Fischer Set To Race In His Final NCAA Championship

first_imgFischer’s race is set to start at 9:08 p.m. and will be broadcast on ESPN. Earning All-America honors this season would cap one of the best seasons in Drake history. He is a four-time MVC Champion this season claiming MVC titles in cross country, sweeping the 3,000 and 5,000 meters during the indoor season and most recently claiming the 10,000-meter title. He is a three-time NCAA qualifier, a three-time all-region selection and a seven-time All-MVC selection. Drake University senior Reed Fischer (Minnetonka, Minn.) aims to put the finishing touches on an stellar season and outstanding career when he races in the 10,000 meters on Wednesday evening at the NCAA Track & Field Championships in Eugene, Ore. Fischer, the reigning Missouri Valley Conference champion in the event owns a season best time of 29:57.37 that ranks as the 21st fastest time in the field this season. Last season, he finished 17th in the event to narrowly miss earning All-America honors.center_img Fischer has set school records this season in the indoor 3,000 and 5,000 meters as well as the outdoor 5,000 meters. His record setting performance in setting the outdoor 5,000 meters came at the Drake Relays to shatter the 39-year-old record and run the fastest 5,000 meters the Relays since 1988. He also owns the second fastest 10,000-meter time in program history. Academically, Fischer was the MVC Cross Country Elite 18 Award winner and a CoSIDA Academic All-District honoree while garnering multiple USTFCCCA All-Academic accolades. An English/public relations major with a 3.81 grade point average, Fischer has been nominated for the Oreon E. Scott Award, given to the top senior at Drake University. He has collected a total of six MVC Scholar-Athlete Team selections and been named the MVC Scholar-Athlete of the Week 10 times in his career. Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

Holloway wants summer of ins and outs at QPR

first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesIan Holloway reiterated his determination to revamp QPR’s squad after they ended a miserable season with a 4-0 defeat at Norwich. The result, Rangers’ seventh loss in eight matches, meant they finished 18th in the Championship – the club’s lowest placing for 10 years.Now manager Holloway is keen to bring in new faces.“It’s all about the people we bring. I’ve got to get them right,” he said.“I’m old enough to know that it’s not about today. It’s all about pre-season, it’s about getting the scouting network to find us some new different faces.“If I can move some things in and out it’ll be a joy to be able to try to get better than we have been.”Rangers were soundly beaten at Carrow Road and Holloway admitted the scoreline could have been even more embarrassing, but he defended the effort of his players.“I don’t think my lads didn’t try, but we were nowhere near,” he said.“We had one or two efforts, but that was one game too much for the squad, with the injuries we had.“It just proved a huge learning curve for the people we have got in there and it was probably too much for them on the day.”See also:QPR end season with another dismal defeatNorwich v QPR player ratingsQPR need two more transfer windows – HollowayMackie offered new contract by QPRHolloway bemoans change to loan system   Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch) x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Why Academic Freedom Is Dangerous

first_imgBarbara Forrest has a tough case on her hands.  The veteran creationist-fighter has to convince the people of Louisiana that they did a bad thing by passing the Academic Freedom Bill, because academic freedom when it comes to discussing intelligent design and evolution is dangerous (cf. 05/12/2008, bullet 3).  The bill passed by 94-3 in the state House and unanimously in the Senate.    Amanda Gefter, reporting on New Scientist admitted Forrest has the deck stacked against her.  Those supporting the measure outnumbered her group and had more spirit.  Nevertheless, she empathized with Forrest’s anti-ID position, titling her article “New legal threat to teaching evolution in the US” and speaking of “hidden dangers” in the bill recently signed by Governor Bobby Jindal that protects the rights of teachers who wish to supplement their lessons with alternative material on controversial science topics such as evolution, human cloning and global warming, after first teaching the assigned textbook material.  It is the prospect of offering alternatives to evolution that has generated the most heated discussion.    What is it about the evolution issue that is so threatening to the time-honored tradition of giving voice to opposing views on controversial topics, and letting people think critically about the evidence?  