Nirvana’s Final Studio Album, “In Utero”, Was Released 25 Years Ago Today [Listen]

first_imgIn just seven years—and only three with mainstream success—Nirvana paved the way for the sound of American music in the early 1990’s. Few bands were able to make such profound and impactful statements in the music industry in such a brief amount of time.Following their 1989 album, Bleach, and 1991’s Nevermind, Nirvana released their third and final studio album, In Utero, on September 21, 1993. It was a major step forward for the band, using this new platform of fame to challenge their audience and distort both their public image and their sound.The record wasn’t completed during their studio session with Steve Albini, however, and took R.E.M producer Scott Litt to dedicate some serious amendments to the album’s overall packaging, resolving controversy over the record’s production and mixing. This was difficult for bandleader Kurt Cobain to deal with, as he wanted to keep this record in the nature that sought to define it: raw, in the moment, fluid with his own pace. But the label wouldn’t approve, saying no one would like it.It was after Scott Litt’s adaptations that the quality of the record was finally ready for their label DGC to approve as commercially viable. With his help, “Heart-Shaped Box” made it out to the shelves as the first single, and the entire record eventually debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 chart. Selling over 180,000 copies in the first week alone, stores like Kmart and Wal-Mart still refused to sell the less-than-appropriate work-of-art.While the band’s intent was to relinquish mainstream approval and defy the standards of their label’s interests, they still managed to deliver one of the most important records of the 90s. Kurt Cobain died less a year later on April 5, 1994. In honor of In Utero‘s milestone birthday today, stream the full record below via Spotify:Nirvana – In Utero – Full Album Nirvana – In Utero – TracklistingAll songs written by Kurt Cobain, except where noted.“Serve the Servants” – 3:36“Scentless Apprentice” (Cobain, Dave Grohl, Krist Novoselic) – 3:48“Heart-Shaped Box” – 4:41“Rape Me” – 2:50“Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge on Seattle” – 4:09“Dumb” – 2:32“Very Ape” – 1:56“Milk It” – 3:55“Pennyroyal Tea” – 3:37“Radio Friendly Unit Shifter” – 4:51“tourette’s” – 1:35“All Apologies” – 3:51View Tracklistinglast_img read more

