How to stay civil when others don’t share your political views

first_img Previous articleState Democratic chairman John Zody to step down in MarchNext articleHealth Department official concerned about COVID-19 spread after Notre Dame fans rush football field Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. How to stay civil when others don’t share your political views Twitter Twitter WhatsApp By Jon Zimney – November 8, 2020 4 509 Pinterest Facebook Google+ WhatsApp IndianaLocalNews Google+ Facebook Pinterest (95.3 MNC) You’ve probably witnessed or experienced some not-so-great conversations with people who have different views than you this year. A college professor at St. Mary’s College is trying to help others remain civil during those difficult and frustrating chats.Professor Megan Zwart at St. Mary’s College in South Bend has been teaching a class about civil discourse since 2016. In 2020, her students have been discussing some of the big topics.“Abortion. Gun rights. Immigration. Environmental policies,” Zwart said. “We’ve talked about ‘cancel culture’ which was an interesting one.”Once a week, her students get together for class, and go through a variety of stories, from “high-quality sources across the political field,” regarding some of the hot topics. Then they have an open dialogue about where they stand on those topics. Then, the conversation molds into listening exercises and teaching moments.“These things want to evolve into debates,” she said. “But for us, it’s really important to have a dialogue, not a debate.”“In a debate, somebody wins and somebody loses. But in a dialogue, everyone can learn something.”Zwirt says one of key things is to have an unbiased mindset heading into the discussion.“You have to have a good context in which everybody is up for it, everyone is willing to listen and learn,” she said. “If you try to persuade somebody, if that’s your aim, then you’re not in control of the outcome and you’re more likely to become frustrated. But if your intent is to understand, then you can ask curious questions to the other person that help you connect the dots. Why do they believe what they believe? How do their values and core beliefs give rise to their views on a specific issue?”She adds that we should live in a world where people have different views, but if you go into a conversation with the intent to try to understand the other view, then you’re going to come out of it thinking you got value out of that discussion.Another key factor is how you’re having this conversation. She advises that to try to do it in-person and not on social media.“It’s much more likely that people are there just to score points or to troll or to make their opponent look foolish.”You can read more about Professor Zwirt’s class, and their tips, at last_img read more

Roma in Europe face prejudice, exclusion, hate crimes

first_imgThe Roma in Europe are increasingly subject to racism, social exclusion, trafficking, and violence, in spite of efforts by European Union institutions to uphold Roma human rights, according to a new article by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health’s FXB Center for Health and Human Rights.Europe’s Roma population “constitutes the poorest, most stigmatized, and excluded population within the EU,” wrote Jacqueline Bhabha, FXB director of research and professor of the practice of public health and human rights, and Margareta Matache, FXB instructor, in an August 2, 2014 article on the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs website. As an example, they cited the June 2014 kidnapping and vicious beating in Paris of a Roma teen, who nearly died.Such brutal incidents are not unusual, the authors wrote. Against a backdrop of financially unstable times when xenophobic views are on the rise, there has been an uptick in negative public sentiment about the Roma, in openly racist anti-Roma statements made by politicians, and in moves to keep the Roma in segregated communities and schools. Such anti-Roma sentiment has emerged time and again throughout the long history of Roma life in Europe, the authors wrote. During the Holocaust, between 220,000 and 1.5 million of Europe’s Roma were killed. Read Full Storylast_img read more