In sum, here are the arguments as gleaned from the article for forbidding academic freedom on the evolution question:[Forrest] had spent weeks trying to muster opposition to the bill on the grounds that it would allow teachers and school boards across the state to present non-scientific alternatives to evolution, including ideas related to intelligent design (ID) – the proposition that life is too complicated to have arisen without the help of a supernatural agent.The act is designed to slip ID in “through the back door”, says Forrest, who is a professor of philosophy at Southeastern Louisiana University and an expert in the history of creationism.She adds that the bill’s language, which names evolution along with global warming, the origins of life and human cloning as worthy of “open and objective discussion”, is an attempt to misrepresent evolution as scientifically controversial.Jindal …. enjoys a close relationship with the Louisiana Family Forum (LFF), a lobbying group for the religious right whose mission statement includes “presenting biblical principles” in “centers of influence”.  It was the LFF which set the bill in motion earlier this year.The development has national implications, not least because Jindal is rumoured to be on Senator John McCain’s shortlist as a potential running mate in his bid for the presidency.The new legislation is the latest manoeuvre in a long-running war to challenge the validity of Darwinian evolution as an accepted scientific fact in American classrooms.…Forrest presented evidence that ID was old-fashioned creationism by another name….“Academic freedom is a great thing,” says Josh Rosenau of the National Center for Science Education in Oakland, California.  “But if you look at the American Association of University Professors’ definition of academic freedom, it refers to the ability to do research and publish.”This, he points out, is different to the job high-school teachers are supposed to do.  “In high school, you’re teaching mainstream science so students can go on to college or medical school, where you need that freedom to explore cutting-edge ideas.  To apply ‘academic freedom’ to high school is a misuse of the term.”“It’s very slick,” says Forrest.  “The religious right has co-opted the terminology of the progressive left… They know that phrase appeals to people.”….those who wish to challenge Darwinian evolution have “plausible deniability” that this is intended to teach something unconstitutional…. “They are better camouflaged now.”In a landmark 1987 case known as Edwards vs Aguillard, the US Supreme Court ruled the [balanced treatment] law unconstitutional, effectively closing the door on teaching “creation science” in public schools.Convinced that intelligent design is unconstitutional, Forrest is worried that the bill makes it harder for opponents of ID to sue schools and teachers who present what they feel is religious material.  “Because the law allows individual boards and teachers to make additions to the science curriculum without clearance from a state authority,” Gefter reported, “the responsibility will lie with parents to mount a legal challenge to anything that appears to be an infringement of the separation of church and state.”  Forrest complained that this is like starting a lot of local brush fires that have to be fought individually.  “This is done intentionally, to get this down to the local level,” she said.  “It’s going to be very difficult to even know what’s going on.”    Forrest says she doesn’t fight “academic freedom” for fun, but because it’s a duty.  Her next tactic is to get the word to teachers to be on the lookout for creationist material finding its way into science class.    Writing for National Review, Discovery Institute senior fellow John West denied that the Louisiana bill is a threat to science.  “The act is not a license for teachers to do anything they want,” he said.  “Instruction must be ‘objective,’ inappropriate materials may be vetoed by the state board of education, and the law explicitly prohibits teaching religion in the name of science, stating that its provisions ‘shall not be construed to promote any religious doctrine.’”  It is hypocritical for pro-Darwin lobbyists to fight this bill on religious grounds, he said, when many of them have a clear atheist agenda.  He pointed out that Barbara Forrest is a militant atheist and long-time board member of the New Orleans Secular Humanist Organization.    West countered that the real threat to science is to indoctrinate students and fail to teach them how to evaluate evidence.  The law was so carefully framed, he added, that even the head of the Louisiana ACLU has had to concede that it is constitutional as written.  He accused the “usual suspects” of mounting a “disinformation campaign” against the bill which turned out to be a massive failure in Louisiana.  Both political parties, he pointed out, were nearly unanimous in support of the bill, and some science professors came to the hearings to testify in favor of the bill.    