Alums recall effects of proposed merger in ’71

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the first in a five-day series discussing the role of women at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s, in honor of the 40th anniversary of coeducation at the University this year. As Notre Dame celebrates 40 years of coeducation, Saint Mary’s alumnae still remember a time when the two schools considered merging to create one Catholic college for both men and women under the Holy Cross order. While the merger fell apart in 1971, College archivist John Kovach said he believes the merger was a good idea at first. “At the time I definitely think it made sense to merge,” Kovach said. “In theory, however, the colleges quickly found out that no one wanted to lose and in situations such as this, one college was going to lose. “When looking at this era of the merger there were over 300 women’s colleges, that number has increasingly gone down. Today, it is a very unique choice to come to a women’s college.” A spring 1983 issue of The Courier, Saint Mary’s alumnae magazine, offered a timeline of the events leading up to the failed merger. Beginning in September 1965, the universities introduced a new co-exchange program through which students could take courses at either college, the timeline stated. This program marked a new beginning for the long-standing relationship of the two campuses since crossover classes for students on the neighboring campuses had not been an opportunity before. By May of 1969, Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame agreed to expand the co-exchange program. The colleges modified the freshman liberal arts curriculum to be consistent across campuses, introduced integrated dining options and seating at athletic events and synced academic calendars. While these measures hinted at a potential merger, both University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh and President Emeritus Monsignor John McGrath, presidents of the respective colleges at the time, issued a joint statement denying any rumors of a merger at the time. Senior Jessica Lopez, who studied the non-merger for over a year for her senior comprehensive project, said she believes the colleges considered the merger primarily for the benefit of Notre Dame students’ gender relations. “I found that it seemed what Notre Dame was interested in was what all-male colleges used in order to combine with a sister school,” Lopez said. “They would say they wanted to use the merger to act as a civilizing influence to prepare for real world interactions with women. Saint Mary’s would have given those benefits to Notre Dame.” In her findings, Lopez saw a diversity of opinions among students and faculty at the time. “There were some strong sentiments from students and some faculty,” Lopez said. “Some didn’t consider it a good option for Saint Mary’s. Even at Notre Dame people were against the merger. Fr. James Burtchaell, provost at Notre Dame during that time, asserted that Notre Dame did not need to merge with Saint Mary’s, but rather the College needed to merge with Notre Dame to survive.” According to the timeline, in May of 1971, the Boards of Trustees at both institutions formally approved plans to seek unification. According to a statement from that time, “the ultimate goal of this unification is a single institution with one student body of men and women, one faculty, one president and administration and one board of trustees.” The statement noted the preservation of Saint Mary’s identity would be by the matriculation of all women undergraduates of the University through Saint Mary’s as the college of record. It also recognized the importance of financial viability of any plan to merge the two institutions. According to a statement from the Board of Trustees from Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s, the ultimate goal of this unification was to form a single institution with one student body of men and women, one faculty, one president and administration and one Board of Trustees. “Unification of all academic departments of ND and SMC should be accomplished by the start of 1972-73,” the statement said. “The academic year 1974-75 is the target date for the completion of unification, but it is hoped that it might be accomplished even before that time.” However, by November of 1971, Mother Olivette Whalen and Edmund Stephan, chairpersons of the Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame Board of Trustees, respectively, issued a joint statement announcing the two institutions would “indefinitely suspend unification negotiation,” because organizers were “unable to solve financial and administrative problems.” Reconciling the financial differences between the two school’s budgets and pay to their employees, as well as the logistics in combining all the schools’ academic programs without losing any employees, became too difficult. Soon after, Notre Dame announced plans to begin accepting women directly. “Things started falling through,” Lopez said. “By December, all negotiations broke down. The administrations sent a letter to female applicants saying they could apply to both Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s or one or the other. There was another attempt to reopen negotiations the next year but nothing happened.” While a second attempt at a merger would be made the following year, Kovach said nothing materialized. “I think for something that is so important to the history of Saint Mary’s, I am surprised that so many decades later there still seems to be this aura of silence around the subject,” Kovach said. “The non-merger, I think, is the most important part of our college. We wouldn’t be here today, at least in this setting. We really bucked a trend and have proved successful. This success, I think is due to the leadership at the college. A merger wouldn’t have been an equal setting at all.” “There was a slow movement and sad decline in interest,” Lopez said. “Overall, there was no climactic point to the merger becoming a non-merger, the outcome just slopes downward.” Many students of the Class of 1975 accepted the offer to come to Saint Mary’s under the assumption the College would be merging with Notre Dame their freshman year, however. This caused for mixed feelings among the student body. “Mostly I remember the anger, disappointment and frustration when the merger didn’t go through,” Mary Meruisse Richardson, a 1975 alumna, said. “I remember the song, ‘There’s a Riot Going On’ wafting out from dorm windows.  I felt betrayed because I had accepted to come expecting the merger to go through and then it didn’t. When the merger fell apart, many of my friends transferred to ND. It split up our class and that was hard.” Mary-Margaret Anthonie Ney, also a 1975 alumna, said emotions ran high after the non-merger went public. “In some old editions of The Observer they covered many protests. We even made national news,” Ney said. “When it first happened, there was lot of resentment. … We never really heard a good explanation for why it was called off. It settled down after a while, though, and people made decisions. I chose to stay at Saint Mary’s as [a] Spanish major, which worked out really well for me. My roommate transferred to Notre Dame because her major found a better fit there.” Class of 1975 alumna Jeanne Murabito said at first she had mixed feelings about the merger cancellation, but later decided she was pleased with the outcome. “I knew I could take classes at Notre Dame and be a part of that social life,” Murabito said. “I chose not to transfer after my freshman year although some of my friends did. At first I was upset about it, but now I realize I had the best of both worlds. I was a humanistic studies major and I couldn’t get that anywhere else. The professors’ personal commitment to the College was extraordinary. I do not regret my decision to stay at the College.” Amy Dardinger, assistant director of reunion giving, said many alumna from the Class of 1975 are overcoming the emotions of the non-merger and are giving back to the College more. “Many of them have come to the point that they appreciate that Saint Mary’s is still here,” she said. Because many women’s colleges merged with brother institutions at this time, most alumnae of these institutions find themselves returning to a fundamentally different college. “Now I think many alums return to the College and think ‘How lucky are we that we are able to return to a single-sex institution?’” Kovach said. “So many women’s colleges at this time merged with partner institutions and I think Saint Mary’s is very lucky to have not merged. I think that time has made some folks open their eyes to what the consequences of the merger really could have been. This really shaped the identity of the College.” Many alumnae of the college and that Class of 1975 said they are thankful Saint Mary’s remained independent. “It worked out very well for me,” Ney said. “I love Saint Mary’s, it’s a great place and I felt like I grew up there and became my own person. I am still very proud of Saint Mary’s.” Contact Jillian Barwick at [email protected] and Kaitlyn Rabach at [email protected]last_img read more