Students reflect on Fr. Ted’s achievements

first_imgPhoto courtesy of the University archives For the students who met him, University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh was a powerful and memorable presence.Sophomore Andrew Lehmer met Hesburgh, who died Thursday at the age of 97, during his freshman year after attending a Latino retreat.“It was crazy how impactful his presence was,” Lehmer said. “You could sense every word meant something bigger.”Lehmer said he asked the former University president, civil rights activist, diplomat and priest what he could do to make his own life as meaningful as Hesburgh’s.“He told me ‘be a good Catholic,’” he said. “Obviously, that can be taken a lot of ways, but I’m trying to figure it out by actively pursuing the faith and keeping what he said in the back of my mind.”Sophomore Mary White, the president of Pasquerilla East Hall (PE), said a group of PE residents were supposed to meet with Hesburgh on Thursday afternoon. She said the dorm-wide response to the invitation to see Hesburgh was so overwhelming that the coordinators limited the visit to upperclassmen, though the meeting was eventually cancelled.To meet Hesburgh was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, White said.“It served as an integral Notre Dame experience,” she said. “It was something you would go on to tell your children about.”Junior Diego Valenzuela visited Hesburgh with his section of Stanford Hall last year, to talk with Hesburgh and hear his stories.“Just being in his presence was just unbelievable because this man has accomplished so much and done so many great things for Notre Dame and the United States and Catholics everywhere,” Valenzuela said.Late in his life, Hesburgh lost most of his sight as well as most of his mobility, but his mind remained sharp and his speaking powerful. Junior Jesse Hamilton said each time Hesburgh spoke to his ROTC class, he would be slowly led onstage.“It was such a slow, ginger process to get him up to the podium, and as soon as he spoke, he spoke with such clarity and sharpness,” Hamilton said. “It was incredible just to see how all of his mind was there and all the love he had for us. Any words that came out of his mouth, you knew were genuine, and just the couple times I met him, he inspired me to be the best Christian I can be, the best leader I can be. He will be greatly missed.”But for all his accomplishments — as a University president, as a leader in civil rights and Catholic education — and gravitas, students were struck by his congeniality and concern for each individual student.Junior Anthony Barrett also visited Hesburgh with his section from Stanford Hall. Barrett said the former president asked for each person’s name, hometown and major.“He would say something kind to each person,” Barrett said. “He’s done so much for us as a school, on a large level, and he also still took the time to get to know people on an individual level. That’s the kind of person that we should all aspire to be.”Junior Paul Coletti said he first met Hesburgh in front of the library named for him during a scavenger hunt in his freshman orientation weekend. Hesburgh stopped and spoke with the group.Later, Colletti became a University tour guide. During a tour Thursday, the day Hesburgh died, he told a group about Hesburgh’s accomplishments.“I told the girl who I was touring about how students are sometimes even called up to read to him, if they’re studying on the upper floors of the library, and she turned to her dad, and she was like, ‘I want to come here,’” he said. “… Little did I know.“He was a great University president. He was probably the closest thing to a living saint that I ever was in a picture with and shook hands with. He was certainly good for the University, but also good for Catholics everywhere.”Many students who never met Hesburgh also felt his influence. Junior Erin Bishop said in the days after his death, she kept thinking about his decision to make Notre Dame co-educational.“Without him, none of us would be here,” she said. “There would be no women here. That thought just keeps going through my head, you know? Without him, this wouldn’t be my life, and this is such a big part of my life. The University is really going to miss him. And I hope that they choose to celebrate his life rather than mourn his loss.”Junior Bryan Ricketts, student body president-elect, said he went to the 13th floor of the library after Hesburgh’s death to see his office. He said Hesburgh was instrumental in making Notre Dame co-ed and a premier research institution, and he looks to him for inspiration as a leader.“I hadn’t had the chance to speak to him after being elected; it was something I was hoping to do with the team,” Ricketts said. “He’s such an inspiration and left such a legacy.”Freshman Gabriel Gaspar never got the chance to meet Hesburgh, but when he heard of his death Thursday, he, like dozens of other students, headed to the Grotto to pay his respects.“He’s really affected a lot of people here,” he said. “Everyone I talk to, like my first week here, Fr. Hesburgh came up, like, ‘you should definitely meet him.’ He’s someone who can change your life. He’s someone who truly represents Notre Dame and really brings the meaning of it to this entire school.”Grotto candles were rearranged to spell “TED,” and people left a cigar and notes in candle holders. The gathering at the Grotto on Thursday also included an impromptu rendition of the Alma Mater. Freshman Will Lederer, who attended the event, said Hesburgh inspired a sense of community among Notre Dame students.“For the six months I’ve been here, I don’t think I’ve felt this way yet,” Letterer said. “Just the community, the service and the gratitude we owe Fr. Hesburgh, and the outpouring of support is just truly inspiring. It’s really heartwarming. I’m glad I was here.”Tags: Remembering Father Hesburgh, Student reactionslast_img read more

US, Colombia Cooperate on Range of Issues

first_imgBy David Vergun / Department Of Defense / Edited by the Diálogo staff February 14, 2020 U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Colombia is the United States’ “closest partner in Latin America,” and that he looks forward to strengthening their defense relationship even more.Esper welcomed Colombia’s Defense Minister Carlos Holmes Trujillo to the Pentagon on February 7. Following the meeting, the two held a press briefing to discuss areas of cooperation between both nations.Esper highlighted the two nations’ shared, long, and rich history of cooperation around the world, including during the Korean War when Colombia deployed troops in support of the United Nations-led military effort to protect South Korea. Colombia, Ester continued, has also participated for decades in the multinational force and observers who are keeping the peace in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula.The defense relationship was on display when Colombia hosted a joint army airborne exercise in January, he added. Esper said he and Trujillo would discuss more opportunities for future multilateral exercises in the region.Key to security in the region is resolving the crisis in Venezuela, where the Nicolás Maduro regime continues to violate its own people’s human rights, the secretary said.Terrorists, illicit trafficking groups, and unwelcome foreign influence exacerbate the situation, Esper said, adding that the U.S. and other nations are seeking a peaceful transition to democracy in Venezuela.“We are grateful for everything Colombia has done to assist Venezuelans fleeing Maduro’s oppression,” Esper said.The U.S. is also working with Colombia to curb cocaine production and trafficking. Esper noted an increase in illicit drugs eradication in 2019. He said the pace of that work continues this year.Esper said he also met with leaders of the U.S. Coast Guard to discuss how, in cooperation with the U.S. Defense Department, to support Colombia and other nations in counter-narcotics activity.Esper congratulated Trujillo and Colombia for becoming NATO’s first Latin American global partner in 2018. “This was a critical step toward improving your interoperability with the alliance and increasing your participation in exercises and military education. Meanwhile, NATO will greatly benefit from your experiences in counterterrorism and other military activities.”Trujillo thanked U.S. and Colombian service members and police for putting their lives on the line. “They are all heroes, and we owe them our eternal gratitude for providing the security that allows us to build and maintain our nations’ democratic values, freedom and human rights.”“The United States is Colombia’s most important and strategic partner,” the defense minister said. “The bilateral Colombia-U.S. relationship has historically been characterized by strong ties of friendship and cooperation on many fronts.”Trujillo said he shares with the U.S. the hope for a rapid transition to democracy in Venezuela, the eradication of illicit crops, and ending terrorism. He added that he looks forward to even more cooperation between the two nations’ militaries.last_img read more