West argued that students deserve to be taught more than the consensus views on controversial issues, because historically the consensus has often been wrong or subject to blind fanaticism (he cited the eugenics movement, supported by all the leading scientific societies of the early 1900s, as a particularly bad example).  Furthermore, scientific positions often have serious implications for society and government policy.  Students, therefore, need to be able to evaluate critically the evidence on which the claims are based.  “In truth, the effort to promote thoughtful discussion of competing scientific views is pro-science,” he concluded.    Michael Stebbins (co-founder of Scientists and Engineers for America) did not quite elevate the cordiality of the dialogue when he wrote in The Scientist about “Jindal’s Creationist Folly” and referred to intelligent design as “urine in the education pool.”  Meanwhile, Evolution News took time out for a reality check concerning the New Scientist article.Hallelujah!  The dogmatists are on the run.  Were you impressed by the scare tactics and loaded words used to support the idea that high school students are so dumb and pliable, they must be indoctrinated into lily-white evolutionary truths lest their pure minds get corrupted by evil religious ideas?  Were you attracted by the tender vitriol of their hate speech?    This is how you make freedom look dangerous.  You characterize the ones calling for freedom as evil.  Those sneaky, creepy (05/22/2008), creationists are just angry they lost at Dover.  So in retaliation, they look for new ways to set brush fires and wreak havoc on civilization (cf. 11/30/2005).  Thus black is white and white is black.  (Be sure to throw in a few big lies wherever needed, like defining ID incorrectly, mischaracterizing the Supreme Court ruling [it does not prevent teaching creation science but only laws that require teaching creation equally alongside evolution], and claiming there is no controversy among evolutionists; see 03/07/2008.  Also, keep holding up the Dover decision – an ACLU-plagiarized ruling by one unelected judge in one Pennsylvania school district – as the standard of jurisprudence for the entire world.)    Evolution, of course, is so “scientific” that it is the only contender for a science class (06/03/2008).  And of course, evolutionists have no bias or agenda (06/21/2008, 04/13/2008).  Why, those evolutionists, they are so smart, and so logical (04/14/2008, 03/12/2008) they know for a fact that people have bacteria ancestors (03/20/2008, 02/22/2008).  They only tell the honest truth (03/06/2008).  Their math is so good they get the whole universe out of nothing (01/15/2008).  Yes, we must protect students from challenges to those natural truths.  Nothing supernatural about their miracles.  And they just lo-o-o-o-o-ve the people of Louisiana (04/09/2008).  They would never do legal maneuvering and play politics to sneak around the will of the people (02/20/2008).    The dogmatists can’t win through the democratic process and town hall or through open debate on the evidence, so they use the courtroom and special-interest PACs.  To enforce their will on the people, they get unelected judges to tell us what science is, and get the ACLU and Americans United for “Separation of Church and State” (a misleading slogan, more properly United Against Academic Freedom) to slap parents, teachers and students with budget-busting lawsuits (intimidation, e.g., 01/06/2007).  Who has been setting those brush fires?  No wonder the people at the Louisiana hearing were wearing stickers, clapping, cheering and standing in the aisles.  No longer will they have to stay after class with Ben Stein, covering the chalkboard with “I will not question Darwinism.”    Let’s keep the pressure on Barb till she emigrates to a country she would really enjoy – Cuba.  There, she can stand and clap for little Elian Gonzalez – you remember the little boy denied freedom in America and captured at gunpoint and shipped to Castro’s evolutionary heaven?  Now, eight years older (high school age) and sufficiently indoctrinated with the consensus view, Elian is a proud young member of the Communist Youth Brigade (see New York Times).  He promised he will never let down the murderous Castro dictators.  Enough to make Forrest clap, cheer and stand in the aisle!  Sufficiently programmed, Gonzalez will have all the academic freedom he wants to be a good, loyal communist on an island where alternative views are systematically excluded.  Maybe he can debate (with his professional academic freedom) controversial topics like whether an annual pro-communist rally should be held on Fidel’s birthday or on Raul’s.  See?  We’re only trying to alleviate the anxiety that is wearing Barbara Forrest down.  Why not take your services to a place where they would be appreciated?    After reading the anti-ID smear piece on New Scientist, take a refreshing intellectual shower.  Read John West’s piece on National Review celebrating the fact that neo-Darwinism is no longer a protected orthodoxy in Bayou country.  He explains what academic freedom is really all about.  If you agree, get to work against the Darwin-only-Darwin-only DODOs in your state.(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Tainted Water, LEED Winners, Passive House Conference, Boost for Renewables

