by hometown driver Jay Johnson on April 11, 1987. The series has since traveled to West Burlington more often than any other track in its 31-plus years, with the single event record of 71 entries set there in 2006.Thirty-one different drivers have won Deery features at 34, the most recent of them Nick Marolf of Mos­cow on opening night of the 2017 series.“It’s an important milestone coming up on Tuesday, for IMCA and the Deery Series as well as 34 Raceway,” noted Tour Director Kevin Yoder. “34 was a fixture on the series schedule for so many years. It’s is always great to go back to the track where the Deery Series got its start.”IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars are also on the program, running for IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National, EQ Cylinder Heads Northern Region and Iowa State points.Pit gates open at 3 p.m. and the grandstand opens at 5 p.m. Hot laps are at 6:30 p.m. with racing to follow. Spectator admission is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors and students, and free for kids 10 and under when accompanying a paid adult.Pit passes are $35 and fireworks follow the evening’s race program.All law enforcement officers get in free (with ID) on Law Enforcement Night. The midweek show is also a fundraiser for COPS (Concerns of Police Survivors).More information is available by calling 319 752-3434 and at the www.34raceway.com website.Point leader Justin Kay of Wheatland equaled the series record of four straight main event victo­ries by winning the 2017 finale and the first three events this season. Winners since then have been Curt Martin of Independence, Andy Eckrich of Oxford and, last night at Benton County Speed­way, Jeremiah Hurst of Dubuque.This is the 27th season the series has enjoyed title sponsorship by the Deery Brothers Automotive Group.Deery Brothers Summer Series top 20 point standings – 1. Justin Kay, Wheatland, 247; 2. Jeremiah Hurst, Dubuque, 219; 3. Ryan Dolan, Lisbon, 217; 4. Curt Martin, Independence, 208; 5. Todd Cooney, Pleasant Hill, 203; 6. Joe Zrostlik, Long Grove, 197; 7. Nick Marolf, Moscow, 188; 8. Chad Holladay, Muscatine, 186; 9. Cayden Carter, Oskaloosa, Iowa, 154; 10. Andy Eckrich, Oxford, 150; 11. Tim Simpson, Iowa City, 141; 12. Rob Moss, Iowa City, 140; 13. Darrel DeFrance, Marshalltown, 139; 14. Matt Ryan, Davenport, 138; 15. Chad Coyne, Orion, Ill., 125; 16. Terry Neal, Ely, 115; 17. Eric Sanders, Sherrard, Ill., and Andy Nezworski, Buffalo, both 113; 19. Denny Eckrich, Tiffin, 104; 20. Charlie McKenna, Ames, 95.last_img read more