Tweet about former teachers hotness leads to heat for Manitoba politician

first_imgWINNIPEG – A Manitoba politician is facing some heat after tweeting about the “hotness” of his former homeroom teacher.Steven Fletcher, an Independent member of the legislature, posted a message on Twitter in reply to a woman who taught him in Grades 7 and 8.The message thanks her for commenting on an article Fletcher had published and also revealed that he was attracted to her 35 years ago.The tweet says: “You were always the hottest teacher. All the boys loved you in inappropriate ways.”Many people — including Rochelle Squires, Manitoba’s minister for the status of women — have replied, telling Fletcher his remarks were inappropriate and offensive.Fletcher says he meant no offence — many boys have crushes on their teachers — and people are reacting too harshly.“It looks like we’re living in a society where it is becoming increasingly difficult to be human,” Fletcher said Friday.“Yes, I had a crush on my Grade 7 teacher, and, yes, she was photogenic and very smart.”Squires tweeted that she was at a loss for words.“I don’t even know what to say — so, so insulting, demeaning, inappropriate.”Fletcher served as a minister of state in former prime minister Stephen Harper’s cabinet between 2008 and 2013 before being shuffled out.In 2016, Fletcher ran for the Manitoba Tories after losing his federal seat and won. But a year later he was booted out of that caucus for publicly breaking with the party on a number of policies.He stood by his tweet Friday.“They’re not bad words. They’re not profanity or anything,” he said.“I would hazard a guess that virtually every single person who has made a comment on this has used the word ‘hottest’ in describing someone sometime in their life.”last_img read more

Navy San Diego Community Partners Sign Agreement to Explore Point Loma Transit

first_img ADC AUTHOR The Navy, the Navy’s Southwest Region Command and the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) have entered into new contract to explore development of a major public transit hub to be located at Naval Base Point Loma, The San Diego Union-Tribune reported Wednesday.The proposed transit station, locally nicknamed as “San Diego Central Station,” would need space allocated at the 70-acre base that overlooks Interstate 5 in Point Loma. It would serve as a future transportation hub that connects all rail types and provides access to San Diego International Airport, according to the report.“This is the beginning of what I expect to be a long partnership with the Navy,” said Steve Vaus, who chairs the SANDAG board and is the mayor of Poway. “The MOU creates the opportunity for SANDAG and the Navy to do something very special in the region, clearing a path for us to work on a major transportation hub and providing a transit link to the airport,” he added.Located close to downtown San Diego and its airport, the expansive property could feature millions of square feet of multi-purpose office space as well as multi-family housing towers and some retail.The Navy eventually plans to seek redevelopment proposals for the property in exchange for new facilities for the installation’s on-base missions, according to the report.“The Navy remains dedicated to creating a more modern, efficient workspace … while working closely with SANDAG and other entities to foster robust community engagement for this project,” said Capt. Mark Edelson, commanding officer of Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwest.Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Derek Harkinslast_img read more

Bridgmanite sample found to remain stable at lower mantle conditions

first_imgSchematic picture of the Earth’s interior. On the right side is the example of the part of the two-dimensional wide scan of x-ray diffraction image of Fe, Al-bearing bridgmanite, on the left side is the crystal structure of pure Fe-bridgmanite. Credit: Leyla Ismailova/University of Bayreuth More information: L. Ismailova et al. Stability of Fe,Al-bearing bridgmanite in the lower mantle and synthesis of pure Fe-bridgmanite, Science Advances (2016). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1600427AbstractThe physical and chemical properties of Earth’s mantle, as well as its dynamics and evolution, heavily depend on the phase composition of the region. On the basis of experiments in laser-heated diamond anvil cells, we demonstrate that Fe,Al-bearing bridgmanite (magnesium silicate perovskite) is stable to pressures over 120 GPa and temperatures above 3000 K. Ferric iron stabilizes Fe-rich bridgmanite such that we were able to synthesize pure iron bridgmanite at pressures between ~45 and 110 GPa. The compressibility of ferric iron–bearing bridgmanite is significantly different from any known bridgmanite, which has direct implications for the interpretation of seismic tomography data. Journal information: Science Advances (Phys.org)—A diverse team of researchers with members from Germany, France, Russia and the U.S. has subjected a sample of bridgmanite to conditions believed to be present at Earth’s lower mantle and has found that it remained stable. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes the testing they conducted, what they found and their theory regarding the dynamo effect that is, perhaps, the source of the planet’s magnetic field Citation: Bridgmanite sample found to remain stable at lower mantle conditions (2016, July 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-07-bridgmanite-sample-stable-mantle-conditions.html Developing a picture of the Earth’s mantlecenter_img Explore further Studying the interior of planet Earth is difficult due to the huge scale involved—researchers cannot simply drill a hole all the way to the core to grab samples of material. For that reason, they have developed and used other tools such as seismic monitors to learn more. Though the have learned much, there is still a lot that is unknown or uncertain. One of these uncertainties is the makeup of the planet’s lower mantle—the part just next to the core. Prior research has indicated that it is likely a mineral called bridgmanite. Other researchers have suggested that bridgmanite would not be stable under the very high temperature and pressure that would exist in the lower mantle. In this new effort, the researchers sought to settle this debate by bringing samples of bridgmanite into their lab and testing it.To exert very high pressure on the sample similar to that believed to exist in the lower mantle, the researchers used laser-heated diamond anvil cells—creating a vice-like grip by squeezing a very small sample between two diamonds and focusing a laser on them. The team ran several such experiments at different temperatures and pressures, maxing out at 23 gigapascals and 1,800 Kelvin. They then used X-rays to examine the samples to see how they held. The team reports that the samples held up very well and concluded that bridgmanite is stable under the conditions believed to exist at the lower mantle.The team found that when samples contained different amounts of iron, there were differing levels of stability. Those differences, they suggest, could offer an explanation for seismic activity deep in the planet which could play a role in establishing the dynamo that is responsible for the planet’s magnetic field. © 2016 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more