first_imgLEED announces Home Award winnersA combined faculty residence and learning lab for students at a private school in Connecticut has won top honors among single-family projects in the annual LEED Home Awards.The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), which oversees the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program, said the project at The Taft School in Watertown, Connecticut, was the first building in the state to be certified as LEED Platinum under the Building Design and Construction rating system using new and more stringent LEED v4 rules.This combination residence and lab for students was chosen as the best single-family project in this year’s LEED Home Awards. It’s located on the campus of a private school in Connecticut. (Photo: U.S. Green Building Council)The net-zero energy house is used as a teaching tool for science classes as well as a house. Students monitor energy use while tending a vegetable garden and raising chickens on what the USGBC called a “comprehensive sustainability site.”The house has total living space of 3,388 square feet on three levels, including the basement, with three bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, a small laundry, an office, a kitchen, plus living and dining rooms. It was designed by Trillium Architects and built by BPC Green Builders.Exterior walls are double-stud 2×4 construction with a space between the two rows of studs and a total depth of 10 1/2 inches. Walls are insulated with 2 inches of closed-cell spray foam, 8 1/2 inches of dense-packed cellulose, and 1 1/2-inch Zip R sheathing with taped seams (R-47.5). The attic is insulated with 24 inches of cellulose, with 8 inches of expanded polystyrene beneath the slab. Foundation walls are insulated on the inside with 3 inches of closed-cell foam plus dense-packed cellulose to R-29.6.Heating and cooling are provided by Mitsubishi minisplit heat pumps. There’s also a 13-kilowatt photovoltaic array on the roof.The house has been certified by the Passive House Institute U.S. Other sustainable features include proximity to the school for a smaller “transportation footprint,” deconstruction of a house that previously occupied the site, WaterSense certification, and on-site rainwater management.The USGBC also announced winning projects in a number of other categories. The overall project of the year, developed by SolTerra in Portland, Oregon, is an 18-unit mixed use apartment building (see Image #2, below) called The Woodlawn. Other winners included the Frankel Building Group of Houston, Texas, outstanding single-family builder; National Church Residences of Columbus, Ohio, outstanding affordable builder; the 32-unit Brookside Village Housing, Farmington, Maine, outstanding affordable project; Tilley Lofts, Watervliet, New York, outstanding multifamily project; and Forest City Realty Trust of Cleveland, Ohio, outstanding multifamily developer. A continental pledge for more renewablesHalf of the electricity produced collectively by Canada, Mexico, and the U.S. will come from renewable energy and nuclear sources by 2025 under terms of a deal between the three countries announced in the Canadian capital.The 50% target is the average for all three countries, not each nation. Utility Dive reports that the three-country average is now 37% renewables and nuclear power, but getting to 50% will pose some challenges. In Mexico, for example, less than 20% of electricity comes from renewables and nuclear. About one-third of the electricity produced in the U.S. comes from nuclear and other renewables — including hydro, solar and wind — and in Canada the proportion is greater than 80%.The Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan (CPP), which is now under a judicial stay from the U.S. Supreme Court, will be needed to meet the 50% goal, so that’s one potential problem. Utility Dive says that even if the CPP survives this legal test, the U.S. will have to do more in the way of energy policy in order to uphold its end of the bargain.The fate of nuclear power in the U.S. is another question mark. Currently, about 20% of U.S. electricity comes from nuclear plants, but many plants are having a tough time competing in energy markets because of cheap natural gas and lower demand. Very few new nuclear plants are in the works, so if existing plants are closed (Exelon announced last month it would retire two plants in Illinois), other sources of non-fossil