Pulis backs Lambert to make impact

first_img “Saido got injured and missed the European tournament (Euro 2015), that was a massive disappointment for the kid. “But it has given him a break and a rest so hopefully he will come back nice and fresh.” Along with Lambert, James Chester and James McClean should make their Albion debuts but Arsenal loanee Serge Gnabry will miss out as he lacks match fitness. The former Liverpool hitman is expected to be handed his Baggies debut against Manchester City on Monday. He will partner Berahino, who scored 20 goals last season, and has signed to lift the scoring burden off the 22-year-old. And boss Pulis thinks the England forward can only help Berahino’s progression. He said: “Last year we relied a lot on Saido’s goals. “Rickie has a really good goal-scoring record and we are hoping he will add to what Saido did last year. “He will give us another threat. Rickie is a senior player and good character as well. I think Saido will learn a lot off him.” Berahino has been linked with a move from The Hawthorns this summer but Pulis believes he needs another season in the West Midlands. He added: He is a good player and we want to keep him and we want him to stay at the football club. “I believe another year playing regular football at West Bromwich Albion will make him a better player. “It will make him a stronger character and better player that is my opinion. Press Association West Brom boss Tony Pulis believes Rickie Lambert can help take Saido Berahino to the next level.last_img read more

Tough loss for Titans

first_imgAs the Titans’ defense collapsed around him, the sweeper calmly flicked the ball to teammate Salvador Roman, who was about three feet away from goal. While San Marino goalie Royce Stuteville originally pinned Roman’s first shot attempt against the goal post on a diving attempt, the senior couldn’t recover and left the net open for Roman. The Cardinals’ midfielder then tapped in the game-winning goal in the 79th minute. “I wasn’t expecting to lose today,” Monroy said. “I was surprised when they scored that goal.” Perhaps more surprising was the play of Cardinals goalie John Nava. He gave up a penalty kick to Patrick McGowan and a Coco Raether goal off an assist from John Trawick in the first half, but the senior goalkeeper played well in the second half and finished with nine saves. He stopped two point-blank attempts in the 55th minute by San Marino’s Cristian Raether. He stopped the Titans’ top striker again in the 63rd minute on a five-footer. Nava’s top save may have come in the third minute, when he blocked Bryan King’s penalty shot. “We couldn’t panic,” Nava said. “I have to give a lot of credit to our defense because (San Marino) had a lot of chances and just couldn’t make any. That gave us the confidence to make a comeback.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! That’s when the opportunistic Cardinals (11-6-4) went to work. Santa Paula caught a momentum-shifting break in the 69th minute when the Titans’ Stevie Yortsos pulled down Santa Paula’s Sergio Alamillo in the penalty area. Santa Paula, which had only one shot on goal over the previous 25 minutes, capitalized on San Marino’s mistake when senior Luis Vaca connected on his second penalty kick goal of the game to tie the score 2-2. The rejuvenated Cardinals then pulled off the stunner. A simple throw-in from about 20 yards from goal by Cardinals midfielder Jose Mejia bounced away from two Titans in the penalty area and right to Vaca. SAN MARINO – It was one of the older sports clich s being played out Wednesday at San Marino High School. The Santa Paula boys soccer team, despite being dominated in shots on goal, hung around with San Marino before scoring two goals in the game’s final 15 minutes to shock the Titans 3-2 in a CIF-Southern Section Division V wild-card playoff game. center_img “We weren’t supposed to show any mercy,” San Marino coach Oswaldo Monroy said. “We wasted a lot of shots. We needed to go up 3-1 or 4-1 in the game and put them away and we didn’t.” San Marino (8-11-4) was leading 2-1 in the 65th minute after out-shooting its opponent 14-5 and was 15 minutes away from advancing to the first round. last_img read more