generation would have to come online to replace them.As part of the pact, Mexico agrees to join Canada and the U.S. in efforts to cut methane emissions by as much as 40% by 2025. Power trading across international borders also would become easier.The deal was announced on June 29 in Ottawa. Report faults government enforcement of water safety lawsViolations of national rules designed to keep lead out of drinking water are common, with 18 million Americans getting drinking water from providers that have violated federal laws, The Guardian reports. Citing a report from the National Resources Defense Council, The Guardian said the discovery in Flint, Michigan, that public water supplies were tainted with lead is “not anomalous.” The NRDC’s analysis of data from the Environmental Protection Agency found 5,363 water systems in the U.S. violated the federal Lead and Copper Rule in 2015. Collectively, these systems provide water to more than 18 million people.Violations occurred in most states. The most serious involved water provided by 1,100 community water utilities that exposed more than 3.9 million people to levels of lead exceeding the EPA’s actionable limit.Even so, few of the water suppliers were punished. Enforcement action was taken in just 11% of the 8,000 violations; the government sought penalties in only 3% of the cases.“This lack of accountability sends a clear message to water suppliers that knowingly violate the Lead and Copper Rule, with state and federal complicity,” the NRDC report said. “There is no cop on the beat.“In the Flint lead crisis (from 2014 to the present) and previously in Washington, D.C. (from 2001 to 2004), the EPA failed to act, downplayed the problem, and emboldened the actions of some water systems and primacy agencies,” the NRDC report continued. “These experiences and the data showing widespread lack of enforcement highlight a need for a culture change at the EPA and among state regulatory bodies to ensure that violations are taken seriously and public health threats are addressed promptly.”The EPA responded by saying many of the water systems that violated rules last year have already corrected the problems, The Guardian reported, while the agency has “intensified work” with state drinking water programs to make sure the Lead and Copper Rule is enforced. In a separate report, The Guardian said documents it requested from 80 of the biggest cities east of Mississippi showed 33 of them were using water-testing methods the EPA advised against earlier this year. Some of the water districts were using testing methods that can mask the actual amount of lead in drinking water.Even at very low levels, lead can do serious and irreversible harm to babies and young children, the NRDC report notes, decreasing cognitive abilities and causing a variety of behavioral problems that follow them into adulthood.center_img Passive House conference program now downloadableIf you missed the North American Passive House Network conference in New York City earlier this month, you can still have a look at the program with a downloadable PDF and flipbook called “Passive House Accelerates.”The free online book is divided into a number of topic areas — including policy, economics, resilience, and systems — and recaps presentations made during the two-day conference. The list includes Carri Beer and Michael Hindle, authors of an ongoing guest blog series at Green Building Advisor, and Chris Corson of Maine-based Ecocor, which has started producing a line of prefabricated Passive House buildings in collaboration with architect Richard Pedranti.There are descriptions of a variety of residential and commercial projects, both new construction and retrofits.Ken Levenson, co-president of the North American Passive House Network, said that the book doesn’t cover every aspect of the conference but should still be useful to designers and builders who weren’t able to make it to New York.last_img read more

New Orleans Pelicans win NBA draft lottery, right to pick No. 1

first_imgLATEST STORIES The Knicks, Suns and Cavs didn’t have much interest in winning this season, with none winning more than 19 games. The ping-pong balls apparently weren’t interested in having them win the lottery, either.“I don’t think you should ever not play to win basketball games,” Pelicans coach Alvin Gentry said. “I don’t see where it would help you.”Cleveland will pick fifth, followed by Phoenix, Chicago and Atlanta. Washington has the No. 9 pick, Atlanta goes again at 10 and Minnesota is at No. 11. Charlotte is next up, followed by Miami at 13 and Boston at 14. That pick was conveyed to the Celtics by Sacramento as part of an earlier trade.The Hawks felt they were big winners, too, after getting two top-10 picks.“There are always good players,” said Hawks guard Kevin Huerter, the No. 19 pick in last year’s draft and part of Atlanta’s contingent at the lottery. “Every team just has to go out and find them.”UCF center Tacko Fall, the 7-foot-6 draft hopeful, played against Williamson in the second round of the NCAA tournament — a 77-76 Duke victory that went down to the very last moment, a game where Williamson scored 32 points. Fall was asked Tuesday who he would take with the No. 1 pick in this draft, and he did not hesitate for even a second before answering.“Zion,” Fall said. “He’s a once-in-a-generation player. I’d seen him on TV a lot, but when you play against this kid, you just see it. He’s different.”Murray State’s Ja Morant, projected by many as a strong candidate to be chosen No. 2 overall, was among the players in the audience viewing the proceedings.“I don’t have any reaction,” Morant said. “I was just excited to be here and be in the position that I’m in and just to see how it all played out. Honestly, I don’t know what number or where I’ll land. Obviously, whatever team drafts me, I’ll be happy to go there and bring it every night.”Williamson was one of three now-former Duke starters at the lottery — R.J. Barrett and Cam Reddish were among the invited players as well. Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess David Griffin, New Orleans Pelicans executive vice president of basketball operations, holds up placards after it was announced that the Pelicans had won the first pick during the NBA basketball draft lottery Tuesday, May 14, 2019, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Nuccio DiNuzzo)CHICAGO — Zion Williamson has never been to New Orleans.That may be changing very soon.ADVERTISEMENT Two-day strike in Bicol fails to cripple transport Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting View comments DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Catholic schools seek legislated pay hike, too PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Barrett and Reddish don’t know where they’re heading.Williamson now has a pretty good idea.Aided by a lucky tie that came from Cavaliers executive Jeff Cohen — the one Cohen wore for all three of Cleveland’s lottery wins, and one Griffin insisted he get to use this year — along with an angel pin that belonged to his grandmother and the winning ping-pong ball combination of 7-4-12-13, Griffin is already off to a flying start in New Orleans.And maybe Davis will be more interested in staying now.“I don’t think it’ll play into it hugely,” Griffin said. “If he was open-minded to believing that we could build a winner around him, he’s more open-minded to it. … We’re going to build something that we hope everyone wants to be part of and I believed very strongly Anthony’s going to want to be part of that whether we win this or not. I think when you have elite talent, that tends to attract other truly elite talent.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Griffin was with Cleveland when the Cavaliers won the lottery in 2011, 2013 and 2014. And now it’s the Pelicans, his new employer, which has struck lottery gold. They defied the odds to do it; the Pelicans entered the lottery with a 6% chance of winning the No. 1 pick for the June 20 draft.So now, instead of going into a summer where they may have traded Davis — the player New Orleans got when it won the lottery in 2012, the player who was openly disgruntled this season — the Pelicans have a chance at becoming much better, and fast.“This just jump-starts the process,” Griffin said. “It’ll be harder for me to mess it up than it would have been before this.”Memphis will choose second, New York third and the Los Angeles Lakers will pick fourth. The Pelicans, Grizzlies and Lakers all moved up to get a top-four spot; New York, Phoenix and Cleveland had the best odds of winning the lottery at 14% each, and none of those clubs even got a top-two pick.The lottery had a new format this year, one that the league hoped would even the playing field in a number of ways and didn’t make all-out tanking a more enticing option to teams looking to maximize their chance at securing the No. 1 pick.ADVERTISEMENT ‘Rebel attack’ no cause for concern-PNP, AFP Endgame Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess MOST READ The Pelicans bucked seriously long odds Tuesday night, winning the NBA draft lottery and the right to have the first chance at selecting the former Duke star next month — and potentially pairing him with Anthony Davis, in what would immediately become one of the league’s most intriguing frontcourt duos.“I don’t believe the universe makes mistakes,” said David Griffin, who is barely a month into his tenure as New Orleans’ executive vice president of basketball operations. “I just think we have something special going on.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsGriffin doesn’t play the lottery, unless the jackpot is one of those billion-dollar-type enormous ones.Maybe he should. The ping-pong balls seem to bounce his way a lot.last_img read more